Last Reviewed by State Dept of Education: 10/1/2010
Contact us with corrections or additions Kansas Last Updated: 6/9/2014
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Curriculum and Instruction
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Health Education
     Last Updated: 7/22/2013

Mandate: Statute 72-1101 (1979) mandates that every accredited elementary school teach health and hygiene." The minimally stated law does not provide any further detail. For graduation from high school, Regulation 91-31-35 (2005) requires one unit of physical education, which shall include health and may include safety, first aid, or physiology."

Regulation 91-31-32 (2005) requires that as a prerequisite for accreditation, each school should provide physical education, which shall include instruction in health and human sexuality." 

Curriculum Content:  The state does not have a required or suggested curriculum.  However, the Department of Education encourages the use of the Kansas Model Curricular Standards for Health Education (2007) to plan and implement health education in the schools.

State Assessment Requirement: No state policy.

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Physical Education
     Last Updated: 7/22/2013

Mandate: State Board Regulation 91-31-32 (2005) requires that as a prerequisite for accreditation, each school should provide physical education, which shall include instruction in health and human sexuality."  For graduation from high school,  State Board Regulation 91-31-35 (2005) requires one unit of physical education, which shall include health and may include safety, first aid, or physiology."

The Kansas School Wellness Policy Model Guidelines (2005) provides time recommendations for physical education and percentage of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity for students.  House Resolution 6011 (2006) states the legislature's support for physical education and urges the State Board of Education to require some type of physical education class for all grades K-12.

Exemptions: Regulation 91-31-35 (2005) allows the physical education (including health) high school graduation requirement to be waived for medical or religious reasons. Regulation 91-31-34 (2005) states, a school shall neither offer credit for athletic practice nor count athletic practice as a physical education course."

Curriculum Content The state does not have a required or suggested curriculum.  However, the Department of Education encourages the use of the Kansas Model Curricular Standards for Physical Education (no date available) to plan and implement health education in the schools.

Physical Fitness Assessment: No state policy.

Asthma Awareness Education
     Last Updated: 1/16/2006
Not specifically required.
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Emotional, Social, and Mental Health Education
     Last Updated: 9/14/2010

Kansas does not specifically require emotional, social and mental health education to be taught in schools.  Mental and emotional health" is one of the content areas for the health education standards outlined by the Kansas Model Curricular Standards for Health Education (2007). 

Character Education: No state policy.

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HIV, STD, and Pregnancy Prevention Education
     Last Updated: 11/2/2011

Mandate: Kansas does not specifically require HIV, STD, or pregnancy prevention education to be taught in schools.  91-31-32 (2005) requires that as a prerequisite for accreditation, each school should provide physical education, which shall include instruction in health and human sexuality."  Each of the local school districts determine to which extent they cover the topics of HIV/AIDS/STDs and human sexuality education.

The Kansas Model Curricular Standards for Health Education (2007) states Each board education shall provide a complete program of abstinence until marriage in human sexuality that is developmentally appropriate, including information about sexually transmitted diseases, especially HIV/AIDS."

Curriculum Content: The state does not require schools to follow nor endorse a specific curriculum.  The Kansas Model Curricular Standards for Health Education (2007) provides benchmarks, indicators and instructional examples for school districts to follow when implementing curriculum.

Parental Approval: Per the Kansas Model Curricular Standards for Health Education (2007), the Health Education Standards Committee believes that parents should be involved with the health education of their children. Parents are encouraged to visit with their school’s health teachers about the health topics that will be covered in class, and to talk with their children about these health issues.

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Nutrition Education
     Last Updated: 11/2/2011

Kansas does not specifically require nutrition education to be taught in schools.  Nutrition is one of the content areas for the health education standards outlined by the Kansas Model Curricular Standards for Health Education (2007).

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Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drug Use Education
     Last Updated: 11/2/2011

Kansas does not specifically require alcohol, tobacco and drug use education to be taught in schools.   Substance use, misuse, abuse and addiction" is one of the content areas for the health education standards outlined by the Kansas Model Curricular Standards for Health Education (2007).

