Last Reviewed by State Dept of Education: 12/1/2012
Contact us with corrections or additions Minnesota Last Updated: 8/4/2014
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Curriculum and Instruction
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Health Education
     Last Updated: 10/1/2012

Mandate: Statute 120B.021 (2005) requires health education and assigns the responsibility of developing standards to local districts.

Curriculum Content: Standards are to be developed locally. The state has developed health education standards and benchmarks (2010) to assist local districts as they develop their own standards.

State Assessment Requirement: Local districts are required to develop assessments for health education.

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Physical Education
     Last Updated: 11/22/2010

Mandate: Statute 120A.22 (2005) requires physical education for students between 7-16 years (duration and frequency not specificed) and assigns the responsibility of developing standards to local districts. However, the Healthy Kids Bill (2010) requires the Department of Education to adopt the National Association of Physical Education (NASPE) standards as statewide standards. Local districts are then required to adopt health and physical education standards, which must incorporate the NASPE standards. Although not outlined in code, precedence has determined that physical education must be taught at all grade levels in the elementary and middle/junior high levels, and must be taught at least once in high school.  The expectations are outlined in the Standards, Tests and Graduation Requirement Chart (2006).

Exemptions: The State Board of Education (no link available) requires all students to participate in physical education classes unless there is an appropriate written request (from a parent, guardian or medical practitioner) for a student not to participate. For exemption for six or more consecutive school days, the note must be from a medical practitioner.

Curriculum Content: Standards are to be developed locally.  The Healthy Kids Bill (2010) requires the Department of Education to adopt the National Association of Physical Education (NASPE) standards as statewide standards. Local districts are then required to adopt health and physical education standards, which must incorporate the NASPE standards.

Physical Fitness Assessment: Local districts are required to develop assessments for physical education.

Asthma Awareness Education
     Last Updated: 1/22/2006
Not specifically required.
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Emotional, Social, and Mental Health Education
     Last Updated: 5/14/2008

Statute 120B.021 (2005) requires health and physical education. In addition, Statute 120B.22 requires violence education be comprehensive, accurate, and age appropriate curriculum and include nonviolent conflict resolution, sexual, racial, and cultural harassment, self-protection, and student hazing that promotes equality, respect, understanding, effective communication, individual responsibility, thoughtful decision making, positive conflict resolution, useful coping skills critical thinking, listening and watching skills, and personal safety. In particular, school districts are to target early adolescents whose personal circumstances may lead to violent or harassing behavior.

Character Education: Statute 120B.232 (2005) encourages districts to make character development education to be offered as a class or integrated into other instruction as a part of establishing a positive school climate that promotes attentiveness, truthfulness, respect for authority, diligence, gratefulness, self-discipline, patience, forgiveness, respect for others, peacemaking, and resourcefulness. Federal funds are to be used first to the extent they are available.

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HIV, STD, and Pregnancy Prevention Education
     Last Updated: 5/21/2008

Mandate: Statute 121A.23 (2003) requires a program to prevent and reduce the risk of sexually transmitted infections and diseases, including but not exclusive to HIV and HPV. Each district must have "a comprehensive, technically accurate, and updated curriculum that includes helping students to abstain from sexual activity until marriage and, a targeting of adolescents, especially those who may be at high risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections and diseases, for prevention efforts."

Grade levels and amount of instructional time are not specified. The state also does not provide funds for HIV, STD, or pregnancy prevention activities.

Curriculum Content: Schools are not required to follow a set of standards or specific curriculum framework.

Parental Approval: Statute 120B.20 (1998) requires "each school district [to] have a procedure for a parent, guardian, or an adult student, 18 years of age or older, to review the content of the instructional materials to be provided to a minor child or to an adult student and, if the parent, guardian, or adult student objects to the content, to make reasonable arrangements with school personnel for alternative instruction" (an "opt-out" policy).

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Nutrition Education
     Last Updated: 5/11/2006

Although the state requires health and physical education, nutrition education is not specifically required.

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Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drug Use Education
     Last Updated: 5/16/2013

Alcohol: Not specifically required.

Tobacco: Not specifically required.

Drugs: Not specifically required.

