Last Reviewed by State Dept of Education: 11/1/2010
Contact us with corrections or additions Oregon Last Updated: 10/8/2014
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Curriculum and Instruction
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Health Education
     Last Updated: 12/28/2013

Mandate: OAR 581-022-1210 (2005) requires school districts to provide a K-12 instructional program that includes health education. OAR 581-022-1130 (2002) requires students to complete 1 unit of coursework in health education in order to graduate from high school.

Curriculum Content
The Health Education Standards (2005) provides standards for students in grades K-12 and provides benchmarks for grades 3, 5, 8, and high school in nine specific areas. OAR 581-022-1210 requires each district to have a planned K-12 instructional program with common curriculum goals and content standards in health education.

State Assessment Requirement
None.

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Physical Education
     Last Updated: 9/18/2013
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Mandate: OAR 581-022-1210  (2005) requires school districts to provide a K-12 instructional program that includes physical education.  OAR OAR 581-022-1130 OAR (2002) requires high school students to complete 1 unit of coursework in physical education in order to graduate. ORS 329.496 (2007) requires that every public school student in grades K-8 will participate in physical education for the entire school year.  Students in grades K-5 are required to participate in physical education for at least 150 minutes each week.  Students in grades 6-8 are required to participate in physical education for at least 225 minutes each week.  School districts are required to devote at least 50 percent of physical education class time to actual physical activity.  Full compliance is required by the 2017-2018 school year.

 
     Last Updated: 9/18/2013

Exemptions: OAR 581-022-1910(1996) allows a district to excuse a pupil from a state required program or learning activity to accommodate for a student's disability or religious beliefs. Procedures are outlined in the Rule.

Curriculum Content: ORS 329.496 (2007) requires  school districts to offer instruction in physical education that meets the academic content standards for physical education adopted by the State Board of Education under ORS 329.045 (2003). The Physical Education Standards (2005) provide benchmarks for grades 3,5,8, and high school. 
 
Asthma Awareness Education
     Last Updated: 1/30/2006

Not specifically required.

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Emotional, Social, and Mental Health Education
     Last Updated: 11/9/2010

The Health Education Standards (2005) recommend that the mental, social, and emotional health education be taught in grades K-12. These standards provide benchmarks for the acquisition of knowledge and skills related to mental, social, and emotional health such as stress and stress management, healthy expression of emotions, emotional changes in adolescence, positive self-image, pre-social behaviors, and the causes and effects of, and coping with, depression.

Character Education: OAR 581-022-1020 (1997) requires that students in grades K-12 be instilled with the core ethical values that our diverse society shares and holds important, including but not limited to, respect, responsibility, caring, trustworthiness, justice and fairness, and civic virtue and citizenship".

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HIV, STD, and Pregnancy Prevention Education
     Last Updated: 5/26/2009

Mandate: ORS 336.455 (2009) requires each school district to provide age-appropriate, medically accurate human sexuality education courses in all elementary and secondary schools as a part of the health education curriculum. Instruction must include information about responsible sexual behavior and the risks of exposure to HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and other infectious or sexually transmitted diseases. ORS 336.455 (2009) and OAR 581-022-1440 stress the promotion of abstinence for school age youth as the most effective way to prevent pregnancy, however, not to the exclusion of materials and instruction on other contraceptive and disease reduction measures. Human sexuality education courses must acknowledge the value of abstinence while not devaluing or ignoring those young people who have had or are having sexual intercourse.

OAR 581-022-1210 (2005) requires school districts to provide instruction in infectious diseases, including AIDS/HIV and Hepatitis B. ORS 336.035 (1993) allows for instruction in sexually transmitted diseases. OAR 581-022-1440 (2007) provides further guidance, detailing the required instruction in comprehensive human sexuality education, infectious diseases, including HIV, AIDS, and Hepatitis B and C for elementary, middle, and high school students. At a minimum, instruction must be provided annually for all students in grades 6 through 8, and at least twice grades 9 through 12. 

Curriculum Content: The state does not require schools to follow a specific curriculum, nor does it provide a suggested curriculum. Further, the state does not have policies regarding limitations on HIV, STD, or pregnancy prevention education.

Parental Approval: The state allows parents or guardians to remove students from portions of health education per ORS 336.465 (1993) and OAR 581-022-1440 (an "opt-out" policy).

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Nutrition Education
     Last Updated: 11/9/2010

The Health Education Standards (2005) recommend that students in grades K-12 acquire the knowledge and skills to understand and practice healthful nutrition.

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Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drug Use Education
     Last Updated: 11/9/2010

Alcohol: OAR 581-022-0413 (1989) requires each school district to develop a plan for a drug and alcohol prevention program. OAR 581-022-1210 (2005) requires district curriculum to include instruction in alcohol. The Health Education Standards (2005) recommend students in grades K-12 acquire the knowledge and skills to understand the physical, social, and emotional effects of alcohol and their use.

