Last Reviewed by State Dept of Education: 9/1/2006
Contact us with corrections or additions Hawaii Last Updated: 6/16/2014
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Curriculum and Instruction
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Health Education
     Last Updated: 7/22/2013

Mandate: State Board of Education Policy 2100 (1999) charges the Department of Education with providing an academic program that will allow students to take part in learning experiences that include health and fitness, however, no specific content, grades, or levels are specified. Students are required to complete credit in health education newly-developed proficiency based for high school graduation per State Board of Education Policy 4540 (2004).

The state Wellness Guidelines (2006), which schools are require to implement over a four year period through 2010-11, require 45 minutes of standards-based health education classes per week for grades K-3, 55 minutes per week for grades 4-5, 107 minutes per week for elementary grade 6, and 200 minutes per week for secondary grades 6-12. 

Curriculum Content: The state has adopted Content and Performance Standards for Health (2005). However, Hawaii does not require schools to follow a specific curriculum.

State Assessment Requirement: None.

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Physical Education
     Last Updated: 9/22/2009

Mandate: State Board of Education Policy 4540 (2006) requires one credit of physical education for high school graduation.

The state Wellness Guidelines, which schools are required to implement over a four year period through 2010-11, require 45 minutes of physical education classes per week for grades K-3, 55 minutes per week for grades 4-5, 107 minutes per week for elementary grade 6, and 200 minutes per week for secondary grades 6-12.  The Wellness Guidelines also specify that physical activity may not be used as punishment and schools may not withold physical activity as punishment.

Exemptions: None specified.

Curriculum Content: The state has adopted Physical Education Content Standards (2005) for grades K-12 that serves as a guideline, but is not a specific curriculum for schools to follow.

Physical Fitness Assessment: None.

Asthma Awareness Education
     Last Updated: 1/9/2006

Not specifically required.

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Emotional, Social, and Mental Health Education
     Last Updated: 8/25/2009

The Content and Performance Standards for Health (2005), while not requiring specific curricula, does set standards. Standard 3 recommends students in grades K-12 learn health-enhancing personal coping and stress management strategies

Character Education: State Board of Education Policy 2109 (2005) requires character education to be incorporated into the curriculum for all grades modeled by moral leadership from school administrators, teachers, and students.

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HIV, STD, and Pregnancy Prevention Education
     Last Updated: 3/8/2010

Mandate: State Board of Education Policy 2110 (1995) requires the Department of Education to instruct students that “abstention from sexual intercourse is the surest and most responsible way to prevent unintended pregnancies, sexually transmitted diseases such as HIV/AIDS, and consequent emotional distress,” however, grades or levels are not specified. The Content and Performance Standards for Health (2005) list sexual health among the content areas to be addressed but does not go into detail.

Curriculum ContentHRS 321-11.1 (2009) requires that sexuality education programs funded by the state must include medically accurate and factual information that is age appropriate and includes education on abstinence, contraception, and methods of disease prevention to prevent unintended pregnancy and STDs, including HIV.

The state does not require schools to follow a specific curriculum, nor does it provide curriculum resources. State Board of Education Policy 2245 (1994) on Prophylactics in the Public Schools states, “The Board of Education is committed to the health education of our students which may include, within its study of human reproduction, a discussion of birth control devices but the distribution of condoms and other prophylactic devices to students shall be prohibited in the classroom, on the school campus or at any school-related activities.”

Parental Approval: No state policy.

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Nutrition Education
     Last Updated: 9/10/2010

The state-adopted Content and Performance Standards for Health (2005) include instruction in nutrition for grades K-12, but do not require schools to follow a specific curriculum.

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Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drug Use Education
     Last Updated: 5/21/2008

Alcohol: Content and Performance Standards for Health (2005) include alcohol use prevention instruction for grades K-12, but do not require a specific curriculum to be followed.

Tobacco: The Content and Performance Standards for Health (2005) include tobacco use prevention instruction for grades K-12, but do not require a specific curriculum to be followed.

Drugs: The Content and Performance Standards for Health  (2005) include drug use prevention instruction for grades K-12, but do not require a specific curriculum to be followed.

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Injury and Violence Prevention Education
     Last Updated: 6/5/2008

Bullying/Harassment: Standard 5 of Content and Performance Standards for Health  (2005) recommends students in grades K-5 are taught strategies to avoid inappropriate communications.

Fighting/Gangs: Standard 5 of the Content and Performance Standards for Health  (2005) recommends students in grades K-3 and 9-12 are taught non-violent conflict resolution strategies, such as collaboration and negotiation.

Suicide and Other Self-Abuse Prevention: Not specifically required.

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Staff
Requirements for All Educators Regarding Health Education
     Last Updated: 6/8/2008

Professional Development: HRS 321-81 (1959) requires the department of health to conduct in training for staffs of schools and others who deal with problems involving food and nutrition.

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Requirements for Health Educators
     Last Updated: 9/10/2010

Pre-service Requirement: The minimum requirement for prospective health teachers in elementary, middle, and high school grades prior to licensure is a bachelor's degree, with no additional coursework in health. The specific details of initial licensure are outlined in Administrative Rule 8-54-9 (1998).