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Injury and Violence Prevention Education
     Last Updated: 6/5/2008

Bullying/Harassment: Statute 120B.22 (2000) encourages each district to integrate a program for violence prevention into its existing curriculum that includes: a comprehensive, accurate, and age appropriate curriculum on sexual, racial, and cultural harassment, and student hazing; planning materials, guidelines, and other accurate information on prevention sexual, racial, and cultural harassment.

Fighting/Gangs: Statute 120B.22 encourages each district to integrate a program for violence prevention into its existing curriculum that includes a curriculum on nonviolent conflict resolution.

Suicide and Other Self-Abuse Prevention: Statute 120B.22 requires violence education be comprehensive, accurate, and age appropriate curriculum and include nonviolent conflict resolution, sexual, racial, and cultural harassment, self-protection, and student hazing that promotes equality, respect, understanding, effective communication, individual responsibility, thoughtful decision making, positive conflict resolution, useful coping skills, critical thinking, listening and watching skills, and personal safety. In particular, school districts are to target early adolescents whose personal circumstances may lead to violent or harassing behavior.

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Staff
Requirements for All Educators Regarding Health Education
     Last Updated: 9/4/2009

Pre-service Requirement: Statute 122A.66 (1998) requires all colleges preparing teachers to offer, and all students entering the teaching profession to complete, a program in the use and misuse of tobacco, alcohol, drugs and other chemicals.

Professional DevelopmentState Board of Education Rule 8710.7100 (2003) requires all teachers to obtain 125 hours of continuing education in their field every five years for re-licensure. State Board of Education Rule 8710.7200 (2005) specifies the areas for development, which include depression, excessive fears and anxiety, changes in behavior and performance, failure to develop peer relationships, impaired concentration and thinking, suicidal gestures, the potential connection to substance use, and knowledge of steps. Statute 122A.29 (2005) requires all educators to undergo continuing education in early warning signs of early-onset mental illness in children and adolescents.

Statute 122A.60 (2005) requires school boards to establish an advisory staff development committee to develop and adopt a staff development plan for improving student achievement. This plan must include ongoing staff development activities that aim to effectively teach and model violence prevention policy and curriculum that address issues of harassment and teach nonviolent alternatives for conflict resolution.

Statute 120B.22 (2005) encourages each district to provide ongoing in-service for district school personnel to help students identify violence in the family and community, so students may learn to resolve conflict in effective, nonviolent ways.

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Requirements for Health Educators
     Last Updated: 9/4/2009

Pre-service Requirement: The minimum requirement for prospective health teachers in elementary grades prior to licensure is a bachelor's degree, with no additional coursework in health. Details for licensure are outlined in State Board of Education Rule 8710.0300 (2002). Prospective health teachers in middle and high school are required to have a bachelor's degree, and to demonstrate knowledge and skills specific to health, as outlined in State Board of Education Rule 8710.4500 (2002).

Professional Development: State Board of Education Rule 8710.7100 (2003) requires all teachers to obtain 125 hours of continuing education in their field every five years for re-licensure.

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Requirements for Physical Educators
     Last Updated: 9/4/2009

Pre-service Requirement: State Board of Education Rule 8710.4700 (2002) requires prospective physical educators to have a bachelor's degree. Details for licensure are outlined in State Board of Education Rule 8710.0300 (2002).

Professional Development: State Board of Education Rule 8710.7100 (2003) requires all teachers to obtain 125 hours of continuing education in their field every five years for re-licensure.

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Requirements for School Nurses
     Last Updated: 9/4/2009

Pre-service Requirement: State Board of Education Rule 8710.6100 (2002) requires a candidate for licensure as a school nurse to hold a bachelor's degree in nursing from an accredited college or university, be currently certified as a public health nurse, and be licensed as a registered nurse. For licensure as a registered nurse, Statute 148.211 (2004) requires the completion of a course of study in a board approved nursing program and passing the board approved examination for professional nursing.

Professional Development: State Board of Education Rule 8710.7100 (2003) requires all teachers to obtain 125 hours of continuing education in their field every five years for re-licensure. Furthermore, nurses must meet the continuing education requirements of the Board of Nursing every two years.

Student-to-Nurse Ratio: Statute 121A.21 (2003) requires districts with 1000 pupils or more to employ at least one full-time licensed school nurse, contract with a public or private health organization or another public agency, or enter into another commission-approved agreement.