Tobacco: OAR 581-022-0413 requires each school district to develop a plan for a drug and alcohol prevention program that includes information about the harmful and illegal effects of tobacco use. The Health Education Standards (2005) recommend students in grades K-12 acquire the knowledge and skills to understand the physical, social, and emotional effects of tobacco and their use.

School districts also have the opportunity to receive grant awards from the state to implement tobacco prevention and education programs by complying with the requirements outlined in OAR 333-010-0340 (1997).

Drugs: OAR 581-022-0413 requires each school district to develop a plan for a drug and alcohol prevention program. OAR 581-022-1210 requires district curriculum to include instruction in drugs. The Health Education Standards (2005) recommend students in grades K-12 acquire the knowledge and skills to understand the physical, social, and emotional effects of drugs and their use. ORS 342.726 (2007) requires the Department of Education to develop and implement a program for K-12 of education to prevent the use of anabolic steroids and performance-enhancing substances. It also requires school districts to include information on anabolic steroids and performance-enhancing substances, including prevention strategies, strength-building alternatives and the understanding of health food labels, in health and physical education curricula.

OAR 581-022-0416  (2008) requires school districts to use evidence-based programs for the reduction in anabolic steroid and performance-enhancing substance abuse by high school athletes. 

 

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Injury and Violence Prevention Education
     Last Updated: 11/9/2010

The Health Education Standards (2005) recommend that violence prevention education be taught in grades K-12.

Bullying/Harassment: The Health Education Standards (2005) recommend students in grades K-12 be taught how to identify, handle, and report bullying and harassment and about its effect on health and safety.

Fighting/Gangs: The Health Education Standards (2005) recommend students in grades K-12 be taught non-violent conflict management skills, anger management, and how to avoid physical violence.

Suicide and Other Self-Abuse Prevention: The Health Education Standards (2005) recommend students in grades 6-12 be taught the warning signs of suicide and prevention methods, and that students in grades 4-12 be taught about the causes, effects, and symptoms of eating disorders.

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Staff
Requirements for All Educators Regarding Health Education
     Last Updated: 6/8/2008

Pre-service Requirement: OAR 584-038-0010 (1989) requires that the Basic Elementary teaching endorsement includes three quarter hours of health education and three quarter hours of physical education.

Professional Development: Chapter 618 Oregon Laws (2001) requires that the Center for School Safety board of directors to develop a plan identifying the training needs of instructional staff for classroom management to minimize disruptive and disorderly behavior.

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Requirements for Health Educators
     Last Updated: 9/18/2013

Pre-service Requirement: The minimum requirement for prospective health teachers in elementary, middle, and high school grades prior to licensure is a bachelor's degree and 42 hours of competence in health education. The specific details of initial licensure are outlined in OAR 584-038-0100 (1989) and 584-060-0011 (2002).

In addition to passing the required subject-matter, examinations for health education, and completing the required practicum experience, the requirements to add a health education endorsement onto any Initial or Continuing Teaching License are outlined in OAR 584-065-0070  (2005).

Professional Development
: OAR 584-090 outlines the requirements for ongoing professional development, which include completing the equivalent of 25 professional development units per year for full-time educators. OAR 584-038-0315 (2002) allows the renewal of a basic license upon verification of a successful experience or 9 quarter hours of additional preparation or completion of additional preparation applicable to a Standard Teaching License. In addition, OAR 584-038-0325 (2009) allows Basic Teaching Licenses with a subject matter endorsement(s) to be renewed for a period of three years for use in grades five through twelve when the applicant has completed additional preparation applicable to a Standard Teaching License.Basic Teaching Licenses with endorsementsin specific subject areas including health may also be renewed for use in preprimary through grade twelve. To retain authorization for teaching in a high school, holders of subject matter endorsements must complete 24 quarter or 16 semester hours toward standard licensure for renewal of the first Basic Teaching License and must qualify for a Standard Teaching License upon expiration of the second Basic Teaching License..

 

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Requirements for Physical Educators
     Last Updated: 9/18/2013

Pre-service Requirement: OAR 584-036-0015  (2005) states that an elementary subject matter endorsement in physical education is valid for self-contained classrooms and departmental assignments for grades preK-9, and also valid for teaching in the subject area in preK-12. Details of a basic elementary endorsement are found in OAR 584-0384-0010 (1989). All subject matter endorsements, except elementary, are valid for teaching physical education in grades 5-12. A basic physical education endorsement requires,  48 quarter hours in topic areas outlined in OAR 548-038-0230  (1989).

