Last Reviewed by State Dept of Education: 12/1/2012
Contact us with corrections or additions Illinois Last Updated: 10/21/2014
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Curriculum and Instruction
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Health Education
     Last Updated: 12/26/2012

Mandate: The Critical Health Problems and Comprehensive Health Education Act, 105 ILCS 110/3 (2009), and  State Board of Education 23 Illinois Administrative Code Ch. 1, Section 420 (2005) requires all Illinois elementary and secondary schools to provide health education instruction. ISBE, Rules on Instructional Program, Section n (Health Education) – 1.420 Subtitle A, Subchapter a requires students to take 16 weeks of health during the middle school (or junior high) years and another 16 weeks during high school.  The 16 weeks can be divided any way within the middle school years and within the high school years (i.e., 8 weeks in 7th grade, 8 weeks in 8th grade;  4 weeks in 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th grades, etc.)  The daily time spent should be equivalent to that of any other academic subject.  

General health education topics required in 105 ILCS 110/3 (2009) include human ecology and health, human growth and development, public and environmental health, consumer health, safety education and disaster survival, personal health habits, early prevention and detection of heart disease, diabetes and stroke, and information about cancer, including without limitation types of cancer, signs and symptoms, risk factors, the importance of early prevention and detection, and dating violence. 

The state does not have a specific health education requirement for high school graduation.

Curriculum Content: In 1997, the state approved the Illinois Learning Standards for Physical Development and Health.

State Assessment Requirement: No state policy.

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Physical Education
     Last Updated: 5/12/2008

Exemptions: HR 1028 (2004) encourages the state to end its practice of allowing waivers from school code requirements related to physical education. If a wavier is given, however, it must comply with the two requirements given in 92 HR 0333 (2002). 105 ILCS 5/27-6 (2005) allows the school board to grant students in grades 11 and 12 exemptions from physical education courses for the following reasons: (1) ongoing participation in interscholastic athletic programs, (2) enrollment in academic classes required for admission to an institution of higher learning, and (3) enrollment in academic classes required for graduation from high school, (4) involvement in for-credit marching band program (grades 9-12), and (5) involvement in a school-sponsored ROTC program. 105 ILCS 5/27-6 (2005) allows students in grades 9-12 to be excused from physical education courses if the time must be utilized to receive special education support and services.

Curriculum Content: 105 ILCS 5/27-7 (1998) calls for the State Board of Education to prepare and make available guidelines that incorporate the purposes stated in the Statute for physical education for all grades and types of schools. In 1997, the state approved the Illinois Learning Standards for Physical Development and Health.

Physical Fitness Assessment: None.

     Last Updated: 12/26/2012
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Mandate: 105 ILCS 5/27-5 (1996) mandates all school boards to provide for instruction and training in physical education of students in their schools. 105 ILCS 5/27-6 (1996) also states that students enrolled in public schools must engage in a course of physical education daily during the school day. A school board may, however, authorize an exemption for students in grades 11 and 12 for reasons specified in the Statute. Public 105 ILCS 5/27-7 (2005) requires the physical education course of study to include the development of movement skills, enhancing health-related fitness, increasing student knowledge, encouraging healthy habits and attitudes, and offering opportunities to learn how to work in cooperative group settings. The course of study must also provide students with an appropriate amount of daily physical activity as part of the regular curriculum.

Public Act 097-1102 creates a task force to promote and recommend enhanced physical education programs that can be integrated with a broader wellness strategy and health curriculum in elementary and secondary schools in this state. Some strategies that the task force is to look at include: educating and promoting leadership on enhanced physical education among school district and school officials; developing and utilizing metrics to assess the impact of enhanced physical education; promoting training and professional development in enhanced physical education for teachers and other school and community stakeholders;  and identifying and seeking local, State, and national resources to support enhanced physical education. The task force must make recommendations, based on neuroscience research on physical activity and learning, to the Governor and the General Assembly on the Illinois Learning Standards for Physical Development and Health. The task force is co-chaired by the state superintendent of schools and state health director. The new task force builds on the work of a voluntary task force, which produced the Illinois Enhanced Physical Education Strategic Plan (2012), which provides a roadmap for implementing the vision that all Illinois K-12 students participate in daily, high-quality physical education.

Asthma Awareness Education
     Last Updated: 1/9/2006
Goal 22 of the Illinois Learning Standards for Physical Development and Health provides instruction on strategies for managing chronic illnesses at the high school level.
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Emotional, Social, and Mental Health Education
     Last Updated: 9/2/2009

105 ILCS 110/3 (2006) and State Board of Education 23 Illinois Administrative Code Ch. 1, Section 420 requires comprehensive health education programs to include as a basis for curricula in elementary and secondary schools emotional, psychological, physiological, hygienic, and social responsibilities of family life. Grades 6-12 are to receive instruction in mental health and illness.

Goal 23 of the Illinois Learning Standards for Physical Development and Health recommends early high school aged students learn the immediate and long-term effects of health habits on the body system, including stress management and emotional health. Middle and junior high aged student should receive instruction in the relationship among physical, mental, and social health factors.

Per the Illinois Children's Mental Health Act (2003), the State Board of Education has developed Social and Emotional Development Standards as part of the Illinois Learning Standards for the purpose of enhancing and measuring children's school readiness and ability to achieve academic success.