Requirements for Non-Certified Personnel to Administer Medication
     Last Updated: 6/18/2008

Pre-service Requirement: No specific state policy; however, Statute 148.171 (1999) allows licensed professional nurses to delegate nursing functions to other nursing staff.

Professional Development: No specific state policy; however, Statute 148.171 requires a licensed professional nurse to supervise and teach other nursing personnel.

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Requirements for School Counselors
     Last Updated: 9/4/2009

Pre-service Requirement: State Board of Education Rule 8710.6400 (2003) requires a candidate for school counselor to hold a master's degree or equivalent from a regionally accredited college or university and show verification of completing an approved school counseling program.

Professional Development: State Board of Education Rule 8710.7100 (2003) requires all teachers to obtain 125 hours of continuing education in their field every five years for re-licensure.

Student-to-Counselor Ratio: No state policy.

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Requirements for School Psychologists
     Last Updated: 9/4/2009

Pre-service Requirement: State Board of Education Rule 8710.6200 (2003) requires a candidate for licensure as a school psychologist to evidence the completion of a preparation program in school psychology accredited by the National Association of School Psychologists.

Professional Development: State Board of Education 8710.7100 (2003) requires all teachers to obtain 125 hours of continuing education in their field every five years for re-licensure.

Student-to-Psychologist Ratio: No state policy.

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Requirements for School Social Workers
     Last Updated: 9/4/2009

Pre-service Requirement: State Board of Education Rule 8710.6300 (2003) requires a candidate for licensure as a school social worker to hold a baccalaureate or master's degree in social work from a program accredited by the Council on Social Work Education and be currently licensed in Minnesota to practice as a social worker under the Board of Social Work.

Professional Development: State Board of Education Rule 8710.7100 (2003) requires all teachers to obtain 125 hours of continuing education in their field every five years for re-licensure.

Student-to-Social Worker Ratio: No state policy.

Requirements for Food Service Personnel
     Last Updated: 12/10/2010

Pre-service Requirement: State Board of Education Rule 4626.2010  requires a certified food manager must be present in each school preparation kitchen. Certification requires the completion of an approved food manager course and passing an approved food manager exam administered by the Minnesota Department of Health.

Professional Development: State Board of Education Rule 4626.2015, four hours of continuing education are required every three years for re-certification.

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Requirements for Athletic Coaches
     Last Updated: 5/15/2008

Pre-service Requirement: Statute 122A.33 (2005) allows school districts to employ a non-licensed, non-degreed person as a coach if he/she verifies completion of instruction in first aid and the care/prevention of athletic injuries (6 quarter credits or 60 clock hours of instruction) and a coaching methods or theory course. SB 2369 (2008) reqiores a school hiring authority to requst a criminal history background check on all individuals, except enrolled student volunteers, who are offered the opportunity to offer athletic coaching services or other extracurricular services to a school, regardless of whether or not compensation is paid.

Professional Development: No state policy.

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Health Promoting Environment
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Wellness Policies
     Last Updated: 11/26/2011

Additional Accountability Requirements: None

Additional Content Requirements: None

Guidance MaterialsThe Department of Education has published the following guidance documents for the development and implementation of local wellness policies. Local Wellness Policy Resources provides tools and worksheets that can be used and modified by School Food Authorities to develop, analyze, communicate and measure their local wellness policy. From Policy to Action, Steps to Implementing Your Local Wellness Policy (2007) is a a step-by-step resource guide to local wellness policy implementation and measurement of progress. Local Wellness Policy Implementation Overview provides an overview on wellness policy implementation using PowerPoint with notes that can be modified for use with committees and parent groups.

Other: The Department of Education's local school wellness policies are monitored as part of the School Nutrition Program administrative review by department compliance and assistance staff. The monitoring specifically focuses on policy approval by the school board, inclusion of each component of Section 204, description of a person responsible and an evaluation plan.

The Healthy Kids Bill (2010) requires schools to post the local school wellness policy on its website, when available.

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School Meals Program
     Last Updated: 8/4/2014

Food Services: Statute 124D.111 (1977) provides state funds for school lunches and Statute 124D.119 (1997) provides state funds for Summer Food Service Program.

Statute 124D.118 (2005) encourages each school district to participate in the state-supported school milk program for kindergarteners. For those districts who choose to participate, they must provide one serving of milk every school day to each kindergarten student attending a public or nonpublic school. Students are not, however, required to accept the milk.