In addition to passing the required subject-matter, examinations for physical education, and completing the required practicum experience, the requirements to add a physical education endorsement onto any Initial or Continuing Teaching License are outlined in OAR 584-065-0060 (2005).

Professional Development
: OAR 584-090 outlines the requirements for ongoing professional development, which include completing the equivalent of 25 professional development units per year for full-time educators.  OAR 584-038-0315 (2002) allows the renewal of a basic license upon verification of a successful experience or 9 quarter hours of additional preparation or completion of additional preparation applicable to a Standard Teaching License. In addition, OAR 584-038-0325 (2009) allows Basic Teaching Licenses with a subject matter endorsement(s) to be renewed for a period of three years for use in grades five through twelve when the applicant has completed additional preparation applicable to a Standard Teaching License. Basic Teaching Licenses with endorsements in specific subject areas including physical education may also be renewed for use in preprimary through grade twelve. To retain authorization for teaching in a high school, holders of subject matter endorsements must complete 24 quarter or 16 semester hours toward standard licensure for renewal of the first Basic Teaching License and must qualify for a Standard Teaching License upon expiration of the second Basic Teaching License.
 
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Requirements for School Nurses
     Last Updated: 11/8/2010

Pre-service Requirement: OAR 584-021-0110 (1992) requires the completion of an approved program of preparation consisting of health services coursework and a practicum in a school setting, the possession of a baccalaureate degree, the successful completion of a state board of education examination, and a current registered nursing license in the state, which can be obtained after completing an approved professional nursing education program outlined in OAR 584-021-0120 (1993), for certification as a provisional school nurse.

Professional Development: OAR 584-048-0065 (1992) requires a recommendation from an approved program that is contingent upon the satisfactory completion of 9 quarter hours leading up to a Standard Personnel Service License.

Student-to-Nurse Ratio: HB2693 (2010) requires each school district ensure that the district has a sufficient number of licensed nurses  and school nurses to provide one licensed nurse or school nurse for every 225 "medically complex" students, one for every 125 "medically fragile" students, and one for every nursing-dependent student (as defined in the statute). In addition, each school district is encouraged to have one nurse for every 750 students in the district.

Requirements for Non-Certified Personnel to Administer Medication
     Last Updated: 9/20/2013

Pre-service Requirement: ORS 339.869 (2013) requires the State Board of Education to adopt rules for the administration of medications by trained school personnel which must include. training requirements.  The statute also requires school district boards to adopt policies and procedures consistent with these rules.  A school district board shall not require school personnel who have not received appropriate training to administer medication. ORS 433-800-830 (2013) requires the training curricula ffor administration of emergency epinephrine must include the following subjects: (1) Recognition of the symptoms of systemic allergic responses to insect stings and other allergens; (2) Familiarity with common factors that are likely to elicit systemic allergic responses; (3) Proper administration of an intramuscular or subcutaneous injection of epinephrine for severe allergic responses to insect stings and other specific allergens; and (4) Necessary follow-up treatment.

OAR 581-021-0037 (2010) also requires local districts to develop policies and procedures that provide forthe administration of prescription and non-prescription medication to students by trained school personnel, and the training of designated staff to administer medication under the written permission of a parent/guardian and instructions from a physician.  The policies must include a process to designate, train and supervise appropriate staff. “Training" under this rule is defined as yearly instruction provided by qualified trainers to designated school staff on the administration of prescription and nonprescription medications, based on requirements set out in guidelines approved by the Department of Education, including discussion of applicable district policies, procedures and materials.

Professional Development: OAR 581-021-0037 (2010) requires local districts to develop policies and procedures that provide for the administration of prescription and non-prescription medication to students by trained school personnel, and the training of designated staff to administer medication under the written permission of a parent/guardian and instructions from a physician.  The policies must include a process to designate, train and supervise appropriate staff. “Training" under this rule is defined as yearly instruction provided by qualified trainers to designated school staff on the administration of prescription and nonprescription medications, based on requirements set out in guidelines approved by the Department of Education, including discussion of applicable district policies, procedures and materials.

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Requirements for School Counselors
     Last Updated: 6/25/2008

Pre-service Requirement: OAR 584-017-0440 (1999) lists 14 specific competencies that are required for initial licensure. The basic counselor endorsement's minimum requirements, per OAR 584-044-0011 (1998), are a master's degree from an Oregon approved counselor education program and completion of both a teaching and counseling practica. OAR 584-036-0025 (1995) requires a counselor endorsement for personnel assigned to at least a part-time position.

Professional Development: OAR 584-090-0050 (2000) requires school psychologists with a basic license to have one year of full-time successful experience during the life of the current license and have successfully completed a professional development plan. OAR 584-048-0065 (1992) requires a recommendation from an approved program that is contingent upon the satisfactory completion of 9 quarter hours leading up to a Standard Personnel Service License.