 

Character Education: ICLS 105/5 27-12 (2005) requires teachers to teach students "respect, responsibility, fairness, caring, trustworthiness, and citizenship, in order to raise pupils' honesty, kindness, justice, discipline, respect for others, and moral courage" to lessen crimes and raise the standard of good character.

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HIV, STD, and Pregnancy Prevention Education
     Last Updated: 3/12/2010

Mandate: 105 ILCS 110/3 (2006) requires that curricula in all elementary and secondary schools include: human ecology and health, human growth and development, the emotional, psychological, physiological, hygienic and social responsibilities of family life, including sexual abstinence until marriage, prevention and control of disease, including instruction in grades 6 through 12 on the prevention, transmission and spread of AIDS..."  

Curriculum Content: The state neither requires schools to follow a specific curriculum nor does it provide a suggested framework, and the Illinois Learning Standards for Physical Development and Health do not specify these topics. 105 ILCS 5/27-9.1 (2006) requires that each class in comprehensive sex education offered in any of grades 6 through 12 include information on the prevention, transmission and spread of AIDS.  105 ILCS 5/27-9.1 (2006) requires that abstinence be emphasized as the only protection that is 100% effective against unwanted teenage pregnancy, STDs, and AIDS when sexually transmitted.  Additional criteria for content is outlined in the statute.

Parental Approval: 105 ILCS 110 (1999) allows parents to request, in writing to the school's principal, that a student be exempt (an "opt-out" policy).  105 ILCS 5/27-9.1 (2006) states No pupil shall be required to take or participate in any class or course in comprehensive sex education if his parent or guardian submits written objection thereto, and refusal to take or participate in such course or program shall not be reason for suspension or expulsion of such pupil."

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Nutrition Education
     Last Updated: 9/2/2009

105 ILCS 110/3 (2006) and State Board of Education 23 Illinois Administrative Code Ch. 1, Section 420 (1990) require nutrition to be included in comprehensive health education curricula in all elementary and secondary schools.

105 ILCS 5/3.137 requires the Illinois State Board of Education to establish a state goal that all districts have a wellness policy.

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Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drug Use Education
     Last Updated: 10/31/2011

Alcohol: "The medical and legal ramifications of alcohol use" are included in the list of topics specified in 105 ILCS 110/3 (2006). Goal 23 of the Illinois Learning Standards for Physical Development and Health provides instruction on healthful living and the effects of alcohol use at the middle and high school levels.

Tobacco: "The medical and legal ramifications of tobacco use" are included in the list of topics specified in 105 ILCS 110/3 (2006). Goal 23 of the Illinois Learning Standards for Physical Development and Health provides instruction on healthful living and the effects of tobacco use at the middle and high school levels.
 
Drugs: "The medical and legal ramifications of drug use" are included in the list of topics specified in 105 ILCS 110/3 (2006). Goal 23 of the Illinois Learning Standards for Physical Development and Health provides instruction on healthful living and the effects of drug use at the middle and high school levels. 105 ILCS 5/27-23.3 (2006) requires steroid abuse prevention to be taught to students in grades 7 through 12, in addition to students participating in interscholastic athletic programs.
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Injury and Violence Prevention Education
     Last Updated: 7/16/2010

Bullying/Harassment: 105 ILCS 5/27-23.7 (2007) requires school districts "to make suitable provisions for instruction in bullying prevention and gang resistance training in all grades." "Bullying prevention" includes instruction in intimidation, student victimization, sexual harassment, sexual violence and strategies for student-centered problem solving regarding bullying. Violence prevention and conflict resolution education are mandated for students in grades 4-12 under 105 ILCS 5/27-23.4 (1995). Public schools may incorporate anti-bias education and inter-group conflict resolution under 105 ILCS 5/27-23.6 (2000).

Fighting/Gangs: 105 ILCS 5/27-23.7 (2010) requires school districts "to make suitable provisions for instruction in gang resistance training in all grades and include that instruction in the courses of study regularly taught in those grades.  "Gang resistance training" includes instruction in the consequences of gang involvement, conflict resolution, cultural sensitivity, personal goal setting, and resisting peer pressure. The statute requires school boards to collaborate with state and local law enforcement agencies for the purposes of gang resistance training.

Goal 24 of the Illinois Learning Standards for Physical Development and Health recommends late elementary aged students learn the causes and consequences of conflict among youth and which situations refusal skills are necessary, such as instances of physical abuse or when approached to join a gang. Middle school and junior high aged students should learn the possible causes and consequences of conflict and violence among youth. Early high school aged students should learn the effects of conflict and violence on individual, family, and community health and strategies for conflict resolution and prevention. Late high school aged students should learn different strategies for preventing conflict and resolving differences.

Suicide and Other Self-Abuse: 105 ILCS 110/3 (2006) recommends suicide and/or signs for identification be taught as a part of the comprehensive health education program in all elementary and secondary schools.

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Staff
Requirements for All Educators Regarding Health Education
     Last Updated: 6/5/2009

Professional Development: 105 ILCS 5/10-22.39 (2009) requires in-service training for teachers, guidance counselors and other school personnel who work with students in grades 7-12 in the identification of warning signs of suicidal behavior in adolescents and teens and intervention and referral techniques. It also requires an in-service training once every two years for school personnel who work with pupils on communicating and listening to youth victims of domestic or sexual violence and expectant or parenting youth and connecting them to appropriate in-school services and other agencies and programs. The statute also requires a training program for school personnel every two years by persons in expertise in anaphylactic reactions and management.