Alcohol: No state policy.

Tobacco: No state policy.

Drugs: No state policy.

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Injury and Violence Prevention Education
     Last Updated: 6/5/2008

Bullying/Harassment: No state policy.

Fighting/Gangs: No state policy.

Suicide and Other Self-Abuse Prevention: No state policy.

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Staff
Requirements for All Educators Regarding Health Education
     Last Updated: 1/16/2006
None specified.
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Requirements for Health Educators
     Last Updated: 11/2/2011

Pre-service Requirement: The minimum requirement for prospective health teachers in elementary, middle, and high school grades prior to licensure is a bachelor's degree, with no additional coursework in health. The specific details of initial licensure are outlined in Regulations 91-1-202 (2002) and 91-1-209 (2003).

Professional Development: License renewal required every 5 years.

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Requirements for Physical Educators
     Last Updated: 11/17/2011

Pre-service Requirement: The minimum requirement for prospective physical education teachers in elementary, middle, and high school grades prior to licensure is a bachelor's degree, with no additional coursework in physical education. The specific details of initial licensure are outlined in Regulations 91-1-202 (2002) and 91-1-209 (2003). 

Professional Development: License renewal required every 5 years.

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Requirements for School Nurses
     Last Updated: 11/17/2011

Pre-service Requirement: Licensure as a nurse is required for service as a public school nurse. Statute 65-1115 (2001) requires applicants to have graduated from an accredited high school and an approved school of professional nursing for licensure as a registered professional nurse.

Statute 60-15-101 (2009) outlines the definitions and functions of a registered nurse in a school setting.

Professional Development: As applicable to all nurses.

Student-to-Nurse Ratio: No state policy.

Requirements for Non-Certified Personnel to Administer Medication
     Last Updated: 11/17/2011

Pre-service Requirement: Statute 65-1124 (2000) states that the performance of nursing procedures in a school setting when delegated by a licensed professional nurse, in accordance with the rules and regulations of the board, is not prohibited. 

Regulations 60-15-101 to 60-15-103 (1998) of the Nurse Practice Act allows a registered nurse to delegate selected nursing tasks or procedures to unlicensed personnel so long as they are supervised. The nurse is required to orient and instruct the unlicensed person in the performance of the nursing task and procedure, and must also put in writing the procedure and the identity of the delegate. Regulation 60-15-104 (1998) also allows unlicensed personnel to administer certain medications under supervision of a registered professional nurse. Further specifics can be found within these regulations. 

Professional Development: Professional development is required with delegation of a nursing task.

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Requirements for School Counselors
     Last Updated: 11/17/2011

Pre-service Requirement: Education regulation 91-1-201 (2004) requires a school specialist license be obtained. Regulation 91-1-203 (2004) requires a minimum of a graduate degree, at least one year of recent accredited experience or eight recent credit hours, a minimum of a 3.25 cumulative graduate GPA, a currently valid professional teaching license, and the successful completion of a school specialist assessment.

Statute 72-7513 (2001) requires the state board to adopt and maintain standards, criteria, guidelines or rules and regulations for certification of counselors.

Professional Development: License renewal required every five years.

Student-to-Counselor Ratio: No state policy.

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Requirements for School Psychologists
     Last Updated: 11/17/2011

Pre-service Requirement: Regulation 91-1-201 (2004) requires a school specialist license be obtained. Regulation 91-1-203 (2004) requires a minimum of a graduate degree, at least one year of recent accredited experience or eight recent credit hours, a minimum of a 3.25 cumulative graduate GPA, and the successful completion of a school specialist assessment. Regulation 91-1-202 (2003) makes available at the high school level a school psychologist endorsement. 

Professional Development: License renewal required every five years.

Student-to-Psychologist Ratio: No state policy.

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Requirements for School Social Workers
     Last Updated: 7/9/2008

Pre-service Requirement: As required by the State Behavioral Science Regulatory Board.

Professional Development: As required by the State Behavioral Science Regulatory Board.

