Last Reviewed by State Dept of Education: 12/1/2012
Contact us with corrections or additions Michigan Last Updated: 6/2/2014
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Curriculum and Instruction
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Health Education
     Last Updated: 8/14/2011

Mandate: MCL 380.1502 (1993), referred to as Act 451, states that, health and physical education for pupils of both sexes shall be established and provided in all public schools of this state."

MCL 380.1278a (2003) (Michigan Merit Curriculum) requires one credit of health and physical education for graduation. Schools have flexibility in how they meet the requirement.

The Michigan State Board of Education's nonbinding Policy on Comprehensive School Health Education (2004) recommends that each school adopt, implement, and evaluate a research-based, theory driven comprehensive health education program and that schools provide at least 50 hours of health education at every grade, pre-K through 12. The state board also adopted the Policy on Quality Character Education (2004) to promote healthy, safe, and supportive learning environments.

Curriculum Content: The State Board of Education approved Health Education Content Standards and Benchmarks in 1998.  The Content Standards were revised in 2006. While the state does not require local districts to follow a specific curriculum, the Department of Education has developed Grade Level Content Expectations (GLCE) (2006) in health education for grades K-8 and High School Merit Credit Guidelines (2007). The State Board's Policy on Integrating Mental Health in School (2010) recommends schools implement a research-based health education curriculum such as the Michigan Model for Health.

State Assessment Requirement: No statewide exam is required. The Michigan State Board of Education recommends in its Policy on Comprehensive School Health Education (2004), that student work in health education courses be regularly assessed and graded using only performance-based items that are aligned with the health education content standards, curriculum, and instruction; that course grades should be determined in the same manner as other subject areas; and that such grades should be included in calculations of grade point average, class rank, and academic recognition programs such as honor roll.

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Physical Education
     Last Updated: 5/28/2013

Mandate: MCL 380.1502 (1993) states that "health and physical education for pupils of both sexes shall be established and provided in all public schools... each pupil attending public school in this state who is physically fit and capable of doing so shall take the course in physical education."

MCL 380.1278a (2007) (Michigan Merit Curriculum) requires 1 credit of health and physical education for gradution. Schools have flexibility in how they meet the requirement.

The State Board of Education's Policy on Quality Physical Education and Physical Activity in Schools (2012) recommends schools to offers instructional periods of physical education totaling 150 minutes per week at the elementary level and 225 minutes per week at the secondary level (middle and high school), for students of all abilities, including those with disabilities, and those in alternative education programs.

The Michigan State Board of Education's nonbinding Policy on Quality Physical Education (2003) recommends that instructional periods total 150 minutes per week (elementary) and 225 minutes per week (middle and high school). Their Model Local Wellness Policy (2005) recommends districts adopt policies promoting physical educational opportunities.

Exemptions: MCL 380.1278b allows a student to substitute one physical education and health credit to acquire extra English language arts, mathematics, science or world language credits, if a student has an approved personal curriculum.   In addition, students may test out of any state required graduation credit if the student earns: 1) a qualifying score, as determined by the department, on the assessments developed or selected for the subject area by the department; OR, 2) the student earns a qualifying score, as determined by the school district or public school academy, on one or more assessments developed or selected by the school district or public school academy that measure a student’s understanding of the subject area content expectations or guidelines that apply to the credit.  

MCL 380.1502(2) allows a school to credit a student’s participation in extracurricular athletics or other extracurricular activities involving physical activity (sports, marching band, etc) as meeting the physical education graduation requirement.  If a district does decide to use extracurricular physical activities to meet the physical education requirement, the student must still demonstrate proficiency in the physical education credit guidelines. Guidance is provided in the Michigan Merit Curriculum High School Graduation Requirements.

Curriculum Content: Schools are encouraged to use the Michigan Department of Education's Physical Education Content Standards and Benchmarks (1998). The Michigan Department of Education has assembled a useful website with many guidance and resource materials.

Physical Fitness Assessment: No state policy.

Asthma Awareness Education
     Last Updated: 1/21/2006

The State Board of Education recommends in its Policy on the Management of Asthma in Schools (2005) that asthma awareness and lung health education be part of health curricula and other curricula areas. The Policy also recommends that schools provide education programs on asthma basics, self-management, and emergency response for those students with asthma.

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Emotional, Social, and Mental Health Education
     Last Updated: 12/19/2012

The Critical Health Problems Act, MCL 388.382 (1969), requires all schools to implement a systematic and integrated program to educate youth with regard to critical health problems including mental health.

Michigan's Health Education Content Standards and Benchmarks (1998), K-8 Grade Level Content Expectations (GLCE) (2007) and High School Merit Credit Guidelines (2007) recommend minimum content standards for teaching students to identify indicators and know the interrelationship of mental, emotional, social, intellectual, and physical health. It also teaches stress management, effective interpersonal communication, and other social skills that enhance health in grades K-12. The Policy on Comprehensive School Health Education (2004) recommends that each school adopt, implement, and evaluate a research-based, theory driven curriculum focused on helping young people develop and practice personal and social skills in grades preK-12. The Michigan Model for Comprehensive School Health Education includes lessons on emotional and mental health.  The State Board Policy on Integrating Mental Health in Schools (2010) recommends that each school implement a research-based curriculum such as the Michigan Model for Health.

Character Education: The Policy on Quality Character Education (2004) recommends that schools adopt secular character education programs to teach fairness, trustworthiness, citizenship, and self-restraint in order to help students learn and foster the well being of democratic society. The Michigan Model for Comprehensive School Health Education includes lessons on emotional and mental health.

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HIV, STD, and Pregnancy Prevention Education
     Last Updated: 12/19/2012

Mandate: The Michigan legislature has passed several highly detailed laws regarding HIV/AIDS and sex education. A set of new laws and amendments to existing laws passed in 2004 are collectively known as Public Act 165. The Michigan Department of Education has assembled a useful website with many guidance and resource materials.