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Requirements for Health Educators
     Last Updated: 9/2/2009

Professional Development: Teachers receiving the Initial certificate must teach for four years and at the end of that time must have completed the professional development necessary to move to a Standard certificate. Holders of the Standard certificate must renew every five years by demonstrating they have complied with the professional development requirements of Standard certificate holders by completing the renewal options available under State Board of Education 23 Administrative Code Part 25, Subpart J (2005).

Pre-service Requirement: The minimum requirement for prospective health teachers in elementary and middle grades prior to licensure is a bachelor's degree, with no additional coursework in health. The specific details of initial licensure are outlined in State Board of Education 23 Administrative Code Ch. 1, Section 1.710 (2004) and State Board of Education 23 Administrative Code Ch. 1, Section 1720 (2005). For prospective health teachers in high school, a candidate is required to have a minimum of 24 semester hours in health, in addition to a bachelor's degree. The specific details of licensure are outlined in State Board of Education 23 Administrative Code Ch. 1, Section 1730 (2004).

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Requirements for Physical Educators
     Last Updated: 9/16/2011
Professional Development: Teachers receiving the Initial certificate must teach for four years and at the end of that time must have completed the professional development necessary to move to a Standard certificate. Holders of the Standard certificate must renew every five years by demonstrating they have complied with the professional development requirements of Standard certificate holders by completing the renewal options available under State Board of Education 23 Administrative Code Part 25, Subpart J (2005).  

Pre-service Requirement: Candidates must complete a state approved program for physical education that is based on state content and teacher standards. Candidates must pass the state basic skills, content knowledge and assessment of professional teacher tests to obtain the Initial certificate. The specific details of initial licensure are outlined in State Board of Education 23 Administrative Code Ch. 1, Section 1.710 (2004), 23 Administrative Code Ch. 1, Section 1720 (2005).
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Requirements for School Nurses
     Last Updated: 12/26/2012

Pre-service Requirement: State Board of Education 23 Administrative Code Ch 1-a, Section 1.760 (1987) requires school nurses to hold a School Service Personnel Certificate with the appropriate endorsement. The school nurse endorsement requires school nurses to possess a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution, be licensed as a registered professional school nurse in Illinois pursuant to the Nursing and Advanced Practice Nursing Act, 225 ILCS 65 (1998), complete an Illinois approved program for the preparation of school nurses, and successfully complete the required certification examinations.

Professional Development: Required to renew certification and to renew RN license. 

Student-to-Nurse Ratio: None specified.

Requirements for Non-Certified Personnel to Administer Medication
     Last Updated: 12/26/2012

Pre-service Requirement: Per Sec 10-22.21b, school nurses and non-certified registered professional nurses registered nurses are the only non-administrative personnel who may be required to administer medication to students.

Professional Development: Not applicable.

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Requirements for School Counselors
     Last Updated: 9/2/2009

Pre-service Requirement: State Board of Education 23 Administrative Code Ch. 1-a, Section 1.760 requires school counselors to hold a Type 10 or 73 Certificate, which requires a candidate to complete an approved school counselor preparation program and pass the relevant content and basic skills tests as outlined in  State Board of Education 23 Administrative Code Ch. 1-b, Section 23.110 (2002). A school counselor must also have completed a practicum and internship in counseling school-aged children.

Professional Development: None specified.

Student-to-Counselor Ratio: None specified.

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Requirements for School Psychologists
     Last Updated: 9/2/2009

Pre-service Requirement: State Board of Education 23 Administrative Code Ch. 1-a, Section 1.760 requires school psychologists to hold a Type 10 or 73 Certificate, which requires a candidate to complete an approved school psychologist preparation program and pass the relevant content and basic skills tests as outlined in State Board of Education 23 Administrative Code Ch. 1-b, Section 23.130 (2002).

Professional Development: None specified.

Student-to-Psychologist Ratio: None specified.

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Requirements for School Social Workers
     Last Updated: 9/2/2009

Pre-service Requirement::State Board of Education 23 Administrative Code Ch. 1-a, Section 1.760 requires school social workers to hold a Type 10 or 73 Certificate, which requires a candidate to have a master's degree in social work, with a specialization in school social work, from a Council on Social Work Education accredited program and pass the relevant content and basic skills tests as outlined in State Board of Education 23 Administrative Code Ch. 1-b, Section 23.140 (2002).

Professional Development: State Board of Education 23 Administrative Code Ch. 1-b, Section 23.140 requires school social workers to participate in professional development as a competency for employment.

Student-to-Social Worker Ratio: None specified.

Requirements for Food Service Personnel
     Last Updated: 7/14/2008

Pre-service Requirement: None specified.

Professional Development: None specified.

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Requirements for Athletic Coaches
     Last Updated: 7/19/2008

Pre-service Requirement: None specified.

Professional Development: None specified.

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Health Promoting Environment
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Wellness Policies
     Last Updated: 12/15/2008

Additional Content Requirements: None

Guidance Materials: The State Board of Education and the Illinois Nutrition Education and Training Program provides districts with wellness policy resources, including a Local Wellness Policy Toolkit (2005) that includes an action plan checklist, a needs assessment and annual evaluation tool, a model policy developed under a USDA Team Nutrition grant, and other resources for developing local wellness policies. The State Board of Education also adopted a State Goal on Wellness Policy (2007).