Student-to-Social Worker Ratio: No state policy.

Requirements for Food Service Personnel
     Last Updated: 7/14/2008

Pre-service Requirement: None specified.

Professional Development: None specified.

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Requirements for Athletic Coaches
     Last Updated: 7/19/2008

Pre-service Requirement: None specified.

Professional Development: None specified.

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Health Promoting Environment
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Wellness Policies
     Last Updated: 9/14/2010

Additional Accountability Requirements: The state requires LEAs to annually complete the online Wellness Policy Builder assessment tool to document their consideration of the state's School Wellness Policy Guidelines (2010) as required by Senate Bill 154.

The Department of Education's Child Nutrition and Wellness staff, through their annual formal review, has officially incorporated monitoring of wellness policy implementation into their protocols. The required written implementation plan of each LEA is also evaluated.

Additional Content Requirements: None

Guidance Materials: The State Board of Education has adopted School Wellness Model Policy Guidelines (2010) per Senate Bill 154. The same law further requires local boards of education to take into consideration these Guidelines when creating their local wellness policy.

The Department of Education's Child Nutrition and Wellness division provides several resources, including: a Development Process for KSDE's Model School Wellness Policy Guidelines that specifies a timeline for creating and implementing wellness policies; an online Wellness Policy Builder that provides step-by-step guidance for creating and implementing a policy; templates for implementation plans for nutrition education, nutrition, and physical activity; and spreadsheets for calculating and evaluating calorie, fat, and sugar content of products in comparison to the Kansas School Wellness Policy Model Guidelines.

Other: None

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School Meals Program
     Last Updated: 7/29/2013

Food Services: Statute 72-5115 (1973) allows the state board of education to enter into agreements with the US Department of Agriculture and other federal agencies for participation in a food service program. At a local level, Statute 75-5126 (2003) allows local boards of education to enter into contracts with the governing body of nonpublic schools, municipalities, or nonprofit organization for the provision of food. All money received by a school district under a contract must be deposited into the food service fund.

Statute 72-5122 (1973) allows the state board to conduct studies to improve and expand food service programs in schools in order to promote nutritional education. Further, the state board may conduct appraisals of the nutritive benefits of food service programs.

Adequate Time to Eat: The School Wellness Policy Model Guidelines (2010) recommends that students have at least 10 minutes to eat breakfast and 15 minutes to eat lunch.

School Breakfast: Statute 72-5125 (1992) requires all public schools to offer breakfast unless they have been granted an annual waiver by the Kansas State Board of Education. No waiver shall be granted for a school building in which 35 percent or more of the students are free and reduced price lunch eligible. 

Food Allergies:  No state policy.

Farm-to-School: No state policy.

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Competitive Foods in School
     Last Updated: 6/9/2014

The Kansas State Board of Education  requires  all accredited K-12 schools in Kansas to implement the Exemplary level of the School Wellness Model Policy Guidelines (2010) for foods and beverages sold in vending machines. According to these guidelines, foods of minimal nutritional value (FMNV) cannot be sold on school property in areas accessible to students in elementary and middle schools until after the end of the school day and in secondary schools until one hour after the last lunch period. The Exemplary guidelines for vended foods and beverages are as follows:

 Exemplary Level Food Standards:
A la carte: (items sold by food service program other than SBP and NSLP meals)     
§ Allowed Portion Sizes:
·         Limited to the same portion size of any food item served that day in the NSLP or SBP
§ Allowed Foods:
·         Fruits and/or vegetables
·         Low-fat and/or nonfat yogurt
·         Other items- All items offered must meet all of the following guidelines per serving:

o    Fat: 35% total calories max or less than 4g per 100 cal (except for nuts, seeds, nut butters)
o    Sugar: 35% total weight max or less than 9g per 100 cal (except for fruit without added sugar)
o    Calories: 200 calories max per selling unit
o    Vending Machines and School Stores:

§ FMNVs cannot be sold on school property in areas accessible to students
·         In elementary and middle schools
·         In secondary schools until after the end of the school day
§ Allowed Foods:
·         All items offered must meet the following guidelines per selling unit:

o    Fat: 35% total calories max or less than 4g per 100 cal (except for nuts, seeds, nut butters)
o    Sugar: 35% total weight max or less than 9g per 100 cal (except for fruit without added sugar)
o    Calories: 200 calories max per selling unit
o    During the School Day: (all classroom activities, fundraisers, intramural events)

§ Students are encouraged to have individual water bottles in the classroom
§ Food and beverages for classroom parties, celebrations, and rewards will meet the same guidelines as Exemplary level for a la carte foods and will not be provided until at least one hour after the end of the last lunch period.
§ At least 75% of fundraising activities will not involve the sale of food or beverages.
§ Refreshments provided for students participating in school events adhere to the Exemplary guidelines for vended foods and beverages.
§ Parents, teachers, and organizations are informed about the guidelines and encouraged to follow them.

o    After School:
§ “Snack” means two or more items that are served as a unit. On all days of the week, snacks meet the following standards:
·         Fat: 35% total calories max or less than 4g per 100 cal (except for nuts, seeds, nut butters)
·         Sugar: 35% total weight max or less than 9g per 100 cal (except for fruit without added sugar)

 

Fundraising Exemption:

A May 14, 2014 memo from Cheryl Johnson, Director, Child Nutrition & Wellness to authorized representatives of School Nutrition Programs creates a policy, in effect July 1, 2014, that allows one exempt fundraiser per school organization per semester that does not meet the Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in School during the school day (midnight before to 30 minutes after the end of the school day) on school grounds will be allowed. An organization is defined as a school group that is approved by the local board of education. Length of the organization’s exempt fundraiser cannot exceed 2 days.

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Physical Activity Other Than Physical Education
     Last Updated: 8/28/2013

General Physical Activity Requirement: No state policy.

Recess or Physical Activity Breaks: The Wellness Policy Guidelines (2010) approved by the State Board of Education recommends elementary schools provide at least 20 minutes of supervised recess daily, preferably outdoors. The “Advanced” level includes periodic breaks during which students are encouraged to stand and be moderately active. The “Exemplary” level includes opportunities for physical activity regularly incorporated into other subject areas, and classroom teachers provide short physical activity breaks between lessons or classes, as appropriate.


Recess Before Lunch: The Wellness Policy Guidelines (2010) "exemplary" level includes schools offering recess before lunch.

Walking/Biking to School: No state policy.

Organized Sports
     Last Updated: 7/22/2013

Interscholastic Athletics: No state policy.

Concussion and Sports-Related Head Injury: Code 72-135 (2011) prohibits school athletes from participating in any sport competition or practice session unless such athlete and their  parent or guardian have signed, and returned to the school, a concussion and head injury information release form for each year they participate in school-related sport competition. If a school athlete suffers, or is suspected of having suffered, a concussion or head injury during a sport competition or practice session, such school athlete immediately shall be removed from the sport competition or practice session. Any school athlete who has been removed from a sport competition or practice session shall not return to competition or practice until the athlete is evaluated by a health care provider and the health care provider provides such athlete a written clearance to return to play or practice.

Automated External Defibrillator (AED): No state policy.

Safe and Drug-Free Schools
     Last Updated: 11/20/2011

Fighting/Gangs: No state policy.

Weapons: Statute 72-8901 (1994) grants the board of education of any district, or their authorized agent, the power to suspend or expel any student whose conduct endangers the safety of others. A case annotation of this statute specifically addresses gun possession, stating expulsion of a student for gun possession does not preclude juvenile prosecution.

Statute 72-89a02 (1997) requires each board of education to adopt a written policy requiring a one year or more expulsion from school for any pupil determined to be in possession of a weapon, as defined in Statute 72-89a01 (2001), on school property, at school, or at a school supervised activity.