MCL 380.1169 (2004) requires that all public schools teach about dangerous communicable diseases, including, but not limited to, HIV/AIDS. The law does not specify grades or a minimum amount of instruction. MCL 380.1507 (2004) allows school districts to provide a broad sex education program so long as the courses are elective and are taught by qualified teachers. MCL 380.1507b (2004) spells out additional instructional requirements for required courses on HIV/AIDS and any optional sex education courses.

MCL 380.1506 (1977) requires that each district appoint a state-approved sex education program supervisor. MCL 388.1766 (1996) spells out financial penalties to districts that allow distribution of family planning methods or referrals to abortion services. MCL 388.1766a (2004) expands the list of violations subject to financial penalty and outlines a detailed parent complaint process through various layers of the education system.

The Michigan State Board of Education's nonbinding Policy on Comprehensive School Health Education (2004) calls for a "focus on behaviors that have the greatest effect on health, especially those related to sexual behaviors that lead to HIV, sexually transmitted disease, or unintended pregnancy, emphasizing their short-term and long-term consequences." The state board also adopted the Policy to Promote Health and Prevent Disease and Pregnancy (2003), which urges that the content of sexuality education programs be "medically accurate and include current information," and that programs be age, developmentally, linguistically, and culturally appropriate and consistent with research and principles of effective instruction. They recommend that districts administer a Parent/Community Sex Education Survey to ascertain local wishes.

Curriculum Content: MCL 380.1169 directs that HIV/AIDS instruction must address the principal modes of transmission and "the best methods for the restriction and prevention of these diseases." Teachers must "stress that abstinence from sex is a responsible and effective method for restriction and prevention of these diseases and is a positive lifestyle for unmarried young people." Teachers must be trained in the subject, and the state department of education is required to provide the training and develop and distribute medically accurate instructional materials.

MCL 380.1507 allows school districts to provide a broad sex education program so long as the courses are elective and are taught by qualified teachers. Instruction must stress the benefits of abstinence but districts are not prohibited from teaching about behavioral risk reduction strategies, including the use of condoms, within a sex education program. The law prohibits the teaching of abortion "as a method of reproductive health."

MCL 380.1507b spells out in great detail additional instructional requirements for required courses on HIV/AIDS and any optional sex education courses. In addition to a strong stress on abstinence, materials must be age-appropriate and "shall not be medically inaccurate." Instruction must include a discussion of the possible emotional, economic, and legal consequences of sex with direct references to numerous Michigan laws. Instruction must also address sexual harassment and exploitation; healthy dating relationships; and information about adoption services.

The Michigan State Board of Education adopted the Policy to Promote Health and Prevent Disease and Pregnancy, which urges that the content of sexuality education programs be "medically accurate and include current information," and that programs be age, developmentally, linguistically, and culturally appropriate and consistent with research and principles of effective instruction. The state board recommends that districts administer a Parent/Community Sex Education Survey to ascertain local wishes as to content.

Michigan’s model health education curriculum, the Michigan Model for Health® includes model curricula on HIV/STD prevention for Grades 4-5, 7-8, and 9-12.

Parental Approval: MCL 380.1506 requires that, "Upon the written request of a pupil or the pupil's parent or guardian, a pupil shall be excused, without penalty or loss of academic credit, from attending classes in which the subject of reproductive health is under discussion" (an "opt-out" policy). MCL 380.1507a (1996) allows parents to file "a continuing written notice" to excuse a pupil from such classes through the entire period of the student's enrollment in a school.

MCL 380.1169 requires that HIV/AIDS curricula must go through a formal approval process including two public hearings. MCL 380.1507 contains detailed requirements for advance notification of a sex education course to parents; parental opportunities to review materials in advance; and the composition and duties of district-level sex education advisory boards. MCL 388.1766 establishes financial penalties to districts that allow distribution of family planning methods or referrals to abortion services. MCL 388.1766a expands the list violations subject to financial penalty and outlines a detailed parent complaint process through various layers of the education system.

The Michigan State Board of Education adopted the nonbinding Policy to Promote Health and Prevent Disease and Pregnancy in 2003 that recommends local advisory boards meet semi-annually to review the progress of sexuality education programs and make necessary recommendations to the local school board.

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Nutrition Education
     Last Updated: 5/12/2008

The Model Local Wellness Policy (2005) recommends districts adopt policies where all students in preK-12 receive nutrition education aligned with the Health Education Content Standards and Benchmarks (1998) which have been revised to Health Education Content Standards (2006), K-8 Grade Level Content Expectations (GLCE) (2007) and High School Merit Credit Guidelines (2007).  Further, the Michigan State Board of Education's Policy on Comprehensive School Health Education (2004) calls for a "focus on behaviors that have the greatest effect on health, especially those related to nutrition emphasizing their short-term and long-term consequences."

Several agencies and outside organizations collaborated on the landmark The Role of Michigan Schools in Promoting Healthy Weight: A Consensus Paper (2001).

The Michigan Model for Health® includes nutrition lessons in each grade for K-6, 7-8 and high school.

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Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drug Use Education
     Last Updated: 5/21/2008

Alcohol: The State Board of Education recommends in its Policy on Comprehensive Health Education (2004) that students receive instruction on alcohol use with emphasis on its short-term and long-term consequences. The Michigan Model for Health® includes alcohol use prevention lessons.

Tobacco: MCL 388.383 (1970) authorizes the state department of education to create a critical health problems education program that includes instruction on the use and effects of tobacco. These programs include guidelines to help local school districts create comprehensive health education programs, as well as special in-service programs for health education teachers.

The State Board of Education also recommends in its Policy on Comprehensive Health Education that students receive instruction on tobacco use with emphasis on its short-term and long-term consequences. The Michigan Model for Health® includes tobacco use prevention lessons.

Drugs: The State Board of Education also recommends in its Policy on Comprehensive Health Education that students receive instruction on drug use with emphasis on its short-term and long-term consequences. The Michigan Model for Health® includes drug use prevention lessons.

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Injury and Violence Prevention Education
     Last Updated: 12/19/2012

Bullying/Harassment: The Policy on Quality Character Education (2004) recommends that schools adopt a secular character education program focused on developing positive relationships and prosocial norms to decrease negative behaviors such as bullying. The Michigan Model for Health® specifically referenced as a guide for schools to meet the State Board's recommendation, contains violence prevention modules with bullying and harassment specific lessons for grades K-12.