Student-to-Counselor Ratio: No state policy.

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Requirements for School Psychologists
     Last Updated: 6/29/2008

Pre-service Requirement: OAR 584-017-0350 (2002) lists 12 specific competencies that are required for initial licensure. OAR 584-017-0355 (2000) also requires passing PRAXIS test scores in the area of specialty and competency in psychological methods and foundations for school psychology. OAR 584-070-0211 (2001) requires a master's degree, the completion of a clinical practicum, and passing PRAXIS test scores and OAR 584-036-0025 (1995) requires a school psychologist endorsement issued by the Commission or psychologist license issued by the Oregon Board of Psychologist Examiners for employment in the district.

The basic counselor endorsement's minimum requirements, per OAR 584-044-0014 (1998), are a master's degree in an approved school psychologist program from an approved teacher education institution, 75 quarter hours of graduate preparation to develop five specified competencies, completion of a supervised, nine week, full-time public school practicum, have a minimum score on the NTE specialty area test for school psychology, and hold a current National School of Psychology Certificate from the National Association of School Psychologists.

Professional Development: OAR 584-090-0050 (2000) requires school psychologists with a basic license to have one year of full-time successful experience during the life of the current license and have successfully completed a professional development plan. OAR 584-048-0065 (1992) requires a recommendation from an approved program that is contingent upon the satisfactory completion of 9 quarter hours leading up to a Standard Personnel Service License.

Student-to-Psychologist Ratio: None specified.

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Requirements for School Social Workers
     Last Updated: 7/14/2008

Pre-service Requirement: None specified.

Professional Development: None specified.

Student-to-Social Worker Ratio: None specified.

Requirements for Food Service Personnel
     Last Updated: 7/14/2008

Pre-service Requirement: None specified.

Professional Development: None specified.

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Requirements for Athletic Coaches
     Last Updated: 11/9/2010

Pre-service Requirement: OAR 584-036-0010 (1995) requires a license for athletic coaches.

Professional Development: ORS 342.726 (2007) requires school district employees who are coaches or athletic directors to receive training once every four years on identifying the components of anabolic steroid abuse and use and prevention strategies for the use of performance-enhancing substances. 

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Health Promoting Environment
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Wellness Policies
     Last Updated: 7/23/2008

Additional Accountability Requirements: None

Additional Content Requirements: None

Guidance Materials: The Department of Education has provided LEAs with several documents for creating and implementing wellness policies, including a school wellness newsletter with tips, resources, and highlights of exemplary districts. A worksheet not only helps schools and districts decide on policy language and content but also helps them think through the reasoning behind those decisions in a logical manner. The Department further provides a work plan and timeline worksheet for mapping out deadlines and responsibilities for implementing the required steps of the local wellness policy. Oregon also provides the report of its Food Choices in Oregon Schools Task Force, which includes recommendations and evaluation data that are pertinent to crafting and implementing local wellness policies.

Other: None

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School Meals Program
     Last Updated: 8/4/2014

Adequate Time to Eat: No state policy.

School Breakfast
ORS 327.535 (1991) requires school districts that provide lunch to provide breakfast if 25 percent or more of the students at the site are eligible for free or reduced price lunches, or if the school qualifies for assistance under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.

Food Allergies: ORS 339.869 (2013) requires the State Board of Education, in consultation with the Oregon Health Authority, the Oregon State Board of Nursing and the State Board of Pharmacy to adopt guidelines for the management of students with life-threatening food allergies, which must include:

·       Standards for the education and training of school personnel to manage students with life-threatening allergies.

·       Procedures for responding to life-threatening allergic reactions.

·       A process for the development of individualized health care and allergy plans for every student with a known life-threatening allergy.

·        Protocols for preventing exposures to allergens


Farm-to-School: ORS 336.426 (2008) requires the Department of Education to establish the Farm-to-School and School Gardening Program. Specific responsibilities of the  Department: under this statute include assisting schools that participate in the USDA School Lunch and Breakfast Program in utilizing Oregon food products and produce from school gardens; providing information to districts on how farm-to-school and school garden projects may help implement wellness policies mandated by the USDA; working with the State Department of Agriculture to develop farm-to-school related programs; promoting food- and garden-based educational activities; and others.

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Competitive Foods in School
     Last Updated: 10/8/2014
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Statute 336.423 (2007) restricts food and beverages sold in a school at all times during the regular or extended school day when the activities in the school are primarily under the control of the school district board.  This includes, but is not limited to, the time before or after classes are in session and the time when the school is being used for activities such as clubs, practice, student government or rehearsal.  The standards became applicable during the 2008-09 school year, with the exception of entrée and snack items (2009-10 school year).  Standards do not apply to food and beverage items sold as part of the USDA's National School Lunch or School Breakfast Program.