Statute 21-4204 (1996) states possession of any firearm by any person, other than a law enforcement officer, in or on any school property or grounds upon which is located a building or structure used by a unified school district or an accredited nonpublic school for student instruction or attendance or extracurricular activities of pupils enrolled in kindergarten or any of the grades 1 through 12 or at any regularly scheduled school sponsored activity or event constitutes criminal possession of a firearm.

Drugs and Alcohol: Statute 21-36a-05 prohibits the sale, offer for sale, or possession with intent to sell, deliver, or distribute any opiates, opium, narcotic drugs, or any stimulant within 1,000 feet of school property or school extracurricular event. Violation of this statute is a felony.

Collaboration with Law Enforcement: Statute 72-8222 (1987) grants district boards of education the power to employ school security officers, one or more of which may be designated as a school law enforcement officer, to aid and supplement law enforcement agencies of the state.

Statute 72-89b03 (1999) states that each board of education is required to adopt a policy that requires and establishes procedures for the immediate report to appropriate law enforcement agencies by or on behalf of any school employee who knows or suspects that a misdemeanor, felony, or possession, use, or disposal of explosives, firearms, or other weapons has been committed at school, on school property, or at a school supervised activity.

Bullying, Harassment and Hazing
     Last Updated: 11/20/2011

Bullying/Harassment: KSA Supp 72-8256 (2008) defines bullying and requires each board of education of each school district to adopt and implement a plan to eliminate bullying.  Districts are required to have a written policy prohibiting bullying on school property or at school sponsored events.  The policy must include the following:  (1) A statement prohibiting bullying on school property or at school events, (2) A definition of bullying not less than that outlined in KSA Supp 72-8256 (2008), (3) Procedures for reporting bullying incidents, (4) A requirement for school personnel to report bullying incidents, (5) A requirement of notification to parents or guardians of students involved in an incident, (6) Procedures for documentation of reported incidents and responding to and investigating reported incidents, (7) A strategy for protecting victims from additional bullying and/or retaliation, (8) Disciplinary procedures for any student guilty of bullying, and (9) A requirement for confidentiality for any reported act of bullying.

KSA Supp 72-8256 (2008) defines cyberbullying and requires cyberbullying to be addressed in district policies related to bullying. It requires that district policies must prohibit bullying while using school property (even if a student is off school grounds).

KSA Supp 72-8256 (2008) requires local boards of education to annually survey students regarding acts of bullying in the school environment.  The information collected must be reported to the state department of education.

The State Board of Education adopted a Board Action on Bullying (2011) supporting the state statute requiring local boards to adopt anti-bullying policies. It also adopted a resolution establishing an Anti-Bullying Awareness week.

CyberbullyingKSA Supp 72-8256 (2008) defines cyberbullying and requires cyberbullying to be addressed in district policies related to bullying. It requires that district policies must prohibit bullying while using school property (even if a student is off school grounds).

Hazing: Although there is not state policy addressing hazing in schools, Statute 21-3434 (1993) classifies the promoting or permitting of hazing as a Class B non-person misdemeanor.

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Crisis Management/Emergency Response
     Last Updated: 11/20/2011

Response and Management Plans: No state policy.

Reporting Incidents of Violence: Statute 72-89b03 (1999) requires school employees to report information and the identity of any pupil whose conduct, amongst others, endangers the safety of others to the superintendent of schools. Further, each board of education is required to annually compile and report to the state board information relating to school safety and security.

Tobacco Use
     Last Updated: 11/20/2011

Statute 72-53,107 (1988) prohibits the use of tobacco products in school buildings.

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Air Quality
     Last Updated: 1/16/2006
No state policy.
Pesticide Use
     Last Updated: 1/16/2006
No state policy.
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Playground/Facility Safety
     Last Updated: 11/20/2011

Statute 72-1625 (1951) authorizes city boards of education to purchase or lease grounds to establish and maintain playgrounds in and on the grounds of public school buildings.

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Student Services
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Screening for Health Conditions
     Last Updated: 11/20/2011

Vision and Hearing: Statute 72-5205 (1959) requires each school board to provide basic vision screening without charge to every pupil not less than once every two years. Statute 72-1205 (1969) requires school districts and accredited nonpublic schools to provide students with basic hearing screening without charge during the first year of admission and not less than once every three years thereafter.