Other: 105 ILCS 5/2-3.137 (2005) requires the State Board of Education, the Department of Health, and the Department of Human Services to convene an interagency working group to publish model wellness policies and programs. Further, a School Wellness Policy Taskforce must be created to identify barriers to implementing wellness policies, recommend how to reduce the barriers, recommend statewide nutrition standards, and evaluate the effectiveness of the wellness policies. Taskforce members and reports can be found at http://www.isbe.net/nutrition/htmls/wellness_policy.htm.

Additional Accountability Requirements:  None.

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School Meals Program
     Last Updated: 9/20/2011

Food Services: State Board of Education 23 Illinois Administrative Code Ch. 1, Section 305.10 (1978) provides for the free lunch program, the National Child Nutrition Program, and the federal Child Nutrition Program. 105 ILCS 125/4 (2005) mandates that every public must have a free lunch program. 105 ILCS 126/20 (2007) requires school districts to promulgate a plan to have summer breakfast or lunch (or both) service programs in which 50% or more students are eligible for free and/or reduced lunch and have a summer program.

State Board of Education 23 Illinois Administrative Code Ch. 1, Section 305.15 (2006) requires that all schools participating in the free lunch and breakfast programs adhere to the following regulations regarding food and beverage sales to students in grade eight and below during the regular school day (Also outlined in the School-Based Child Nutrition Programs Administrative Handbook (2008).  Beverages sold to students shall include only (1) flavored, or plain whole, reduced fat (2%), low-fat (1%), or nonfat milk, (2) reduced fat and alternative dairy beverages (i.e., rice, nut or soy milk or any other USDA-approved alternative beverage), (3) fruit and vegetable drinks containing 50% or more juice, (4) non-flavored, -sweetened nonnon-carbonated water, (5) yogurt or ice based fruit smoothie that contains less than 400 calories and no added sugars and is made from fresh or frozen fruit or fruit drinks containing at least 50% fruit juice, (5) any beverage exempted from USDA's list of Foods of Minimal Nutritional Value.  In addition, all schools participating in the free lunch and breakfast programs in which grades five and below are operating must prohibit the sale of all confections, candy and potato chips to students during meal periods.

The School-Based Child Nutrition Programs Administrative Handbook (2008) outlines requirements for foods sold to students in participating schools in the food service area during meal periods. Any foods sold outside of the reimbursable meal to grades Pre-K–12 in the food service area during meal periods cannot include any FMNV (chewing gum and certain candies [hard candy, jellies and gums, marshmallow candies, fondant, licorice, spun candy, and candy coated popcorn]) unless exempted by the USDA. Schools with grades 5 and below must prohibit the sale to students of all confections, candy, and potato chips during meal periods. Foods sold to grades 8 or below outside the food service area or within the area other than during meal periods shall include only nuts, seeds, nut butters, eggs, cheese packaged for individual sale, fruits or non-fried vegetables, or low-fat yogurt products; or any food item that meets all of the following criteria:

  • Total calories from fat do not exceed 35 percent
  • Total calories from saturated fat do not exceed 10 percent
  • Total amount of sugar by weight does not exceed 35 percent; and 
  • Calories do not exceed 200.

Adequate Time to Eat: No state policy.

School Breakfast: 105 ILCS 125/2.5 (2005) requires the state board of education to fund a breakfast incentive program and make grants available for school boards and welfare centers who agree to start a school breakfast program with first priority to those schools with more than 40% on free and reduced priced meals.

Food Allergies105 ILCS 5/2-3/148 (2009) requires the State Board of Education, in conjunction with the Department of Public Health to develop and make available to each school board guidelines for the management of students with life-threatening food allergies. The guidelines must include the following: (1) education and training for school personnel on the management of students with life-threatening food allergies, including training related to the administration of medication with an auto-injector, (2) procedures for responding to life-threatening reactions to food, (3) a process for the implementation of individualized health care and food allergy action plans, and (4) protocols to prevent exposure to food allergens. Each school board is then required to develop a policy based on the guidelines developed for the management of students with life-threatening food allergies. The Guidelines for Managing Life-threatening Allergies in Illinois Schools (2011) encompass these requirements.

Farm-to-School: HB 0078 (2009) requires the Departments of Agriculture, Public Health and Education to establish the Farm Fresh Schools Program, a grant program for local schools.

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Competitive Foods in School
     Last Updated: 10/21/2014

State Board of Education 23 Illinois Administrative Code Ch. 1, Section 305.15 (2006) requires that all schools participating in the free lunch and breakfast programs adhere to the following regulations regarding food and beverage sales to students in grade eight and below during the regular school day (Also outlined in the School-Based Child Nutrition Programs Administrative Handbook (2008). Beverages sold to students shall include only (1) flavored, or plain whole, reduced fat (2%), low-fat (1%), or nonfat milk, (2) reduced fat and alternative dairy beverages (i.e., rice, nut or soy milk or any other USDA-approved alternative beverage), (3) fruit and vegetable drinks containing 50% or more juice, (4) non-flavored, -sweetened nonnon-carbonated water, (5) yogurt or ice based fruit smoothie that contains less than 400 calories and no added sugars and is made from fresh or frozen fruit or fruit drinks containing at least 50% fruit juice, (5) any beverage exempted from USDA's list of Foods of Minimal Nutritional Value. In addition, all schools participating in the free lunch and breakfast programs in which grades five and below are operating must prohibit the sale of all confections, candy and potato chips to students during meal periods.