The following restrictions apply to any entrée item that is sold individually:

·         No more than 4 grams of fat per 100 calories

·         No more than 450 total calories

 

The following restrictions apply to any snack item defined as supplementing a meal, such as chips, crackers, onion rings, nachos, French fries, doughnuts, cookies, etc.):

·         No more than 35% of the total calories from fat (not applicable to legumes, nuts, nut butters, seeds, eggs, non-fried vegetables and cheese).

·         No more than 10% of total calories from fat (not applicable to nuts, eggs and cheese)

·         No more than 35% sugar by weight (not applicable to fruit and vegetables

·         No more than .5 grams of trans fat per serving

·         No more than 150 total calories if sold in a school in which the highest grade level in the school is grad 5 or less, 180 total calories in which the highest grade level is 6-8, and 200 total calories if which the highest grade level is 9-12.

 
Beverages sold in a school are limited to the following:

·         Water

·         Fruit or vegetable juice (no more than 8 oz for up to grade 5, 10 oz for grades 6-8, and 12 oz for grades 9-12) that is 100% juice with no added sweetners and contains no more than 120 calories per eight ounces.

·         Milk or a nutritionally equivalent milk alternative, provided the beverage item is not more than 8 oz for up to grade 5 (10 oz for grades 6-8 and 12 oz for grades 9-12) is fat free or low fat and, if flavored, contains no more than 150 calories per 8 ounces.

·         No calorie or low-calorie beverages containing no more than 10 calories per 8 ounces (grades 9-12 only)

·         A beverage that is not more than 12 oz and contains no more than 66 calories per 8 ounces (grades 9-12 only)

 

Fundraising Exemptions:

As of July 1, 2014, all fundraisers must meet USDA's Smart Snacks standards.

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Physical Activity Other Than Physical Education
     Last Updated: 9/18/2013

General Physical Activity Requirement: No state policy.

Recess and Physical Activity Breaks
: No state policy requiring or recommending recess.

Recess Before Lunch: No state policy.

Walking/Biking to School: ORS 
195.119 (2003) requires local governments to work with school district personnel to identify barriers and hazards to children walking or bicycling to and from school, and allows local goverments to  develop a plan to fund improvements designed to reduce the barriers and hazards identified.. HB 2742 (2005) establishes the Oregon Safe Routes to School program and fund within the Department of Transportation to assist communities in identifying and reducing barriers and hazards to children walking or bicycling to and from school.

Organized Sports
     Last Updated: 12/28/2010

Interscholastic Athletics: OAR 581-022-1680 (1996) states that school districts may only allow those organizations to administer interscholastic activities which have been approved by the state board.

Concussion and Sports-Related Head Injury:
SB348 (2009) requires each school district to ensure that coaches receive annual training on recognizing the symptoms of a concussion and seeking proper medical treatment for a person suspected of having a concussion. The Board must establish the requirements of the training and timelines to ensure that, to the extent practicable, every coach receives the training before the beginning of the season for the school athletic team. A coach may not allow a member of a school athletic team to participate in any athletic event or training on the same day that the member (1) Exhibits signs, symptoms or behaviors consistent with a concussion following an observed or suspected blow to the head or body, or (2) Has been diagnosed with a concussion. A coach may allow a member of a school athletic team who is prohibited from participating in an athletic event or training to participate in an athletic event or training (1) No sooner than the day after he or she experienced a blow to the head or body, (2) Only after they no longer exhibits signs, symptoms or behaviors consistent with a concussion, and (3) Upon receiving a medical release form from a health care provider. Oregon Adminstrative Rule 581-022-0421 (2010) further outlines these statuatory requirements.

Automated External Defibrillator (AED): SB1033 (2010) requires each school campus to have one AED on the premises. Schools have until 2015 to comply with this requirement.
 

Safe and Drug-Free Schools
     Last Updated: 10/8/2008

OAR 581-022-0606 (1996) requires school districts to develop and implement a written improvement plan for the district and each school, to include programs and policies for a safe school environment. Also, Chapter 617 Oregon Laws (2001) states "a safe and civil learning environment is necessary for students to learn and achieve high academic standards".

ORS 342.700 (1997) also requires school districts to adopt a policy on sexual harassment that meets the requirements under ORS 342.704 (1997) and have said policy posted in all grade 6-12 schools. The policy must prohibit all staff and students from participating in acts of sexual harassment, defined in detail in this statute.

Fighting/Gangs: ORS 339.250 allows district boards to authorize the discipline, suspension, or expulsion of any student who assaults either a school employee or another student. Teachers, administrators, and school employees and volunteers are also given authority to use reasonable physical force upon a student when necessary to maintain order in the school, classroom, or at a school activity or event on or off school property.