Chronic Health Conditions: Kansas does not specifically require schools or districts to identify students with asthma, however, Statute 72-5214 (1999) requires students up to age nine to receive a health assessment prior to admission into school.

Body Mass Index (BMI) Screening: No state policy.

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Administration of Medications
     Last Updated: 10/13/2013

Staff Administration: KAR 60-15-101   (2009) states that only a licensed registered professional nurse (or a physican provider) has the authority to delegate the administration of medication or other nursing procedures in schools to unlicensed assistive presonnel (UAP) and only with appropriate and adequate training, supervision and performance evaluation of the UAP. KAR 60-15-102 (2009)  requires that nursing procedures (including medication administration) in the schools can only be deelegated by a licensed registered professional nuse. This includes a nursing asessment of the student and the development of a plan of care for the student that may include delegation to a UAP. The KSBN provides additional guidance for delegation procedures in their tool Delegation of Specific Nursing Tasks in the School Setting for Kansas. KAR 60-15-103 requires a registered professional nurse or licensed practical nurse to supervise all nursing tasks or procedures delegated to an unlicensed person in the school setting. KAR 60-15-104 states that If the requirements of KAR 60-15-101 through 60-15-103 have been met, the unlicensed registered professional nurse may delegate medication administration to a UAP if: (1) No dosage calculation is required and, (2) The medication is administered by accepted methods specified in the nursing plan of care. A registered professional nurse may not delegate the procedure of medication administration in a school setting to unlicensed persons when administered by any of these means: (1) By intravenous (IV) route, (2) By intramuscular (IM) route, except when administered in an anticipated health crisis, (3) Through intermittent positive-pressure breathing machines; or (4) Through an established feeding tube that is not inserted directly into the abdomen. Guidelines for Medication Administration in Kansas Schools (2010) provides guidance on implementation of all of these statutes.

KSA 72-8258 (2009) allows any person to administer epinephrine to a student or staff member in an emergency situation if the person is exhibiting the signs and symptoms of of an anaphylactic reaction and  if a physician has instructed the school in writing to maintain a stock supply of epinephrine. The epinephrine may be administed at school, on school property , or at a school-sponsored event. In addition, the statute provides immunity from liability for civil damages for any person who "gratuitously and in good faith renders emergency care or treatment through the administration of epinephrine to a student or a member of a school staff at school."

KSA 72-8258 (2009) state that epinephrine from an epinephrine kit shall be used only in emergency situations when the person administering the epinephrine reasonably believes that the signs and symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction are occurring and if administered at school, on school property or at a school-sponsored event. 


Self-Administration of Asthma Medication: Statute 72-8252 (2012) requires each school district to adopt a policy authorizing the self-administration of medicine by students in grades K-12. "Medicine" is defined as medicine prescribed by a health care provider for the treatment of anaphylaxis or asthma including, but not limited to, any medicine defined in section 201 of the federal food, drug and cosmetic act, inhaled bronchodilators and auto-injectible epinephrine."

To self-administer medication, a student must satisfy the requirements of providing a written statement from the student's health care provider with a description of the name and purpose of the medication, the prescribed dosage, the time and any additional circumstances the medication is to be administered, and the length of time for the prescription; and providing written authorization from the student's health care provider and parent/guardian ensuring that the student has been instructed on self-administration of the medication and is authorized to do so in school. The Statute protects the school district and its employees from any liability from injury resulting from the self-administration of medication.

Self-Administration of Anaphylaxis Medication: Statute 72-8252 (2012) requires each school district to adopt a policy authorizing the self-administration of medicine by students in grades K-12. "Medicine" is defined as medicine prescribed by a health care provider for the treatment of anaphylaxis or asthma including, but not limited to, any medicine defined in section 201 of the federal food, drug and cosmetic act, inhaled bronchodilators and auto-injectible epinephrine."