Adequate Time to Eat: No state policy.

School Breakfast: Statute 124D.117 (1998) requires school breakfast in public schools at which 33 percent of school lunches were served during the second preceding year were free or reduced-price. Statute 124D.1158 (2003) provides state funds for school breakfast and requires that breakfast be provided at no charge to students eligible for reduced-price meals.

Food Allergies:  Statute 123D.114 (2000) requires public school districts and nonpublic schools participating in the School Lunch Program or Breakfast Program to make available to lactose intolerant students, upon a written request of the parent, lactose reduced milk; milk fortified with lactase in liquid, tablet granular or other form; or milk to which lactobacillus acidophilus has been added. 

Farm-to-School: No state policy.

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Competitive Foods in School
     Last Updated: 6/5/2014

The Healthy Kids Bill (2010) establishes the Healthy Kids Award program to reward K-12 schools that implement policies and practices that create opportunities for students to be physically active and make healthy food choices throughout the school day. The program also seeks to integrate nutrition education and healthy food and beverage choices throughout the school environment, including classrooms, cafeteria, vending, school stores, and fund-raising.The program requirements align with the Institute of Medicine's guidelines for school food and beverages.

 

Fundraising Exemptions:

As of July 1, 2014, all fundraisers must meet USDA's Smart Snacks standards.  According to the Smart Snacks page MN Department of Education's School Nutrition Programs website, local education agencies may request approval for a case-by-case exemption from Smart Snack fundraising standards. The department is in the process of developing a “special circumstances” fundraiser exemption for use in limited situations.  

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Physical Activity Other Than Physical Education
     Last Updated: 12/20/2010

General Physical Activity Requirement: No state policy requiring physical activity. However the Healthy Kids Bill (2010) establishes the Healthy Kids Award program to reward K-12 schools that implement policies and practices that create opportunities for students to be physically active and make healthy food choices throughout the school day. The program seeks to integrate physical activity into non-physical education classes, recess and extracurricular activities throughout the day in addition to the physical education received in physical education classes.

Recess or Physical Activity Breaks: The Healthy Kids Bill (2010) encourages the Department of Education to develop guidelines that local districts can adopt to promote quality recess practices and behaviors that engage all students, increase their activity levels, build social skills, and decrease behavioral levels.

Recess Before Lunch: No state policy.

Walking/Biking to School: No state policy.

Organized Sports
     Last Updated: 6/15/2011

Interscholastic Athletics: Statute 121A.04 (2003) requires each educational institution to provide equal opportunities for both sexes to participate in its athletic program.

Concussion and Sports-Related Head Injury: Code 121A.37 (2011) requires the appropriate sports governing body to work with public and nonpublic school coaches, officials, and youth athletes and their parents or guardians to make information available about the nature and risks of concussions.  Requirements of the information are outlined in the statute. The sports governing body must provide access to the Concussion in Youth Sports online training program, and each school coach and official involved in youth athletic activities must receive initial online training and online training at least once every three school years thereafter.  At the start of each school year, school officials must make information available about the nature and risks of concussion to youth athletes and their parents or guardians. A coach or official must remove a youth athlete from participating in any youth athletic activity when they exhibit signs, symptoms or behaviors consistent with a concussion or is suspected of sustaining a concussion. Once removed from play, the youth athlete may not return to the activity until they no longer exhibit signs, symptoms or behaviors consistent with a concussion. In addition, they must be evaluated by a provider trained and experienced in evaluating and managing concussions. The provider must provide written permission to return to play.

Automated External Defibrillator (AED): No state policy.

Safe and Drug-Free Schools
     Last Updated: 11/26/2011

Statute 121A.03 (2000) requires each school board to adopt a model sexual, religious, and racial harassment and violence policy. The Department of Education has a Model Sexual, Religious and Racial Harassment and Violence Policy (2006) for districts to follow.  Statute 121A.035 (1999) requires school boards to adopt a district crisis management policy. The policy must include an individual district's plan to respond to potential crisis situations such as natural disasters, hazardous materials, and weapons in schools.

