The only organization dedicated solely to helping state boards advance equity and excellence in public education.


Between 2007 and 2017, the suicide rate among young people ages 10–24 increased by 56 percent, making it the second leading cause of death in the United States for this age group. State boards of education must ensure that students have the supports, environments, and education necessary to thrive. To lay the foundation, these policymakers can collaborate on a model suicide prevention policy.

U.S. students face persistent pressures to juggle academics, social dynamics, and multiple responsibilities in addition to dealing with cyberbullying, social media, safety, and the availability of drugs and alcohol. As a result, many students may develop debilitating health conditions—anxiety, depression, sleep loss, substance use, and eating disorders—which can escalate to suicide ideation and attempts.


Developing Policy to Prevent Youth Suicide



Related Content



Featured Items

Multiracial group of teachers walking in school hallway. Image credit: iStock i

Strengthening the Principal Pipeline through State Leadership Academies

Missouri, Delaware, and North Carolina have developed evidence-based professional learning for current and prospective school leaders to increase their effectiveness and reduce turnover.
A multi-ethnic group of seven children standing in a row in a school hallway, laughing and smiling at the camera. The little boys and girls are kindergarten or preschool age, 4 to 6 years. i

State Advances in Early Childhood Education Seed Plans for 2024

In 2023, several states made significant strides toward universal pre-K, increased funding and support for early educators, and improved literacy and math instruction.
Business people sitting on books. Image credit: iStock i

Curriculum That Counts

Authors in this issue of the Standard draw lessons from a spectrum of state policies that are being used to increase the adoption of high-quality curriculum.

Upcoming Events

From the States