Professional Development: None specified.

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Requirements for Physical Educators
     Last Updated: 9/10/2010

Pre-service Requirement: The minimum requirement for prospective physical education teachers in elementary, middle, and high school grades prior to licensure is a bachelor's degree, with no additional coursework in physical education. The specific details of initial licensure are outlined in Administrative Rule 8-54-9 (1998). 

Professional Development: None specified.

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Requirements for School Nurses
     Last Updated: 6/11/2008

Pre-service Requirement: None specified.

Professional Development: None specified.

Student-to-Nurse Ratio: None specified.

Requirements for Non-Certified Personnel to Administer Medication
     Last Updated: 6/16/2008

Pre-service Requirement: HRS 320A-253 (2007) allows health aides to assist students in administering oral and topical medication, and in emergency situations, other premeasured medication. The following provisions must be met: (1) Parental authorization, (2) Medication has been prescribed by a licensed physician or other authorized practitioner, (3) Approval of the department of health, and (4) The administration of medication is necessary for the student's health and his or her attendance at school.

Professional Development: None specified.

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Requirements for School Counselors
     Last Updated: 6/23/2008

Pre-service Requirement: Although a policy is not specified, the state reports that successful completion of PRAXIS and a master's degree in counseling from an accredited university are required.

Professional Development: Hawaii Teacher Standards Board license requires PD points to maintain status.

Student-to-Counselor Ratio: ASCA recommends 250 to 1 ratio of students to school counselor.

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Requirements for School Psychologists
     Last Updated: 6/25/2008

Pre-service Requirement: None specified.

Professional Development: None specified.

Student-to-Psychologist Ratio: HRS 302A-633.5 (2000) permits the board of education to appoint school psychologists as necessary.

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Requirements for School Social Workers
     Last Updated: 7/9/2008

Pre-service Requirement: Although a policy is not specified, the state reports that a master's in social work degree from an accredited university is required.

Professional Development: Hawaii Teacher Standards Board license requires PD points to maintain status.

Student-to-Social Worker Ratio: None specified.

Requirements for Food Service Personnel
     Last Updated: 7/14/2008

Pre-service Requirement: None specified.

Professional Development: None specified.

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Requirements for Athletic Coaches
     Last Updated: 7/19/2008

Pre-service Requirement: Although a policy is not specified, the state reports that each individual must meet the following requirements: 1) Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986; 2) Criminal History Record; 3) Background check; and 4) TB Clearance.

Professional Development: All head coaches and assistant coaches, listed on the Form 435 (Application for High School Coaching Allotment), must be certified in the National Federation of High School Coaches Education Program. This certification requirement is to be completed within 2 years upon initial hire.

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Health Promoting Environment
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Wellness Policies
     Last Updated: 9/10/2010

Additional Accountability Requirements:The State Board of Education amended its Health, Wellness, and Safety Policy in 2006 to require the Department of Education to create a plan for measuring implementation of the wellness policy. Hawaii is unique in that the entire state constitutes a single school district.

Additional Content Requirements: The State Board of Education amended its Health, Wellness, and Safety Policy in 2006 to require the Department of Education to set goals for nutrition education, physical activity, and other school-based activities and create nutrition guidelines for all foods that are available on each school campus during the school day.

Guidance Materials:The Department of Education's comprehensive Wellness Guidelines document was created with input from multiple public and private stakeholders. It includes minimum standards for nutrition, nutrition and health education, physical activity and professional development, plus "how-to" suggested methods for implementation of wellness programs.

Other: None

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School Meals Program
     Last Updated: 7/22/2013

Food Services: Administrative Rule 8-37-2 (1995) requires public schools to participate in the benefits of the National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast Program, and the Community Program to the extent possible. State Board of Education Policy 6800 (2007) requires each public school to provide food services that meet nutritional needs to students at a minimum cost. HRS 302A-404 (1996) requires school lunches to be made available in every school where students are required to eat lunch.

Adequate Time to Eat: No state policy.

School Breakfast: No state policy.

Food Allergies: No state policy.

Farm-to-School: No state policy.

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Competitive Foods in School
     Last Updated: 6/16/2014

The following rules for all competitive foods and beverages on campus are compiled from the following sources: State Board of Education Policy 6810 (2007), HRS 302A-1146, the Hawaii Wellness guidelines (2006), and the Hawaii School Nutrition Standards.

Competitive Foods Vending Rules:
o    No public schools may operate stores or sell merchandise except for school lunches, milk, ice cream, candy, and products made or grown at the school, without permission from the DOE.
o    Competitive foods allowed for sale in elementary and secondary schools is limited to approved cafeteria supplementary items, and food prepared by culinary arts classes as part of their educational program.
o    Sale of competitive foods is not permitted during the school day except for principal-approved all-school events.