Weapons: ORS 339.250 requires school districts to have a policy requiring at least an one year suspension for students who bring, possess, conceal, or use a weapon to school, on school property under the jurisdiction of the district, to a school activity under the jurisdiction of the district, or to an interscholastic activity administered by a voluntary organization approved the State Board of Education. The incident must also be referred to the appropriate law enforcement agency.

ORS 339.315 (1999) further specifies that any employee of a public school district, an education service district, or a private school with reasonable cause to believe a person, while in school, is or has within 120 days possessed a firearm or destructive device must report this information to a school administrator, director, designee, or law enforcement within the county. An administrator, director, or designee must then promptly report such information to law enforcement within the county. If it has been more than 120 days, then law enforcement may but need not be contacted.

Drugs and Alcohol: No state policy.

Collaboration with Law Enforcement: Chapter 617 Oregon Laws calls for the Center for School Safety to develop a plan that engages local community agencies, including law enforcement agencies in assessing public school safety and student discipline procedures.

ORS 339.250 requires school districts to have a policy requiring cases of expulsion due to weapons use or possession by referred to the appropriate law enforcement agency. ORS 339.315 further requires any school employee, director, or administrator, public or a private, with reasonable cause to believe a person, while in school, is or has within 120 days possessed a firearm or destructive device to report this information to law enforcement within the county.

Bullying, Harassment and Hazing
     Last Updated: 11/9/2010

Bullying/Harassment: ORS 339.356 (2009) requires each school district to adopt a policy prohibiting harassment, intimidation or bullying and prohibiting cyberbullying. Policies must include definitions of harassment, intimidation, bullying and cyberbullying consistent with ORS 339.351 (2009), definition of "protected class" consistent with ORS 339.351 (2009), description of expected behavior, consequences and remedial action for those committing acts, uniform procedures for reporting, and uniform procedures for investigation, response to acts and requested review of response to a report. ORS 339.351 (2009) defines cyberbullying as the use of any electronic communication devised to harass, intimidate or bully."  It defines harassment, intimidation or bullying as any act that substantially interferes with a student's educational benefits, opportunities or performance, that takes place on or immediately adjacent to school grounds, at any school-sponsored activity, on school-provided transportation or at any official school bus stop, and that has the effect of physically harming a student or damaging their property, or creating a hostile educational environment."

ORS 339.250 (2001) states that harassment of another student or a school employee is grounds for suspension or expulsion.

ORS 342.700 (1997) also requires school districts to adopt a policy on sexual harassment that meets the requirements under ORS 342.704 (1997) and have said policy posted in all grade 6-12 schools. The policy must prohibit all staff and students from participating in acts of sexual harassment, defined in detail in this statute.

Cyberbullying:  ORS 339.356 (2009) requires each school district to adopt a policy prohibiting harassment, intimidation or bullying and prohibiting cyberbullying. Policies must include include definitions of harassment, intimidation, bullying and cyberbullying consistent with ORS 339.351 (2009), definition of "protected class" consistent with ORS 339.351 (2009), a description of expected behavior, consequences and remedial action for those committing acts, uniform procedures for reporting, and uniform procedures for investigation, response to acts and requested review of response to a report. ORS 339.351 (2001) defines cyberbullying as the use of any electronic communication devise to harass, intimidate or bully."  

Hazing: No state policy addressing elementary or secondary schools.

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Crisis Management/Emergency Response
     Last Updated: 8/4/2008

Response and Management Plans: School health services, per OAR 581-022-0705 (1996), are required to have a written plan for response to medical emergencies for each building in keeping with OAR 581-022-1420 (1996), which requires plans to also address any emergency situation.

Reporting Incidents of Violence: Chapter 617 Oregon Laws (2001) requires school districts to adopt policies for reporting incidents of bullying, harassment, and intimidation. ORS 339.315 (1999) further requires any school employee, director, or administrator, public or a private, with reasonable cause to believe a person, while in school, is or has within 120 days possessed a firearm or destructive device to report this information to law enforcement within the county.

Tobacco Use
     Last Updated: 4/28/2008

OAR 333-015-0030 (2002) implements the Oregon Clean Air Act by prohibiting smoking in public places, defined as any enclosed indoor area including educational facilities. OAR 333-015-0040 (2002) further requires signs to be posted prominently at each outside entrance of a public place that use either the "no smoking" symbol or the words "No Smoking."

     Last Updated: 4/28/2008
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ORS 339.865 (1993) and OAR 581-021-0110 (2004) does not permit any person under the age of 18 to possess tobacco products on school grounds, in school facilities or at school-sponsored activities. OAR 581-021-0110 also prohibits the possession of tobacco products by students in any building, facility or vehicle owned or leased by the school district or charter school and by January 01, 2006, each district is required to establish policies and procedures to implement and enforce this rule for all students, staff, and visitors.