The School-Based Child Nutrition Programs Administrative Handbook (2008) outlines requirements for foods sold to students in participating schools in the food service area during meal periods. Any foods sold outside of the reimbursable meal to grades Pre-K–12 in the food service area during meal periods cannot include any FMNV (chewing gum and certain candies [hard candy, jellies and gums, marshmallow candies, fondant, licorice, spun candy, and candy coated popcorn]) unless exempted by the USDA. Schools with grades 5 and below must prohibit the sale to students of all confections, candy, and potato chips during meal periods. Foods sold to grades 8 or below outside the food service area or within the area other than during meal periods shall include only nuts, seeds, nut butters, eggs, cheese packaged for individual sale, fruits or non-fried vegetables, or low-fat yogurt products; or any food item that meets all of the following criteria:  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Total calories from fat do not exceed 35 percent
  • Total calories from saturated fat do not exceed 10 percent
  • Total amount of sugar by weight does not exceed 35 percent; and
  • Calories do not exceed 200. 
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    Fundraising Exemptions:

    Rule 305 (School Food Service) (2014) (no link available) creates a phased out process that is different at the elementary school (ES) and middle school/high school (MS/HS) level. For MS/HS, in year one, there are 36 exemption days, and nine starting in year two. For ES, there are nine in year one, and zero starting in year two. Schools must adopt a policy, within their local wellness policy that details the procedure to request a fundraiser and how it will be approved or denied. Schools must also keep, for at least three years, a list of all exempted fundraising days.

     

    There are no limits on the number of foods and beverages that may be sold, nor on the number of organizations or clubs to which a school may grant permission to fundraise on an exempted fundraising day.  Schools must adopt policies, contained within their local wellness policy, that state the procedure to be used to request an exempted fundraising day and the process and criteria to review and approve or deny a request.  Schools must also maintain a list for no less than three years of the exempted fundraising days held. 

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    Physical Activity Other Than Physical Education
         Last Updated: 10/31/2011

    General Physical Activity Requirement: No state policy. However 105 ICLS 5/2.137(2005) requires the State Board of Education to establish a program that recognizes schools that have implemented programs that increase the physical activity of students and have adopted policies/programs to promote healthy nutritional choices. Public Act 096-1223 (2010) requires the State Board of Education to develop and maintain a nutritional and physical activity best practices database. The database must contain results of any wellness-related fitness testing done by local school districts, as well as information on successful programs and policies implemented by local school districts designed to improve nutrition and physical activity in the public schools. The database must be readily accessible to all local school districts statewide.

    Recess or Physical Activity Breaks: No state policy. However, recess may count toward the daily physical education mandate 105 ILCS 5/27-6 (1996) at the elementary level as long as it is supervised by a certified teacher.

    Recess Before Lunch: No state policy.

    Walking/Biking to School: 20 ILCS 2705/2705-317 (2002) requires the State Board of Education, in consultation with the Department of Transportation, to establish and administer a Safe Routes to School Program under which grants from federal and State transportation funds are awarded to local governmental agencies seeking to provide bicycle facilities (such as paths), sidewalks, crossing guards, and traffic-calming measures to enable children to bicycle or walk safely to school. Two of the areas grants may focus on are encouraging increased walking and bicycling among students and identification of current and potential walking and bicycling routes to school.

    Organized Sports
         Last Updated: 8/21/2011

    Interscholastic Athetlcs: No state policy.

    Concussion or Sports-Related Head Injury: 70 ILCS 1205 (2011) requires  the state board of education to adopt a policy regarding student athlete concussions and head injuries that is in compliance with policies of the Illinois High School Association. It also requires the Illinois High School Association to provide educational materials to districts that describe the nature and risk of head injuries. Districts must use these materials to educate coaches, student athletes and parents or guardians of student athletes of the nature and risk of concussions and head injuries, including continuing to play after a head injury or concussion.  School boards must adopt a policy regarding student athlete concussions and head injuries that is in compliance with the protocols, policies, and by-laws of the Illinois High School Association. Information on the school board’s concussion and head injury policy must be a part of any written instrument that a school district requires a student athlete and his or her parents or guardian to sign before participating in practice or interscholastic competition.

    Automated External Defibrillator (AED): 210 ILCS 74 (2010) requires schools to have an AED on site along with a trained AED user available during activities or events sponsored and conducted or supervised by their employees.

    Sports-Related Drug Testing: The Illinois High School Association, the organization that governs participation in interscholastic athletics, requires random testing of high school athletes who have qualified as individuals or as members of a team for selected state series competition. The Performance-Enhancing Drug Testing Policy (2008) outlines the requirements.

    Safe and Drug-Free Schools
         Last Updated: 10/6/2008

    Public Act 94-0600 (HB 2693) (2005) creates the School Safety Drill Act that establishes minimum requirements and standards for public and private schools to follow when conducting school safety drills and when reviewing school emergency and crisis response plans.

    Fighting/Gangs: No state policy.