Fighting/Gangs: The Health Education Content Standards (2006), K-8 Grade Level Content Expectations (GLCE) (2007) and High School Merit Credit Guidelines (2007) recommend minimum content for teaching avoidance of conflicts and threatening situations in grades K-12, non-violent strategies to resolve conflicts in grades K-12, and how to solve interpersonal problems without harming others in grades 9-12.

Suicide and Other Self-Abuse Prevention: MCL 380.1171 (2006) encourages school districts to provide age-appropriate instruction for students and professional development for school personnel concerning the warning signs and risk factors for depression and suicide and the protective factors that help prevent suicide. The Health Education Content Standards (2006), K-8 Grade Level Content Expectations (GLCE) (2007) recommend minimum content standards for teaching students how to solve interpersonal problems without harming themselves in grades 9-12. The Michigan Model for Health® is specifically referenced as a guide for schools to meet the State Board's recommendation, and contains violence prevention and character education modules with suicide prevention lessons for grades 7-12.

The Policy on Quality Character Education recommends that schools adopt a secular character education program focused on developing positive relationships and prosocial norms to decrease negative behaviors.

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Staff
Requirements for All Educators Regarding Health Education
     Last Updated: 6/8/2008

Professional Development: In 2005, the State Board of Education adopted the Policy on the Management of Asthma in Schools that recommends professional development training for all school staff on asthma basics, asthma management, trigger management, and emergency response.

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Requirements for Health Educators
     Last Updated: 9/4/2009

Pre-service Requirement: The minimum requirements for prospective health teachers in elementary, middle, and high school grades prior to licensure in Michigan is a bachelor's degree in liberal arts and a minor in health for all grade levels. The specific details of initial licensure are outlined in statutes 390.1126 (1986) and 390.1127 (1986).

Professional Development: In 2004, the State Board of Education adopted the Policy on Comprehensive School Health Education that recommends all health education teachers receive ongoing professional development specifically related to health education.

In 2003, the State Board of Education adopted the Policy to Promote Health and Prevent Disease and Pregnancy that recommends school districts support on-going professional development for designated school staff in effective sexuality instruction." MCL 380.1169 (2004) requires that those teaching HIV/AIDS must be trained in the subject. The state department of education is required to provide training.

Michigan also encourages development through its Michigan Model for Comprehensive School Health Education by providing training, organization and support to local schools that implement school health programs.

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Requirements for Physical Educators
     Last Updated: 6/10/2008

Pre-service Requirement: No state policy.

Professional Development: All educators are required to receive five days of professional development.

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Requirements for School Nurses
     Last Updated: 6/12/2008

Pre-service Requirement: MCL 340.1166 (1976) specifies the criteria for school nurse certification as holding a valid registered nursing license issued by the state board of nursing and the acquiring of additional credits beyond those required for a registered nurse from an approved teacher education or nursing education institution. MCL 338.10301 (1989) requires the completion of an approved registered nurse education program, the possession of a bachelor's degree or an associate degree with a major in nursing, and the passing of the state approved NCLEX-RN examination.

Professional Development: MCL 340.1165 (1976) requires a school nurse to submit evidence of continuing attainment of theoretical and practical knowledge.

Student-to-Nurse Ratio: No state policy.

Requirements for Non-Certified Personnel to Administer Medication
     Last Updated: 6/18/2008

Pre-service Requirement: MCL 380.1178a (2002) requires the department of education to provide a model local policy that addresses the type and amount of training required for persons administering medication to students at school.

Professional Development: No state policy.

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Requirements for School Counselors
     Last Updated: 12/19/2012

Pre-service Requirement: State Board of Education Administrative Rule R 390.1301-1305 (1971) requires that a person employed in a public elementary or secondary school in a counseling role shall hold a valid Michigan teaching certificate with a counseling endorsement. A counseling endorsement requires the completion of an approved counseling education program of at least 18 semester hours of credit.

MCL 380.1233 (2000) also allows for counselors to either hold a school counseling endorsement or hold a master's degree earned after the completion of an approved school counselor education program, has completed the department's guidance counselor examination, and has been recommended by an approved school counselor education program. Alternatively, five or more years of experience serving as a school counselor in another state and successful completion of the department's guidance counselor examination qualifies a candidate.

Professional Development: No state policy.

Student-to-Counselor Ratio: No state policy; however, per the national model for standards of school counselors, Michigan recommends there be no more than a 300 students per one school counselor.

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Requirements for School Psychologists
     Last Updated: 9/4/2009

Pre-service Requirement:State Board of Education Administrative Rule R 380.201-209 (1992) requires a minimum of a preliminary school psychologist certificate per MCL 380.1251. A preliminary school psychologist certificate, valid for 3 years, requires a minimum of 45 hours in an approved program towards the school psychologist certificate, and the completion of at least a 600-hour internship with school-age pupils in an approved school psychologist program, of which 300 hours were in a school setting.

Professional Development: State Board of Education Administrative Rule R 380.201-209 requires the completion six credit hours in an approved program or the equivalent in approved state board continuing education units for certificate renewal.

Student-to-Psychologist Ratio: No state policy.

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Requirements for School Social Workers
     Last Updated: 12/20/2012

Pre-service Requirement: Pre-service Requirement: The minimum requirements for approval as a school social worker, a candidate must possess a master's degree from a state board-approved graduate school of social work program. Full approval may only be achieved after the satisfactory completion of 1 year in the school district. Details of the requirements are found in State Board of Education Rule R 340.1012 (1979).

Professional Development: No state policy. Continuing education exists to ensure that social workers remain up-to-date in the profession and are being trained in 21st century social work practices. Every "licensed" Michigan Social Worker is required to obtain 45 continuing education contact hours every three years in order to maintain an active license.
 
Student-to-Social Worker Ratio: No state policy. However, No Child Left Behind recommends one-master’s-degreed-school-social-worker-to-800-students ratio; the School Social Work Association of America recommends one master's-degreed social worker per 400 students).