Statute 121A.45 (2004) allows a pupil to be dismissed from school for willful conduct that endangers the pupil or other pupils or surrounding persons or the property of the school. Similarly, Statute 121A.61 (2003) allows the removal of a student from class for willful conduct that endangers themselves, other students, surrounding persons, or school property. Statute 121A.582 (2001) allows a teacher, principal, other school employee, school bus driver, or other agent of the district to use reasonable force under necessary circumstances to correct or restrain a student or prevent bodily harm or death to another. The Statute presents a defense for an authority figure that exercised reasonable force.

Fighting/Gangs: The Comprehensive School Safety Guide (2008) provide guidelines for school districts addressing procedures applying to close physical confrontations that could result in significant physical threat.

Weapons: Statute 121A.44 (1998) requires the expulsion of a pupil for a period of at least one year for having brought a firearm to school. On a case-by-case basis, the school board may modify an expulsion. Statute 121A.06 (2005) requires the commissioner, in consultation with criminal and justice policy groups, to develop a standardized reporting form for incidents involving the use or possession of a dangerous weapon in school zones.

Drugs and Alcohol: Statute 121A.26 (1998) specifies that each public and non-public school participating in a chemical abuse program must have a pre-assessment team of school administrators and student services staff, and Statute 121A.29 (1998) requires teachers to report known or suspected chemical use by a student to the pre-assessment team. Statute 121A.28 (2005) requires a law enforcement agency to provide written notice of any drug incident involving a student violation to the chemical abuse pre-assessment team.

Collaboration with Law Enforcement:  Statute 121A.28 (2005) requires a law enforcement agency to provide written notice of any drug incident involving a student violation to the chemical abuse pre-assessment team.

Statute 121A.05 requires school boards to have a policy requiring appropriate school officials to refer pupils who bring a firearm to school unlawfully to criminal justice or the juvenile delinquency system.

Bullying, Harassment and Hazing
     Last Updated: 3/30/2012

Bullying/Harassment: Statute 121A.03 requires each school board to adopt a written harassment, intimidation and bullying and violence.   The policy must prohibit bullying, intimidation, violence or a pattern of harassment against any person or group based on the actual or perceived characteristics of the person or group, or an association with a person or group, including electronic forms and those involving the internet. Statute 121A.0695 requires the policy policy must be conspicuously posted throughout each school building, given to district employees and independent contractors, and included in each school's student handbook. Each school must further develop a process for discussing the policy with students and employees. Added in 2005, the policy may encourage violence prevention and character development education programs to prevent and reduce policy violations.  SB646 (2007) states that the intimidation and bullying policy required by 121A.0695 (2005) must address intimidation and bullying in all forms, including electronic forms and forms involving Internet use.

Cyberbullying: Statute 121A.03 (2009) states that the intimidation and bullying policy required by 121A.0695 (2005) must address intimidation and bullying in all forms, including electronic forms and forms involving Internet use.

Hazing: Statute 121A.69 (2003) requires each school board to adopt a written policy governing student or staff hazing that applies to student behavior on or off school property and during and after school hours. The policy must include reporting procedures and disciplinary consequences for violations, and must be included in the student handbook.

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Crisis Management/Emergency Response
     Last Updated: 11/26/2011

Response and Management Plans: Statute 121A.035 (1999) requires school boards to adopt a district crisis management policy. The policy must include an individual district's plan to respond to potential crisis situations such as natural disasters, hazardous materials, and weapons in schools. Districts may use the  Comprehensive School Safety Guide (2008) as a guide.

Reporting Incidents of Violence: Statute 121A.05 (1998) requires a school board to have a policy requiring a school official to refer a pupil who brings a firearm to school unlawfully to the criminal justice or juvenile delinquency system.

Statute 121A.06 (2005) requires the commissioner of education, in consultation with the criminal and juvenile information policy group to develop a standardized reporting form to be used by schools to report incidences involving the use or possession of a dangerous weapon in school zones. Statute 121A.69 (2003) requires each school board to adopt a written policy on hazing, which includes reporting procedures.

Statute 121A.29 (1998) requires "a teacher in a nonpublic school participating in a school district chemical use program, or a public school teacher, who knows or has reason to  believe that a student is using, possessing, or transferring  alcohol or a controlled substance while on the school premises or involved in school-related activities, shall immediately notify the school's chemical abuse preassessment team of this  information."