    Weapons: No state policy.

    Drugs and Alcohol: 105 ILCS 5/10-21.4a (1997) requires " the principal to utilize resources of proper law enforcement agencies when the safety and welfare of students and teachers are threatened by illegal use of drugs and alcohol". 105 ILCS 5/10-21.10 (no date available) prohibits the use or possession of pocket pagers due to their connection with the possession, sale, delivery, and trafficking in drugs and other substances. 105 ILCS 5/10-22.10a (no date available) allows school boards to adopt policies to authorize school officials to enlist the aid of local law enforcement to conduct reasonable searches of school grounds and lockers for illegal drugs.

    Collaboration with Law Enforcement105 ILCS 5/10-20.14 requires the parent-teacher advisory committee, in cooperation with local law enforcement agencies, to develop policy guideline procedures to establish and maintain a reciprocal reporting system between the school district and local law enforcement agencies regarding criminal offenses committed by students. 105 ILCS 5/10-22.10a allows school boards to adopt policies to authorize school officials to enlist the aid of local law enforcement to conduct reasonable searches of school grounds and lockers for illegal drugs.

    Bullying, Harassment and Hazing
         Last Updated: 7/16/2010

    Bullying/Harassment: 105 ILCS 5/27-23.7 (2010) defines bullying and prohibits it in the school environment on the basis of actual or perceived race, color, religion, sex, national origin, ancestry age, marital status, physical or mental disability, military status, sexual orientation, gender-related identity or expression, unfavorable discharge from military service, association with a person or group with one or more of the aforementioned actual or perceived characteristics, or any other distinguishing characteristic. No student shall be subject to bullying during any school-sponsored education program or activity, while in school, on school property, on school buses or other school vehicles, at designated school bus stops waiting for the bus, at schools-sponsored or school-sanctioned events or activities, or through the transmission of information from a school computer, school computer network or other similar electronic school equipment. Bullying make take various forms, including without limitation one or more of the following: harassment, threats, intimidation, stalking, physical violence, sexual harassment, sexual violence, theft, public humiliation, destruction of property, or retaliation for asserting or alleging an act of bullying. 

    105 ILCS 5/27-23.7 (2010) requires each school district and non-public, non-sectarian elementary or secondary school to create and maintain a policy on bullying. The policy must be communicated to the students and their parent or guardian annually, updated every 2 years and filed with the State Board of Education. The statute also creates the School Bullying Prevention Task Force and outlines its responsibilities.

    105 ILCS 5/10-20.14 (2002) requires the school board, with the parent-teacher advisory committee and community based organizations, to include provisions in the student discipline policy to address students who have demonstrated behaviors that put them at risk for aggressive behavior, including without limitation bullying.

    Cyberbullying105 ILCS 5/27-23.7 (2010) prohibits bullying (as defined in the statute) in the school environment and includes in its definition of bullying electronic communications. Bullying is specifically prohibited through the transmission of information from a school computer, a school computer network, or other similar electronic school equipment.

    105 ILCS 135/1-2 (2008) defines harassment through electronic communications. The definition includes "making any obscene comment, request, suggestion or proposal with an intent to offend," and "threatening injury to the person or to the property of the person to whom the electronic communication is directed or to any of his family or household members." Violation of the provisions of the statute will result in a class B misdemeanor.

    Hazing: 720 ILCS 120/5 (1996) defines hazing as a person who knowingly requires the performance of an act by a student or other person in a school, college, university or other educational institution, for purpose of induction or admission into any group, organization or society associated with or connected with that institution, if the act is not sanctioned or authorized by the institution and the act results in bodily harm.

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    Crisis Management/Emergency Response
         Last Updated: 12/15/2008

    Response and Management Plans105 ILCS 128 (2005) School Safety Drill Act requires all public and nonpublic schools to review and update emergency and crisis response plans for each school building annually and to conduct a minimum of three evacuation drills (at least one with the local fire department), one bus evacuation drill, one tornado/shelter–in place drill, and one strongly encouraged law enforcement drill.  A one-page report upon conclusion of each school’s annual review is required to be submitted to each party that participates in the review and to the appropriate regional superintendent of schools.  Non-public schools are required to submit the one-page report to the Office of the State Fire Marshall.

    Reporting Incidents of Violence: 105 ILCS 5/10-20.14 (2002) requires the parent-teacher advisory committee, in cooperation with local law enforcement agencies, to develop policy guideline procedures to establish and maintain a reciprocal reporting system between the school district and local law enforcement agencies regarding criminal offenses committed by students.

    Tobacco Use
         Last Updated: 10/24/2006

    105 ILCS 5/10-20.5b (1995) prohibits the use of tobacco on school property by any school personnel, student, or other person when such property is being used for any school purposes.

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    Air Quality
         Last Updated: 1/9/2011
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    Green Cleaning: 105 ILCS 140 (2007) requires all elementary and secondary public schools and non-public schools with 50 or more students to establish a “green cleaning policy” and exclusively purchase and use environmentally-sensitive cleaning products pursuant to the guidelines and specifications for schools established by the Illinois Green Government Coordinating Council.  One of the goals of “green cleaning” is to reduce the harmful chemicals that are in conventional cleaning products that contribute to indoor air pollution and are asthma triggers. If adopting a “green cleaning” policy is not economically feasible or if such adoption would result in an increase in the cleaning costs of the school, the school may request an exemption for product categories (not exemption from the requirement) in which three comparable green cleaning products are higher than the product currently in use. The exemption is valid for one year and must be renewed.