LMSWs employed by school districts must meet the employment requirements for school social workers in the Revised School Code.
 
Requirements for Food Service Personnel
     Last Updated: 7/14/2008

Pre-service Requirement: No state policy.

Professional Development: No state policy.

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Requirements for Athletic Coaches
     Last Updated: 7/21/2008

Pre-service Requirement: No state policy.

Professional Development: No state policy.

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Health Promoting Environment
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Wellness Policies
     Last Updated: 7/23/2008

Additional Accountability Requirements: None

Additional Content Requirements: None

Guidance Materials: The Michigan State Board of Education Model Local Wellness Policy (2005) provides a comprehensive policy template for districts to meet Section 204 requirements that can be modified to address local governance issues. The model is aligned with the state's content standards and benchmarks

Other: None

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School Meals Program
     Last Updated: 8/18/2013

Food Services: The State Board of Education and the Department of Education recommend the following standards for foods and beverages served/sold through the Child Nutrition Program (School Breakfast and Lunch, Summer Feeding Programs, and After School Snack Programs) in its their Recommendations for all Foods and Beverages Available in Michigan Schools (2010): 

Recommendations for all Reimbursable Meals:

  • Calories: range based on Daily Reference Intakes
  • Fat: 25-35% of calories over the week
  • Trans fat: zero or less than or equal to .5 grams per serving as listed on the nutrition label or in manufacturer's specifications, for any food included on the school menu.


Recommendations for the following targets as total quantities for reimbursable meals throughout the school day:

  • Fiber 14-21 grams
  • Sodium 1,340-1,400 milligrams total throughout the school day reduced in a step-wise fashion so as to reach the target by 2020
  • Fruits and vegetables to increase over time to meet DGA.


Additional recommended standards for School Nutrition Programs:

  • For food-based menu planning systems, continue to offer a minimum of five components for lunch, four components for breakfast, and two for after school snacks.
  • Sodium: Salt shakers and packets shall not be available
  • Sugar: Sugar packets shall not be available
  • Legumes: Must be offered two times per week as either a meat/mealt alternate and/or vegetable component.


Adequate Time to Eat:  
The Model Local Wellness Policy (2005) recommends that schools provide students with adequate time to eat. "Adequate" is not defined.

School Breakfast: Code 380.1272a (1996) requires school breakfast in schools with 20 percent or more students are eligible for free or reduced lunch during the immediately preceeding school year. 

Food Allergies: No state policy.

Farm-to-School: The Farm to School Procurement Act  requires the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) and the Michigan Department of Agriculture (MDA) to collaborate to encourage school food authorities to purchase local farm products. The act requires MDE to: · investigate potential procedures and tools for school authorities to purchase local farm products and abide by Federal regulations, educate food service directors on the small purchase threshold and other procurement procedures and tools, and  implement food preparation training for food service staff to accommodate fresh and local foods. The MDA, as part of the collaboration, has to house a farm-to-school point person to coordinate its efforts with the MDE and the Department of Community Health, identify, target, and promote job creation around farm-to-school initiatives, investigate opportunities for farmers to supply their products to commercial distributors, and, in cooperation with commodity groups and growers associations, use existing web-based market development tools or adopt a voluntary web-based directory of farmers searchable by location. Public Acts 343 and 344, raise the small purchase threshold for school food purchases at public school districts and intermediate school districts. A higher small purchase threshold gives Michigan school food service directors more room to purchase local foods from Michigan farmers through informal purchasing procedures.

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Competitive Foods in School
     Last Updated: 6/2/2014

The State Board of Education and the Department of  Education recommend the following standards for foods and beverages Served Outside the USDA Child Nutrition Programs at Elementary, Middle and High Schools in their Recommendations for all Foods and Beverages Available in Michigan Schools (2010). Standards apply to a la carte and vending. In addition, if classroom parties include food and/or beverages, at least half of the items offered should meet the standards. Fundraising activities should meet the standards, and fundraisers selling foods and/or beverages cannot be held less than 30 minutes before the firstlunch period stards, or less than 30 minutes after the final lunch period ends.

Beverage Standards:

  • Water - without flavoring, additives, carbonation or added sugar
  • Juice - 100% juice or 100% juice/water blends, with no added sugar (up to 10 oz portion)
  • Milk - Low-fat (1%) or fat-free milk (flavored or unflavored) and lactose-free and soy beverages.
  • Sports drinks - Should not be available in the school setting. Coaches may determine whether sports drinks are made available to student athletes under allowable conditions to maintain hydration. Beverages such as water, low-fat or fat-free milk, and/or 100% juice should be considered
  • Other beverages - Not allowed at the elementary and middle school level. At the high school level, schools may choose to serve caffeinated, fortified, or flavored beverages with less than 5 calories per serving as packaged, up to 20 oz, or 100% juice or 100% juice/water blends wtih carbonation, up to 12 oz.


Competitive Food Standards
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Entrees:
Any entree that is on the daily menu as a part of a reimbursable meal may be served/sold outside of a reimbursable meal in single serving and on that same day only. Calores must be 500 or less, saturated fat less than 6 grams/serving and less than 600 mg/serving of sodium.

Other Foods:

  • Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and related combination products and low-fat and fat-free dairy as packaged.
  • 200 calories or less, 35% or less total calories from fat, 10% or less total calories from saturated fat, trans fat free (less than or equal to .5 gm per serving), sugar may not exceed 35% or less total weight, no more than 230 mg sodium as packaged.
  • Schools may choose to serve nuts, seeds and reduced-fat cheese in 1 oz portions (exempt from fat and saturated fat standards). Low-fat yougurt can contain no more than 30 grams of total sugars per 8 oz portion.

 

Fundraising Exemptions:

As of July 1, 2014, all fundraisers must meet USDA's Smart Snacks standards.