To self-administer medication, a student must satisfy the requirements of providing a written statement from the student's health care provider with a description of the name and purpose of the medication, the prescribed dosage, the time and any additional circumstances the medication is to be administered, and the length of time for the prescription; and providing written authorization from the student's health care provider and parent/guardian ensuring that the student has been instructed on self-administration of the medication and is authorized to do so in school. The school district must also require that any back-up medication provided by the student's parent or guardian be kept at the student's school in a location to which the student has immediate access in the event of an asthma or anaphylaxis emergency. The school district must also require that any back-up medication provided by the student's parent or guardian be kept at the student's school in a location to which the student has immediate access in the event of an asthma or anaphylaxis emergency. The Statute protects the school district and its employees from any liability from injury resulting from the self-administration of medication.

Psychotropic Medications: No specific state policy.

Storage and Record-keeping: KSA 72-8258 (2012) allows any accredited school to maintain an epinephrine kit. The school must consult with a licensed pharmacist who shall be responsible for developing procedures, proper control and accountability for the epinephrine kit. Periodic physical inventory of the epinephrine kit shall be required.

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Counseling and Mental Health Services
     Last Updated: 11/20/2011

Requirement to Provide Services: No state policy.

Identification of Students with Mental or Emotional Disorders: No state policy.

Substance Abuse: Statute 72-53,105 (1985) allows school boards to provide or enter into contracts for the provision of programs for the identification, examination, prevention and resolution of alcohol and drug abuse problems".

Suicide Prevention: No state policy.

HIV, STD, and Pregnancy Testing and Counseling: No state policy.

Immunity of Liability: Statute 72-53,104 (1984) grants immunity of liability to any school district, governing body, and employee who in good faith reports or takes action in assisting, or referring for assistance to any medical, treatment or social service agency or facility, any pupil reasonably believed to be abusing or incapacitated by the use of alcohol or other drugs."

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Immunization
     Last Updated: 11/20/2011

Detailed, current information about immunization requirements by state is maintained by the National Network for Immunization Information.  Select your state from the drop down box under Search for State Vaccine Requirements for School Entry."

ExemptionsStatute 72-5209 (1994) allows exemption from immunization requirements under the following circumstances: (1) An annual written statement signed by a licensed physician stating the physical condition of the child is such that the tests or vaccinations would seriously endanger the life or health of the child, or (2) A written statement signed by one parent or guardian that the child is an adherent of a religious denomination whose religious teachings are opposed to such tests or inoculations.

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Accommodation
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Staff with HIV
     Last Updated: 1/16/2006
No state policy.
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Students with HIV
     Last Updated: 1/16/2006
No state policy.
Pregnant or Parenting Students
     Last Updated: 11/20/2011

Kansas has no state law or administrative rule that addresses attendance for pregnant or parenting students, nor does the state require districts to offer alternative programs for such students. However, Statutes 72-3603 (1990) and 72-3607 (1990) provide funding guidelines for local parent education programs.

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Individual Health Plan for Students
     Last Updated: 11/20/2011

Regulation 91-40-1 (2000) defines other health impairments" under the Individual with Disabilities Education Act to include a child with a chronic or acute health problem. Statute 72-987 (1999) describes the content of an individualized education program to include a statement of the special education and related services provided to a child to enable academic and extracurricular progress.

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Coordination/ Implementation
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Coordinating or Advisory Councils
     Last Updated: 11/20/2011

State Level: Statute 72-964 (1999) establishes a state special education advisory council and Statute 72-8502 (1988) creates the Teaching and School Administrative Professional Standards Advisory Board.

Local Level: No state policy.

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School Health Program Coordinators
     Last Updated: 8/18/2008

State Level: No state policy.

Local Level: No state policy.

Confidentiality
     Last Updated: 11/20/2011

Student Health-Related Records: Statute 72-6214 (1976) incorporates the requirements of FERPA.

Student Health-Related Services:  No state policy.

Limitations on Student Surveys
     Last Updated: 1/16/2006

No state policy.

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