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Air Quality
     Last Updated: 1/30/2006

No state policy.

Pesticide Use
     Last Updated: 1/30/2006

House Bill 3402 (2001) requires school districts to utilize the least toxic effective pest management method at school sites and provide staff and parents/guardians of students enrolled in the school written notification annually of all pesticides expected to applied at the school in the upcoming year. The school district is also required to post warning signs in each area of the school site where pesticides were applied.

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Playground/Facility Safety
     Last Updated: 1/30/2006

No state policy.

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Student Services
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Screening for Health Conditions
     Last Updated: 7/1/2010

Vision and Hearing: OAR 581-022-0705 (1996) requires school districts to provide vision and hearing screening.

Chronic Health Conditions: No state policy.

Body Mass Index (BMI) Screening: No state policy.

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Administration of Medications
     Last Updated: 10/14/2013

Staff Administration: ORS 339.869 (2013) requires the State Board of Education to adopt guidelines for the administration of prescription and nonprescription medication to students, including training requirements for school personnel.  The statute also requires local school district boards to adopt policies and procedures consistent with these rules.  A school district board shall not require school personnel who have not received appropriate training to administer medication. It also requires the Board to adopt rules for the administration of premeasured doses of epinephrine by school personnel trained as provided by ORS 433.815 to any student or other individual on school premises who the personnel believe in good faith is experiencing a severe allergic reaction, regardless of whether the student or individual has a prescription for epinephrine.  ORS 339.869 (2013) allows a person who has received training according to ORS 433.815 to acquire a premeasured dose of epinephrine for use in cases of emergency administration when a licensed health care professional is not immediately available.

OAR 581-021-0037  (2010),  also requires local districts to develop policies and procedures that provide for 1) the administration of prescription and non-prescription medication to students by trained school personnel, 2) the training of designated staff to administer medication under the written permission of a parent/guardian and instructions from a physician and 3) emergency medical response to life-threatening effects and reactions. 

ORS 339.870 (2001) and ORS 339.871 (2007) exempts school personnel from liability as a result of the administration of prescription  or nonprescription medications, or as a result ofgood-faith assistance of a student’s self-administration of medication, respectively, if the administration or assistance is in accordance with written permission and instructions of the student’s parent, guardian or Oregon licensed health care professional.. 

Self-Administration of Asthma Medication
: ORS 339.866 (2007) requires a school district board to adopt policies and procedures that provide for self-administration of medication for students in grades K-12 with asthma or severe allergies.  Self-administration is permitted in school, at a school-sponsored activity, while under the supervision of school personnel, in before- or after-school programs on school-owned property, and in transit to or from school or school-sponsored activities. The policies and procedures shall: (1) Require prescription, instruction on proper use and a written treatment plan from a health care professional, (2) Require the submission of any written documentation required by the school by parents of a student, including those related to liability, (3) Require the storage of backup medication in a location to which the student has immediate access, and (4) Allow a school to revoke its permission for a student to self-administer medication in cases of irresponsibility or abuse. The statute prohibits a school board from requiring school personnel who have not received appropriate training to assist a student with asthma or a severe allergy with self-administration of medication.

ORS 339.869 (2009) requires the State Board of Education to adopt guidelines for student self-medication. The statute also requires school district boards to adopt policies and procedures consistent with state guidelines. OAR 581-021-0037  (2010) also requires local districts to develop policies and procedures guidelines for self-medication by a student.  These policies must include: safe storage, handling, monitoring supply and disposing of medications; record keeping and reporting of medication administration, including errors in administration; emergency medical response for life threatening side effects and allergic reactions; and student confidentiality.

Self-Administration of Anaphylaxis Medication
: ORS 339.866 (2007) requires a school district board to adopt policies and procedures that provide for self-administration of medication for students in grades K-12 with asthma or severe allergies.  Self-administration is permitted in school, at a school-sponsored activity, while under the supervision of school personnel, in before- or after-school programs on school-owned property, and in transit to or from school or school-sponsored activities. The policies and procedures shall: (1) Require prescription, instruction on proper use and a written treatment plan from a health care professional, (2) Require the submission of any written documentation required by the school by parents of a student, including those related to liability, (3) Require the storage of backup medication in a location to which the student has immediate access, and (4) Allow a school to revoke its permission for a student to self-administer medication in cases of irresponsibility or abuse. The statute prohibits a school board from requiring school personnel who have not received appropriate training to assist a student with asthma or a severe allergy with self-administration of medication.