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Physical Activity Other Than Physical Education
     Last Updated: 5/27/2013

General Physical Activity Requirement: The State Board of Education Model Policy on Quality Physical Education and Physical Activity in Schools recommends that all public schools offer daily opportunities for physical activity, both structured and unstructured, apart from the physical education program, for all students K-12. Recommendations include offering at least 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity during the school day, outside of the physical education class. This includes at least 20 minutes of scheduled recess and/or daily periods of physical activity breaks incorporated throughout the day for all grades. In addition, physical activity, including recess, may not be denied or used for disciplinary reasons, or to make up lessons or class work. All teachers should be trained in how to integrate physical activity into their classrooms. Sedentary time should be limited to less than 2 hours at one time.
 

     Last Updated: 5/28/2013

Recess or Physical Activity Breaks: State Board of Education Model Policy on Quality Physical Education and Physical Activity in Schools recommends that all public schools offer daily opportunities for physical activity, both structured and unstructured, apart from the physical education program, for all students K-12. Recommendations include offering at least 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity during the school day, outside of the physical education class. This includes at least 20 minutes of scheduled recess and/or daily periods of physical activity breaks incorporated throughout the day for all grades.

The Michigan State Board of Education's Policies for Creating Effective Learning Environments (2000) recommends that public schools offer daily recess or physical activity periods for elementary and middle school students, and offer physical education programs at all grade levels with accommodations for students who need them. The Model Local Wellness Policy (2005) recommends districts adopt policies for implementing programs that are conducive to physical activity. Further, the Board assigns public schools the duty to help students and families make good, lifelong, and beneficial health choices. Recess is also recommended in the State Board's Policy on Quality Physical Education (2003).

     Last Updated: 5/28/2013

Recess Before Lunch: The Model Local Wellness Policy (2005) recommends that schools schedule recess before lunch.

The State Board of Education Model Policy on Quality Physical Education and Physical Activity in Schools strongly encourages recess before lunch.

Walking/Biking to School
: The State Board of Education Model Policy on Quality Physical Education and Physical Activity in Schools (2012) states that students and staff members will be encouraged and supported to safely walk or bike to school as often as possible.

Organized Sports
     Last Updated: 5/23/2013

Interscholastic Athletics: No state policy.

Concussion and Sports-Related Head InjuryPublic Act 342 (2012) requires the department of education to develop educational materials on the nature and risks of concussions, and a concussion awareness training program that addresses the following: the nature and risk of concussions, criteria for removal in case of suspected concussion, and the risks to an athlete of not reported a suspected concussion, and the risks of return to play.


Automated External Defibrillator (AED):  No state policy.

Safe and Drug-Free Schools
     Last Updated: 12/19/2012

The State Board of Education's Policies For Creating Effective Learning Environments (2000) states that public schools promote safe learning environments by periodically assessing their current learning environments, by continually maintaining a positive learning climate, and by promoting appropriate behaviors modeled by staff and practiced by students. This policy is reaffirmed later in the Policies on Bullying (2010). The Policies on Safe Schools (2000) similarly makes it the State Board's policy to undertake proactive, preventative approaches to ensure a safe school environment by involving parents and the broader community, by providing access to alternative programs for troubled youth and by providing appropriate post-traumatic support to victims of school violence. The State Board's Policy on Integrating Mental Health in Schools (2010) recommends that schools utilizie their district's school improvement team to help implement a socially and emotionally healthy school environment for all students and staff.

The Statewide Safe School Choice Policy (2003) suggests guidelines and offers technical assistance for the implementation of the State Safe School Choice Policy provision of the NCLB Act (2001). The State Board of Education recommends that any pupil enrolled in a school identified as a Persistently Dangerous School be allowed to attend a safe school within the same school district, and any pupil who becomes the victim of a violent criminal offense, including assault and the infliction of serious or aggravated injury, shall be allowed to attend another safe public school within the same school district. Definition of a Persistently Dangerous School is detailed in the policy.

Fighting/Gangs:  The Policies on Safe Schools makes it the State Board's policy to undertake proactive, preventative approaches to ensure a safe school environment, suggesting schools offer appropriate post-traumatic support to victims of school violence incidents. 

MCL 380.1310 (2000) requires a pupil enrolled in grade 6 or above who commits a physical assault at school against another pupil to be suspended or expelled from the school district for up to 180 school days. The district is not required to enroll a student expelled from another district during the expulsion period. 

Weapons: MCL 380.1313 (1995) requires the district superintendent to immediately report a pupil found to be in possession a dangerous weapon while in school or at a school activity or while the pupil is enroute to or from school on a school bus to their parent or legal guardian and the local law enforcement agency. The weapon may be confiscated and turned over to a law enforcement agency. MCL 380.1311 (1999) further requires the permanent expulsion of the offending pupil from the school district upon the school board's decision.  

MCL 380.1308 (1999) recommends the statewide school safety information policy to include procedures for reporting incidents involving the possession of a dangerous weapon. Michigan State Police Code 28.16 (1994) requires police departments to provide firearms safety programs for students to public school districts.

Drugs and Alcohol: No state policy.

Collaboration with Law Enforcement: MCL 380.1308 requires the identification of incidents occurring at school that must be reported to law enforcement agencies. Law enforcement shall at least investigate reported incidents, identify those involved in a reported incident, assist in prevention of these types of incidents, and, when appropriate, get assistance from a child protection agency. School boards are also required to cooperate with local law enforcement agencies to ensure that detailed and accurate building plans, blueprints, and site plans, as appropriate, for each school building operated by the school board are provided to the appropriate local law enforcement agency.

MCL 380.1313 requires confiscated weapons be turned over to a law enforcement agency for investigation. Furthermore, per MCL 380.1310a, law enforcement officials are to be consulted by the superintendent of public instruction for the content and manner of reporting crime in the school districts in an effort to build partnerships to help prevent crime and violence and to plan and implement school safety programs. 

Bullying, Harassment and Hazing
     Last Updated: 12/19/2012

Bullying/Harassment :  MCL 380.1310b  (2011) defines bullying as “any written, verbal, or physical act, or any electronic communication, that is intended or that a reasonable person would know is likely to harm 1 or more pupils either directly or indirectly by doing any of the following:  (1) Substantially interfering with educational opportunities, benefits, or programs of 1 or more pupils (2) Adversely affecting the ability of a pupil to participate in or benefit from the school district’s or public school’s educational programs or activities by placing the pupil in reasonable fear of physical harm or by causing substantial emotional distress.(3)  Having an actual and substantial detrimental effect on a pupil’s physical or mental health. (4) Causing substantial disruption in, or substantial interference with, the orderly operation of the school.”