Tobacco Use
     Last Updated: 1/22/2006

Statute 144.412 (1987) prohibits smoking in areas where children are present and Statute 144.4165 (1999) specifically prohibits tobacco products in a public school. Statute 123B.93 (2003) further prohibits the advertisement of tobacco products on school buses. It is unlawful for youth under age 18 to use, possess, or sell tobacco as per Statute 609.685 (2000) of the Criminal Code.

Statute 121A.26 (1998) specifies that each public and non-public school participating in a chemical abuse program must have a pre-assessment team of school administrators and student services staff, and Statute 121A.29 (1998) requires teachers to report known or suspected chemical use by a student to the pre-assessment team.

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Air Quality
     Last Updated: 5/22/2008
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Statute 123B.885 (2002) requires school bus operators to minimize the idling of school bus engines and exposure of children to diesel exhaust fumes. Diesel school buses must be parked and loaded at sufficient distance to prevent diesel fumes from being drawn into the school in-take air systems.

     Last Updated: 10/23/2008

In order to receive health and safety revenue, Statute 123B.57 (2003) requires school districts to adopt a health and safety program which must include plans for hazardous substance removal, fire and life safety code repairs, regulated facility and equipment violations, and health, safety, and environmental management, including indoor air quality management. Statute 123B.71 (2005) also requires that a school board that is proposing to construct a facility to include in its proposal a description of how indoor air quality issues have been considered. 

Pesticide Use
     Last Updated: 1/22/2006
Statute 121A.30 (2003) requires the school board to notify parents, students, and employees if a school chooses to adopt an integrated pest management plan and control for using the least toxic pesticides with the least exposure to persons when practicable.
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Playground/Facility Safety
     Last Updated: 3/21/2007

No state policy.

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Student Services
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Screening for Health Conditions
     Last Updated: 7/1/2010

Vision and Hearing: No state policy.

Chronic Health Conditions: No state policy.

Body Mass Index (BMI) Screening: No state policy.

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Administration of Medications
     Last Updated: 7/20/2009

Staff Administration: Statute 121A.22 (2004) requires that local school districts, in consultation with a licensed school nurse or public health nurse, develop a policy on medication administration. Further, the Statute requires that the administration of medications may only occur when the parent or pupil requests school personnel to administer the medication or when it is allowed by the individual education plan of a child with a disability. The statute requires each medication to be stored in a pharmacy labeled container and administered by a school nurse according to the instructions on the label. Guidelines for Administration of Medication (2005) address issues for further consideration by school districts.

Self-Administration of Asthma Medication: Statute 121A.22 allows prescription asthma inhalers and nonsyringe injectors of epinephrine to be self-administered by pupils with written authorization from the parent or guardian. Statute 121A.221 (2001) requires the school nurse to assess the student's knowledge and ability to possess and use an asthma inhaler in school, or a parent may submit such an assessment from the prescribing health care provider.

Self-Administration of Anaphylaxis MedicationsStatute 121A.2205 requires public schools to work with a student's parent and school staff to develop and implement a written individualized health plan students who are prescribed a nonsyringe epinephrine injector. The plan must enable a student to possess an auto-injector or, if a parent or prescribing physician determines that a student is unable to possess the epinephrine, designate the school staff responsible for implementing the students health plan. The Statute provides immunity from liability for any act or failure to act, made in good faith, in relation to administration of epinephrine.

Self-Administration of General Medication: Statute 121A.222 (2005) allows secondary students to possess and use nonprescription pain relievers with annual written authorization from the student's parent. This does not apply to any drug or product containing ephedrine or pseudoephedrine. The permission may be revoked if misued.

Psychotropic Medications: Statute 125A.091 (2004) states, "A parent, after consulting with health care, education, or other professional providers, may agree or disagree to provide the parent's child with sympathomimetic medications "  This statute is within the provisions regarding special education dispute resolution and due process.  The same concept is repeated regarding student suspensions:  Statute 121A.41 (2005) - "the readmission plan must not obligate a parent to provide a sympathomimetic medication for the parent's child as a condition of readmission." The same parent rights pertain when dealing with truancy (Statute 260A.01 (2004)) and child protection (Statute 260C.163 (2005).

Storage and Record-keeping: The Guidelines for Administration of Medication (2005) address issues for consideration by school districts, including storage and record-keeping.