    Pesticide Use
         Last Updated: 6/22/2009

    105 ILCS 5/10-20.46 (2009) requires each school district to adopt a procedure to comply with the requirements of the Lawn Care Products Application and Notice Act and the Structural Pest Control Act105 ILCS 5/34-18.37 (2009) requires the Board of Education to adopt a procedure to comply with the requirements of the Lawn Care Products application and Notice Act and the Structural Pest Control Act. 415 ILCS 65/3 (2009) requires school districts to either (1) maintain a registry of parents and guardians of students who have registered to receive written or telephonic notification before the application of pesticides to school grounds and to notify persons on that list before having pesticides applied to school grounds, or (2) provide written or telephonic notification to all parents and guardians of students before pesticide application to school grounds. Written notification may be included in newsletters, bulletins, calendars or other correspondence by the school district, but posting on a bulletin board is not sufficient. Notification by telephone must be given at least 4 business days before application.

    225 ILCS 235/10.2 (2004) requires each school to adopt an integrated pest management program that utilizes preventive techniques and appropriate uses of pesticides. Written notification to parents, guardians, and staff two days prior to pesticide application in school buildings is also required by 225 ILCS 235/10.3 (2004).


     

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    Playground/Facility Safety
         Last Updated: 12/15/2008

    105 ILCS 5/2-3.12 (2008) requires school boards to maintain and operate every facility under their jurisdiction in full and continuous compliance with the Health Life Safety Code for Public Schools. Includes requirements for building permits/certificates of occupancy, annual inspections by the regional superintendent, annual fire safety inspections by qualified fire officials, and decennial inspections by licensed architects or engineers.

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    Student Services
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    Screening for Health Conditions
         Last Updated: 12/26/2012

    77 IAC 665.120 requires health examinations for students. Section 665.140 requires a physical examination prior to entering kindergarten or first grade, sixth grade and prior to entering ninth grade. Lead screening is a required part of the examination. 77 IAC 665.150 requires the examination to be completed on the Certificate of Child Health Examination Form.

    Vision and Hearing77 IAC 675 requires hearing screening annually for grades K-3. 77 IAC 685 requires vision screening requires vision screening in kindergarden (or 1st grade if no kindergarden), 2 and 8, all special education classes and transfer students. 77 IAC 665.610 requires all children enrolling in kindergarten to have an eye examination.

    Chronic Health Conditions: 105 ILCS 5/27-8.2 (2005) requires diabetes screening for Type 2 diabetes to be a part of each student's health examination.

    Body Mass Index (BMI) Screening77 IAC 665.150 requires BMI to be included in the physical examination.

    Dental: 77 IAC 665.410  requires students in kindergarten, second, and sixth grade to have and show proof of a dental exam by a licensed dentist before May 15th. 

    Diabetes: 
    77 IAC 665.700 requires a diabetes screening as a part of the required health examination. 77 IAC 665.710 outlines the requirements of the diabetes screening.

     

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    Administration of Medications
         Last Updated: 12/26/2012

    Staff-Administration: State Board of Education 23 Administrative Code Ch. 1-b, Section 23.120 (2002) outlines the standards of a school nurse to include the administering and monitoring medication and treatment given in school. This code is, however, subject to local policy regarding the administration of medication at school.

    105 ILCS 5/22-30 (2011) allows a school district or nonpublic school to authorize a school nurse to administer an epinephrine auto-injector to a student or any personnel authorized under a student’s Individual Health Care Action Plan or Illinois Food Allergy Emergency Action Plan and Treatment Authorization Form. It also allows authorization of a school nurse to administer an epinephrine auto-injector to any student that the school nurse in good faith professionally believes is having an anaphylactic reaction. The statute provides for immunity from liability, except in cases of wanton and willful conduct. Schools are allowed to maintain a supply of epinephrine auto-injectors in a locked, secure location. The school supply of epinephrine may be used by any student authorized to self-administer, as outlined in the statute. When a student does not have an epinephrine auto-injector or a prescription on file, the school nurse may use the school supply to respond to an anaphylactic reaction, under a standing protocol from a physician. (1998) requires local school boards to develop a medications policy for the administration of medication in schools and provide a copy of the policy to parents or guardians of each student.

    105 ILCS 5/10-22.21b (2000) limits the administration of medication during school hours and during school-related activities to situations in which it is necessary for the critical health and well-being of the student. The code only permits certified school nurses and non-certificated registered professional nurses to administer medication. Each school district must devise a program for the administration of medications that includes designation of the staff member to administer the medication, documentation of each dose of medication, long-term effects, and any medication errors. Medications should also be stored in a separate locked drawer or cabinet, fixed to the wall if it is a controlled substance, and in the refrigerator separate from food products when needed. The specifics of suggested procedures are outlined in the Recommended Guidelines for Medication Administration in Schools (2000).