MCL 380.1310b  (2011) requires a school district or board of directors of a public school academy to adopt and implement a policy prohibiting bullying at school. Districts are required to hold at least on public hearing on the proposed policy. The policy must include: (a) a statement prohibiting bullying of a pupil, (b) a statement prohibiting retaliation or false accusation against a target of bullying, a witness, or another person with reliable information about an act of bullying, (c) a provision indicating that all pupils are protected under the policy and that bullying is equally prohibited without regard to its subject matter or motivating animus, (d) the identification by job title of school officials responsible for ensuring that the policy is implemented,  (e) A statement describing how the policy is to be publicized, (f) a procedure for providing notification to the parent or legal guardian of a victim of bullying and the perpetrator, (g) A procedure for reporting an act of bullying and for prompt investigation of a report, identifying either the principal their designee as the person responsible for the investigation, (i) a procedure documenting any prohibited incident that is reported and a procedure to report all verified incidents of bullying and the resulting consequences to the board of the school district on an annual basis. Additional recommendations for the policy are outlined in the legislation.

The State Board of Education's Policies on Bullying (2010) recommends that schools should develop a plan designed to prevent bullying, and develop methods to react to bullying when it occurs, as an integral part of a district-wide safety and discipline plan. The state board also recommends that schools should institute an anti-bullying program incorporating the basic elements described in the policy, to promote a positive school atmostphere that fosters learning, and to create a fear-free school environment in the classroom, playground, and at school-sponsored activities.  

The State Board of Education has created a Model Anti-Bullying Policy for local boards of education to follow when developing their own anti-bullying plan. 

MCL 380.1300a (1993) requires the board of each school district to adopt and implement a written sexual harassment policy that, at a minimum, prohibits sexual harassment by school district employees, board members, and pupils directed toward other employees or pupils and shall specify penalties for violation of the policy.

CyberbullyingMCL 380.1310b(2011) includes electronic communication in its definition of bullying and requires a school district or board of directors of a public school academy to adopt and implement a policy prohibiting bullying at school

Hazing:  Michigan Penal Code 750.411t (2004) states that a person who attends, is employed by, or is a volunteer of an educational institution shall not engage in or participate in the hazing of an individual. Punishment based on the severity of the hazing incident is laid out, as well as what actions are defined as hazing.

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Crisis Management/Emergency Response
     Last Updated: 2/21/2010

Response and Management Plans: MCL 380.1308 (1999) requires the implementation of a statewide school safety information policy. It establishes procedures to be followed and when law enforcement is to be involved in the case of emergency or reported criminal incidence. School boards are also required to cooperate with local law enforcement agencies to ensure that detailed and accurate building plans, blueprints, and site plans, as appropriate, for each school building operated by the school board are provided to the appropriate local law enforcement agency.

The State Board's Policy on Integrating Mental Health in Schools (2010) recommends schools to annually review the Crisis Intervention policy annually and to strengthen the Crisis Intervention Team and its role in responding to mental health concerns in the school setting. It also recommends that each school ensure that the school/district is included in the community Emergency Preparedness Plan.

Reporting Incidents of Violence: MCL 380.1310a (2000) requires local school boards, at least on an annual basis, to report to the superintendent of public instruction expulsions and incidents of crime occurring at school within the school district. Further, each school building, on a weekly basis, is required to collect and keep current information needed for the report. Additionally, the Statewide Safe School Choice Policy (2003) requires each school board to report to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction a report on each Persistently Dangerous School in its jurisdiction.

MCL 380.1313 requires confiscated weapons be reported and turned over to a law enforcement agency for investigation. Similarly, MCL 380.1308 requires school officials to report to law enforcement agencies when a school safety incident has occurred at school.

 

Tobacco Use
     Last Updated: 5/12/2008

Michigan Penal Code 750.473 (1993) prohibits the use of tobacco products on school property except in outdoor areas, including open-air stadiums, during the weekend hours or other days on which there are no regularly scheduled school hours, and after 6 p.m. on regular school days.

The State Board of Education's Policy on 24/7 Tobacco-Free Schools (2005), which builds off of their Policy on the Management of Asthma in Schools (2005), recommends schools to develop and adopt tobacco-free policies and practices. This policy should apply 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, on all school property, in any school transportation vehicle, and at school-sponsored events on or off school property.

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Air Quality
     Last Updated: 10/12/2005

In 2003, the State Board of Education adopted the Policy on Coordinated School Health Programs to Support Academic Achievement and Healthy Schools that recommends each school district to promote a positive school climate and safe school facility by monitoring air quality in schools for molds, dust, and property humidity as part of a Coordinated School Health Program.

In 2005, the State Board of Education adopted the Policy on the Management of Asthma in Schools that recommends schools to implement best practice policies that prevent indoor and outdoor air quality problems which could include preventative maintenance on heating/cooling systems, construction and remodeling projects, bus idling, dust mites, and molds.

Act 306 of 1937 (2002) calls for the regulation of construction, reconstruction, and remodeling of school buildings in order to promote the safety, welfare, and educational interests of the people of the state.

Pesticide Use
     Last Updated: 11/13/2006

The Natural Resource and Environmental Act 451 of 1994, Administrative Code 324.8325, requires the director of the Department of Natural Resources to create rules pertaining to the development of training programs for integrated pest management systems in schools according to section of. Prior notification of pesticide application at schools to parents and guardians of children in the beginning of each school year stating the approximate location and date of application is also required according to section 324.8316 (1995) of the Code.

In 2005, the State Board of Education adopted the Policy on the Management of Asthma in Schools that recommends schools to implement best practice policies that prevent indoor and outdoor air quality problems, which could include integrated pest management techniques and pesticide application notification.