ORS 339.869 (2009) requires the State Board of Education to adopt guidelines forstudent self-medication. The statute also requires school district boards to adopt policies and procedures consistent with the state guidelines. OAR 581-021-0037  (2010) also requires local districts to develop policies and procedures guidelines for self-medication by a student.  These policies must include: safe storage, handling, monitoring supply and disposing of medications; Record keeping and reporting of medication administration, including errors in administration; emergency medical response for life threatening side effects and allergic reactions; and student confidentiality.

Psychotropic Medications: ORS 339.873 (2003) prohibits a K-12 public school employee from recommending to a parent/guardian that the student seek a prescription for a medication that will affect or alter the thought processes, mood, or behavior of the student. A school employee may also not require a child to obtain a prescription for a substance covered by the federal Controlled Substances Actas a condition of attending school, receiving an evaluation to determine eligibility for early childhood special education or special education, or receiving early childhood special education or special education services.

Storage and Record-keeping: OAR 581-021-0037 requires local districts to develop policies and procedures guidelines for the safe storage and handling of medications and record keeping of administration.

Medical Emergencies: OAR 581-022-0705 requires every school building to have a written plan for responding to medical emergencies. 

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Counseling and Mental Health Services
     Last Updated: 8/14/2008

Requirement to Provide Services: OAR 581-022-1510 (1996) requires each district and school to provide a guidance and counseling program.

Suicide Prevention: No state policy.

Identification of Students with Mental or Emotional Disorders: OAR 581-022-1510 requires school guidance and counseling programs to identify each student's guidance and counseling needs.

HIV, STD, and Pregnancy Testing and Counseling: No state policy.

Immunity of Liability: No state policy.

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Immunization
     Last Updated: 5/18/2011

Detailed, current information about immunization requirements by state is maintained by the National Network for Immunization Information.  Select your state from the drop down box under Search for State Vaccine Requirements for School Entry."

Exemptions: ORS 433.267 (2005) allows for exemption from immunization requirements under the following circumstances: (1) Submission of a statement signed by a physician or representative of the local health department indicating that the child should be exempted from receiving specified immunizations because of an indicated medical diagnosis, or (2) Submission of a signed statement by the parent indicating that the child has not been immunized because the child is being reared as an adherent to a religion the teachings of which are opposed to such immunization.

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Accommodation
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Staff with HIV
     Last Updated: 2/21/2006
OAR 581-022-0705 (1996) directs local districts to adopt policies and/or administrative procedures concerning employees with communicable diseases, including but not limited to Hepatitis B (HBV), Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).
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Students with HIV
     Last Updated: 2/21/2006

OAR 581-022-0705 (1996) directs local districts to adopt policies and procedures that address the admission, placement, and supervision of students with communicable diseases, including but not limited to Hepatitis B (HBV), Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

Pregnant or Parenting Students
     Last Updated: 1/30/2006

ORS 336.640 (2001) states that no pregnant or parenting student shall be excluded from public schools solely on the basis of pregnancy or parenthood. Further, it requires local districts to provide alternative programs and services to pregnant or parenting students, including counseling, life skills and parenting education, childcare, transportation, career development, and health and nutrition services. Local school districts must also provide schedules that address the individual needs of pregnant and parenting students.

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Individual Health Plan for Students
     Last Updated: 2/21/2006

OAR 581-015-0005 (2003) defines “children with disabilities” to include those with chronic health problems that adversely affect a child’s educational performance due to the health impairment. OAR 581-015-0068 (2003) requires these health-related disabilities to be included as a statement describing the health services to be provided to the child in an individualized education program.

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Coordination/ Implementation
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Coordinating or Advisory Councils
     Last Updated: 8/18/2008

State-level: Chapter 617 Oregon Laws (2001) establishes the Center for School Safety that is charged with developing a plan to assess public school safety and student discipline.

Local-level: The state does not mandate the formation of a school health coordinating or advisory council. However, Oregon has a Coordinated School Health Interagency Team comprised of program staff representing the eight components of comprehensive school health and the CDC-identified risk behaviors.

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School Health Program Coordinators
     Last Updated: 11/9/2010

State-level: No state policy. However, Oregon has a Coordinated School Health Interagency Team comprised of program staff representing the eight components of comprehensive school health and the CDC-identified risk behaviors.

Local-level: No state policy.

Confidentiality
     Last Updated: 8/21/2008

Student Health-Related Records: OAR 581-021-0037 (1999) requires local school districts to include in their policies and procedures discussion about student confidentiality related to the administration of medications. OAR 581-015-0055 (2000) also requires the confidentiality of student education records, defined as any record related to a student and maintained by an educational institution in OAR 581-021-0220 (1995).

Student Health-Related Services: No state policy.

Limitations on Student Surveys
     Last Updated: 1/30/2006

No state policy.

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