    Public Act 096-1485 (2010) requires, in schools that have a student with diabetes, all school employees to receive training in the basics of diabetes care. Delegated aides shall be trained to perform the tasks necessary to assist a student with diabetes. Requirements of the training are outlined in the statute. The act also requires a parent or guardian to submit a diabetes care plan for a student with diabetes who seeks assistance with diabetes care at school. The plan authorizes delegated care aides to assist a student with diabetes in accordance with the care plan. It also

    Self-Administration of Asthma Medication: 105 ILCS 5/22-30 (2006) requires a school to permit the self-administration of medication by a student with asthma, provided that the parents or guardians provide written authorization for self-administration and a written statement from the student's licensed health care provider with the name and purpose of the medication, the prescribed dosage, and the time or circumstances the medication is to be administered is provided. The act further instructs school districts to inform parents in writing that its employees are not liable for any injury arising from the self-administration of medication by the student. The parents are then required to sign a statement acknowledging that school district and its employees are exempt from liability. According to this statute, students may possess and use the medication while in school, while at a school-sponsored activity, while under the supervision of school personnel, or before or after normal school activities.

    Self-Administration of Anaphylaxis Medication: 105 ILCS 5/22-30 (2006) requires a school to permit a student to self-administer an epinephrine auto-injector, provided that the parents or guardians provide written authorization for self-administration and a written statement from the student's licensed health care provider with the name and purpose of the medication, prescribed dosage, and the time or circumstances the medication is to be administered is provided. The act further instructs school districts to inform parents in writing that its employees are not liable for any injury arising from the self-administration of medication by the student. The parents are then required to sign a statement acknowledging that school district and its employees are exempt from liability. According to this statute, students may possess and use the medication while in school, while at a school-sponsored activity, while under the supervision of school personnel, or before or after normal school activities.

    Psychotropic Medications: 105 ILCS 5/10-20.36  (2002) requires each school board to adopt and implement a policy prohibiting any disciplinary action that is based totally or in part on the refusal of a student's parent or guardian to administer or consent to the administration of psychotropic or psychostimulant medication to the student. 

    Storage and Record-Keeping: No state policy.

     

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    Counseling and Mental Health Services
         Last Updated: 7/24/2008

    Requirement to Provide Services: Per State Board of Education Memorandum (2004), each school district is required to review and update its current special education policies to ensure that children with behavioral or emotional disorders are receiving all of the related service that they need, including psychological counseling services, as part of a free appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment". These policies and procedures must be in compliance with federal IDEA requirements. Additional guidance is outlined in this memorandum. 

    Identification of Students with Mental or Emotional Disorders: No state policy. 

    Substance Abuse: No state policy.

    Suicide Prevention: No state policy.

    HIV, STD, and Pregnancy Testing and Counseling: No state policy.

    Immunity of Liability: No state policy.

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    Immunization
         Last Updated: 5/18/2011

    Detailed, current information about immunization requirements by state is maintained by the National Network for Immunization Information.  Select your state from the drop down box under Search for State Vaccine Requirements for School Entry."

    Exemptions410 ILCS 315/2 allows exemption from immunization requirements under the following circumstances: (1) The parent or guardian of the child objects to immunization requirements on the grounds that the administration of immunizing agents conflicts with his religious tenets or practices, or (2) A physician states that the physical condition of the child is such that the administration of one or more of the required immunizing agents would be detrimental to the health of the child.

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    Accommodation
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    Staff with HIV
         Last Updated: 1/9/2006

    No state policy.

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    Students with HIV
         Last Updated: 1/9/2006

    No state policy.

    Pregnant or Parenting Students
         Last Updated: 10/24/2006

    As outlined in 105 ILCS 5/26-1 (1996), pregnant or parenting students in Illinois are not exempt from attendance, except in cases where a student is unable to attend school due to a complication arising from pregnancy, which must be certified by a physician. The state does not require districts to offer alternative programs for pregnant or parenting students.

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    Individual Health Plan for Students
         Last Updated: 10/24/2006

    The state does not have a policy regarding individualized health plans for students in need of health services. However, 105 ILCS 5/10-20.35 (2002) encourages school districts to create and use an emergency medical information form that is filled out by the parent or guardian for bus drivers and emergency medical technicians for students with special needs or medical conditions.

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    Coordination/ Implementation
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    Coordinating or Advisory Councils
         Last Updated: 8/17/2008

    State-level: 105 ILCS 110/5 (1999) establishes an advisory committee to assist and advise the State Board of Education in implementing the Critical Health Problems and Comprehensive Health Education Act. 105 ILCS 130/3 (1997) establishes a Sex Education Advisory Board for the purpose of making policy recommendations for the distribution of sex education material and recommend criteria for using motion picture, literature, and educational programs. 20 ILCS 3950/3 (1998) creates the Governor's Council on Health and Physical Fitness to encourage state citizens to participate in more active health and fitness activities.

    Local-level: 105 ILCS 5/10-20.14 (2002) calls for the establishment of parent-teacher advisory committees to work with law enforcement agencies to develop policy guidelines for school bus safety. The school board must also consult with the committee when including provisions in student discipline policies.

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    School Health Program Coordinators
         Last Updated: 8/18/2008

    State-level: No state policy.

    Local-level: No state policy.

    Confidentiality
         Last Updated: 8/18/2008

    Student Health-Related Records: 105 ILCS 10/6 (1999) does not permit the disclosure of student records except to individuals stated in the statute.

    Student Health-Related Services: No state policy.

    Limitations on Student Surveys
         Last Updated: 1/9/2006

    No state policy.

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