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Playground/Facility Safety
     Last Updated: 1/21/2006

MCL §408.686 (1998) makes school districts responsible for the maintenance, repair, and upkeep of the public playground equipment that it owns and operates. MCL §408.684 (2002) outlines the standards for public playground equipment and MCL §408.683 and §408.687 (1998) determine responsibility for state civil infractions of public playground equipment.

Shared Use Agreements
     Last Updated: 5/28/2013

The State Board  of Education Model Policy on Quality Physical Education and Physical Activity in Schools (2012) states that schools and districts are encouraged to establish joint use agreements with local government agencies to allow use of school facilities for physical activity and other community programs.

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Student Services
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Screening for Health Conditions
     Last Updated: 7/1/2010

Vision and Hearing: MCL 380.1177 (2000) requires children enrolling in kindergarten must provide evidence that their vision has been tested once since the age of 3.

Chronic Health Conditions: No state policy.

Body Mass Index (BMI) Screening: BMI Screening is recommended in the Healthy Weight (2001) paper approved by the State Board of Education.

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Administration of Medications
     Last Updated: 12/20/2012

Staff Administration: State Board of Education Administrative Code 340.1163 (1979) defines the functions of a school nurse as one who assesses the health status of students and provides medical assistance to enable optimum health for students in the education process.

MCL 380.1178a (2002) requires the department to make available to all school districts, intermediate school districts, and public school academies a model local policy concerning the administration of medications to pupils at school. The policy shall address the type and amount of training that may be required for persons administering medications to pupils in schools. School boards, intermediate school boards, and public school academy boards of directors are encouraged to align their local policies with the model policy.

MCL 380.1178 (2000) protects school employees administering medication in the presence of another adult or in a life-threatening emergency in accordance with written parental permission and physician's instructions are not liable in a criminal action or for civil damages as a result of the administration. The Code further exempts licensed registered school nurses from liability regardless of whether medication was administered in the presence of another adult.

In 2003, The State Board of Education adopted the Policy on Coordinated School Health Programs to Support Academic Achievement and Healthy Schools that also recommends that each school district develop, adopt, and implement a school health services program that includes medication administration, case management for students with chronic health conditions, and a host of preventative services as part of a Comprehensive School Health Program.

Self-Administration of Asthma Medication: MCL 380.1179 (2004) allows a pupil to use and possess a metered dose inhaler or a dry powder inhaler to alleviate asthmatic symptoms at school, on school-sponsored transportation, or at any activity, event, or program sponsored by the pupil's school. The code requires written approval from the pupil's physician and the parent or legal guardian if the child is a minor. The school district shall not be liable for damages arising from a pupil being permitted or not permitted to use an inhaler. Lastly, the code allows school districts to request an extra inhaler from the pupil's parent or guardian to use at school in cases of emergency.

In 2005, the State Board of Education adopted the Policy on the Management of Asthma in Schools that recommends schools provide appropriate school health services for students with asthma by developing and implementing policies that ensure students have immediate access to asthma medications by allowing students to self-carry and self-administer asthma medications, inhalers, and Epi-Pens.

Self-Management of Anaphylaxis MedicationMCL 380.1179 (2004) allows a pupil to use and possess an epinephrine auto-injector or epinephrine inhaler on school-sponsored transportation, or at any activity, event, or program sponsored by the pupil's school. The code requires written approval from the pupil's physician and the parent or legal guardian if the child is a minor. The school district shall not be liable for damages arising from a pupil being permitted or not permitted to use an auto-injector. Lastly, the code allows school districts to request an extra auto-injector from the pupil's parent or guardian to use at school in cases of emergency.

Psychotropic Medications: No state policy.

Storage and Record-keepingModel Policy and Guidelines for Administering Medications to Pupils at School (2002) addresses “Policies for Storage and Access to Medications in School” and “Policies for Record-Keeping Related to Medications in Schools." The development and review of the model policy was required by law (Section 1178a of the School Code). MCL 380.1179 allows a school district to request an extra inhaler or Epi-Pen from a student's parent or guardian to be given to designated personnel for emergency use, however, parents or guardians are not required to provide one.

Medical Emergencies: In 2003, The State Board of Education adopted the Policy on Coordinated School Health Programs to Support Academic Achievement and Healthy Schools that recommends each school district develop, adopt, and implement a school health services program that includes emergency/urgent care.

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Counseling and Mental Health Services
     Last Updated: 12/20/2012

Requirement to Provide Services: Michigan has no specific state policy requiring schools to provide counseling and mental health services. The Michigan Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling Program recommends curriculum for academic, personal-social, and career development. The State Board of Education's Policies on Safe Schools (2000) recommends public schools offer appropriate post-traumatic support to victims of school violence. The Policy on the Management of Asthma in Schools (2005) also recommends schools provide appropriate mental health services for students with asthma. 

The State Board's Policy on Integrating Mental Health in Schools (2010) recommends that schools create or designate a team to provide mental health assistance, including follow-up, to individual students as indicated. Each team should, at a minimum, include a mental health provider such as a school social worker, psychologist, counselor, or community mental health provider; a school liaison, and other community representative where available and appropriate. It also recommends developing an MOU with local mental health providers outlining roles, relationships and responsibilities, with the purpose of improving access to services for students and their families. The policy recommends establishing an arrangement for an on-site mental health provider to deliver mental health treatment services to students on an on-going, as-needed basis.

Substance Abuse: No state policy.

Suicide Prevention: The Revisde School Code, Act 451 of 1976,  (Sec 380.1171) requires the school district or board of directors to provide age appropriate instruction for pupils and school personnel concerning the warning signs and risk factors for suicide and depression and protective factors that help prevent suicide. The board    Section Sec 380.1171. Suicide prevention and awareness; instruction and professional development. The board of a school district or board of directors of a public school academy is encouraged to work with school personnel and local or state organizations and resources specializing in suicide prevention and awareness. The code requires the Department of Education to develop or identify model programs and materials, and requires the school board to notify parents of students receiving suicide prevention instruction.

HIV, STD, and Pregnancy Testing and Counseling: Michigan does not require schools or districts to provide voluntary HIV, STD, or pregnancy testing or counseling services.