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Counseling and Mental Health Services
     Last Updated: 11/26/2011

Requirement to Provide Services: There is no specific state policy. However, the Comprehensive School Safety Guide (2008) provides guidelines for school districts to address crisis/emergency/disaster preparedness, including grief counseling.

Identification of Students with Mental or Emotional Disorders: Statute 121A.45 (2004) calls for arrangements for mental health screenings to be made for a pupil with the permission of the parent or guardian only if a pupil's removal from school exceeds 10 cumulative days in a school year. The district, however, is not required to pay for the mental health screening.

Substance Abuse: No state policy.

Suicide Prevention: Statute 121A.582 (2001) allows a teacher, principal, other school employee, school bus drive, or other agent of the district to exercise their authority in using reasonable force under necessary circumstances to correct, restrain a student, or prevent bodily harm or death to another. The Statute presents a defense for an authority figure that exercised reasonable force. The Comprehensive School Safety Guide (2008) provides guidelines for school districts addressing procedures that apply to close physical confrontations, which could result in significant physical threat, including suicide.

HIV, STD, and Pregnancy Testing and Counseling: No state policy.

Immunity of Liability: No state policy.

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Immunization
     Last Updated: 5/18/2011

Detailed, current information about immunization requirements by state is maintained by the National Network for Immunization Information.  Select your state from the drop down box under Search for State Vaccine Requirements for School Entry."

Exemptions: Statute 121A.15 (2005) allows for exemption from immunization requirements under the following circumstances: (1) A statement signed by a physician and submitted to the administrator or other supervisor of the school stating that an immunization is contraindicated for medical reasons or that laboratory confirmation of the presence of adequate immunity exists, or (2) Submission of a notarized declaration signed by the minor child's parent or guardian, or by an emancipated student, stating that the person has not been immunized because of conscientiously held beliefs of the parent or guardian or of the emancipated child.

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Accommodation
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Staff with HIV
     Last Updated: 5/11/2006
No state policy. Refer to the federal Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.
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Students with HIV
     Last Updated: 5/11/2006
No state policy. Refer to the federal Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.
Pregnant or Parenting Students
     Last Updated: 1/22/2006

No state policy.

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Individual Health Plan for Students
     Last Updated: 1/22/2006
Statute 121A.22 (2004) allows the administration of medications to be written in the individual education plan of a child with a disability. School districts must also prepare an IHP for students with life threatening allergies that may need emergency epinephrine. Statute 144.29 (1997) also requires school nurses to maintain a health record for each child.
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Coordination/ Implementation
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Coordinating or Advisory Councils
     Last Updated: 8/17/2008

State Level: No policy

Local Level: The state does not mandate the formation of a school health coordinating or advisory council, nor does it require schools or districts to do so. However, Statute 121A.27 (1998) requires that schools participating in a chemical abuse program establish a school and community advisory team.

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School Health Program Coordinators
     Last Updated: 8/18/2008

State Level: No policy

Local Level: No state policy.

Confidentiality
     Last Updated: 10/23/2008

Student Health-Related Records: All government data are governed by the State Data Practices Act. Statute 13.32 (2003) specifies that educational data, including student health data, are private. There are specific provisions for access to and use of the data by other educators, parents, in health and safety emergencies, and by juvenile courts. Statute 144.3351 (1998), for example, allows the commissioner of health to exchange immunization data without the consent of the patient if the person requesting access to the information provides services on behalf of the patient.

Statute 121A.75 (2002) states that any information received from the juvenile justice system (as defined in Statute 260B.171 (2003)) is private data and may not be disseminated by the teacher, counselor, staff member, administrator, substitute, or volunteer, except when necessary to protect students or staff and can only be shared with the student or the student's parent or guardian.

Student Health-Related Services: Statute 144.343 (2004) states that the consent of no other is required to render services to a minor for testing for or treating a pregnancy and conditions associated therewith, venereal disease, and alcohol and other drug abuse.

Registered nurses, psychologists, and social workers may not disclose content of or opinions about issues discussed with clients without specific consent of the client, even in court as described in statute 595.02, Subd 1(f). Any information related to child abuse/neglect is not included in this law regarding privileged communication law.

Limitations on Student Surveys
     Last Updated: 1/22/2006

No state policy.

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