Public Act 336 of 1993 prohibits a school official from making referrals for abortions. Michigan School Code 380.1507 prohibits anyone from dispensing or distributing a family planning drug or device on public school property and prohibits the teaching of abortion as a method of reproductive health. Violation of this prohibition by any school results in the forfeiture of 5% of its state aid appropriation per the State School Aid Act 388.1766 (1996).

Immunity of Liability: The Governmental Liability for Negligence Act 691.1401-692.1419 (1964) generally gives immunity or defines the limits of immunity to all government employees and agents of liability when acting on behalf of the state of Michigan.

Identification of Students with Mental or Emotional Disorders: The State Board's Policy on Integrating Mental Health in Schools (2010) recommends that schools institute an approved mental health policy and protocol that specifically delineates how students will be identified, assessed, and when applicable, will receive appropriate intervention including a possible referral for mental health services.

The Michigan Mental Health Code provides in section 330.1707 that mental health professionals may treat minor children who are at least age 14 without the consent or knowledge of the minor's parent or guardian. In fact, the health professional cannot without the consent of the minor inform the parent or guardian of the mental health services. The treatment has to be on an outpatient basis and cannot extend for more than twelve sessions or fourth months of services after which time the treatment can continue but only with parental consent.

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Immunization
     Last Updated: 12/20/2012

Required Immunizations for School Settings (2012) outlines the immunization requirements for pupils in Michigan Schools.

Exemptions: MCL 333.9215 (1978) allows for exemption from immunization requirements under the following circumstances:  (1) Certification from a physician that a specific immunization for any period of time is or may be detrimental to a child's health or is not appropriate, or (2) A written statement from a parent, guardian or person in loco parentis to the administrator of the child's school or operator of the group program that they hold religious convictions or other objections to immunization.

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Accommodation
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Staff with HIV
     Last Updated: 1/21/2006

No state policy.

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Students with HIV
     Last Updated: 1/21/2006

No state policy.

Pregnant or Parenting Students
     Last Updated: 12/19/2012

Administrative Code 340 Sections 1121-1124 (1979) states that a pregnant student may withdraw from school upon written request from her parent or legal guardian. The request must also include a certificate by a physician that continued attendance might adversely affect her health or that of her child. The student is required to comply with the compulsory school attendance law following the birth of the baby, unless otherwise certified by a physician. The state does not require districts to offer alternative programs for pregnant or parenting students. However, the state does not permit it, and should a pregnant student apply to such a program they must be accepted.

MCL 388.1709 (2011) provides legal requirements for homebound and hospitalized students. Educational agencies must treat pregnancy, childbirth, false pregnancy, termination of pregnancy, and recovery there from in the same manner and under the same policies as any other eligible medical condition. The law requires a district or agency to provide homebound/hospitalized instruction services to enrolled students who are certified by the student’s attending physician, hospital or licensed treatment facility as having a medical condition that requires the student to be hospitalized or to be confined to the home during regular school hours for a period longer than five (5) or more school days. The State Department of Education provides guidance on this requirement. [note this is a change in policy and NWLC has talked about this change in depth on their website: [http://www.nwlc.org/our-blog/justice-pregnant-and-parenting-students-michigan]

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Individual Health Plan for Students
     Last Updated: 10/12/2005

Administrative Code 340.1709a (2002) defines “other health impairments” under the Individual with Disabilities Education Act to include a child with a chronic or acute health problem and should be evaluated by a multidisciplinary evaluation team. Administrative Code 340.1713 (2002) informs the individualized education program team that an environmental, cultural, or economic disadvantage is not considered a specific learning disability.

In 2005, the State Board of Education adopted the Policy on the Management of Asthma in Schools that recommends schools establish asthma management and support systems by including individual asthma action plan forms in annual enrollment materials.

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Coordination/ Implementation
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Coordinating or Advisory Councils
     Last Updated: 8/17/2008

State Level: Administrative Code 388.274 (1970) and MCL 388.384 (1970) instruct the department of education to periodically convene, as necessary, groups of individuals from universities and colleges, various fields of education, voluntary health agencies, professional health associations, the state departments of public health and mental health and from the local school districts to advise it on the implementation of the Critical Health Problems Education Act and rules.

Local Level: Public Act 165 (2004) stipulates that school districts that provide sex education classes shall not offer instruction without the establishment of a sex education advisory board by the local board. The advisory board shall be made up of two appointed co-chairs, one of whom is a parent, and at least half of the members shall be parents who have a child attending a school operated by the school district. The policy further requires pupils, educators, local clergy, and community health professionals to be included on the advisory board.

In 2003 the State Board of Education adopted the nonbinding Policy on Coordinated School Health Programs to Support Academic Achievement and Healthy Schools, which recommends each school district to establish a School Health Council and each school building establish a School Health Team. Both the Council and Team should consist of school staff, families, students, and members of the community to oversee, evaluate, and make recommendations to the board regarding the Coordinated School Health Program. The Board also adopted the Policy to Promote Health and Prevent Disease and Pregnancy in 2003 that recommends local advisory boards meet semi-annually to review the progress of sexuality education programs and make necessary recommendations to the local school board.

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School Health Program Coordinators
     Last Updated: 7/19/2010

State Level: No policy.

Local Level: Michigan does not require schools or districts to designate a school health program coordinator. However, Michigan School Code 380.1506 does require a certified physician or nurse to supervise the program of instruction in reproductive health.

In 2003, the State Board of Education adopted the nonbinding Policy on Coordinated School Health Programs to Support Academic Achievement and Healthy Schools that recommends each school building and district to designate a School Health Program Coordinator to plan, implement, coordinate, and evaluate the Coordinate School Health Program components.

Confidentiality
     Last Updated: 9/4/2009

Student Health-Related Records: State Board of Education Administrative Code 340.1163 (1979) requires schools nurses to maintain the confidentiality of information regarding a student's medical evaluations.

Student Health-Related Services: Michigan Public Health Code 333.18117 (1999) makes the confidential relations and communications between a licensed professional counselor and client privileged and not to be disclosed, except as otherwise provided by law or upon consent of the client.

Limitations on Student Surveys
     Last Updated: 1/21/2006
No state policy.
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