Competitive Foods Nutrition Rules:
o    All foods sold to students must comply with current USDA Dietary Guidelines
o    Nutrition information must be readily available near the point of purchase.
o    The following items are NOT to be sold anywhere on school property:
       § FMNVs as defined by the USDA
       § All foods listing sugar in any form as the first ingredient (such as candy)
       § Foods containing trans fats
o    All snack items sold or served on school property, including items from a la carte lines and fundraisers, provided in classrooms, or served in the reimbursable After School Snack Program must meet the following standards. Standards do not apply to fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts and seeds.
       § NO more than 8g total fat per serving (except nuts and seeds)
       § NO more than 2g saturated fat per serving
       § NO more than 200 calories
       § Zero grams of trans fat
       § NO more than 200 mg sodium
       § NO more than 8g sugar
       § Preferably at least 2g dietary fiber (not required)

Competitive Beverages:
o    Beverage selections in vending machines available to students shall only contain healthy beverages as approved by the Dept of Ed and must comply with current USDA Dietary Guidelines.
o    Sale of approved beverages via vending machines allowed throughout the day EXCEPT during meal serving periods when only water may be sold.
o    Approved Beverages for All Students:
§ Water without flavoring, additives or carbonation
§ 100% fruit juice
§ Low-fat and nonfat milk:
·         Lactose-free and soy beverages are included
·         Flavored milk with no more than 22g of total sugar per 8 oz portion
§ Caffeine-free, with the exception of trace amounts of naturally occurring caffeine substances
o    Approved Beverages for Secondary Students After School:
§ All of the above beverages, plus:
§ Non-caffeinated, non-fortified beverages with less than 5 cal per portion as packaged (with or without nutritive sweeteners, carbonation, or flavoring)
§ Sports drinks are not available in the school setting except when provided by the school for student athletes participating in sport programs involving vigorous activity of more than one hour’s duration.

Competitive Beverages Nutrition Rules:
o    All beverages sold to students must comply with current USDA Dietary Guidelines
o    Nutrition information must be readily available near the point of purchase.
o    The following items are NOT to be sold anywhere on school property:
       § Beverages defined as FMNVs by the USDA
       § All beverages listing sugar in any form as the first ingredient
       § Beverages containing trans fats
o    All beverage items sold or served on school property, including items from a la carte lines and fundraisers, provided in classrooms, or served in the reimbursable After School Snack Program must meet the following standards:
        § NO more than 8g total fat per serving
        § NO more than 2g saturated fat per serving
        § All beverages, except for water and 1% or less fat milk, may not exceed 12 oz.
        § Products containing 2% milk fat or more may not exceed 8 oz
        § Limit sugar
 

Fundraising Exemptions:

As of July 1, 2014, all fundraisers must meet USDA's Smart Snacks standards.

 

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Physical Activity Other Than Physical Education
     Last Updated: 10/30/2011
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Recess or Physical Activity Breaks: State Board of Education Policy 1110-6 (2006) requires the Department of Education to establish regulations or guidelines for physical activity. The resulting Wellness Guidelines (2006) requires public schools to provide all students in all grades with at least 20 minutes a day of supervised recess, during which schools must encourage moderate to vigorous physical activity. At the middle and high school levels, the policy is interpreted as requiring schools to provide the means to be physically active (intramurals, equipment, etc). The policy must be implemented by the 2010-2011 school year.

The Wellness Guidelines (2006) state that schools may not use physical activity as a punishment nor withhold opportunities for physical activity as punishment.

 
     Last Updated: 7/22/2012

General Physical Activity Requirement: No state policy. However State Board of Education Policy 1110-6 (2006) requires the Department of Education to establish regulations or guidelines for physical activity. The resulting Wellness Guidelines (2006) requires public schools to provide all students in all grades with at least 20 minutes a day of supervised recess, during which schools must encourage moderate to vigorous physical activity.

Recess Before Lunch:
No state policy.

Walking/Biking to School
: Statute 291C-A (2012) creates a safe routes to school program within the department of transportation and creates a position of safe routes to school program coordinator.A county designated office, through the county safe routes to school program coordinator, and in consultation with the department of education, department of health, and Hawaii Association of Independent Schools, must provide safe routes to school funds for school-based and community-based workshops and infrastructure and non-infrastructure projects that will reduce vehicular traffic and congestion, encourage walking and bicycling, and promote health and safety around Hawaii’s schools.

Organized Sports
     Last Updated: 12/30/2013

Interscholastic Athletics: No state policy.

Concussion or Sports Related Head Injury: HB 2273 (2012) requires the department of education and the Hawaii High School Athletic Association to develop a concussion educational program for students and student athletes 14-18 years old. The program must include:

(1)    Education of students, student athletes, parents, sports officials, school faculty and staff, and school administrators on the signs and symptoms of a concussion and what to do if someone demonstrates any of them.

(2)    Annual educational session for coaches and athletic trainers about the signs and symptoms of a concussion

(3)    The need for mandatory removal of a student from the athletic activity if demonstrating any signs or symptoms of a concussion.

(4)    The need for a concussed student’s licensed health care provider to evaluate the student to determine ability to return to play.

(5)     Monitoring of a student’s return to physical activity by the school’s certified athletic trainer (if there is one employed by the school).

The policy also requires the development of an education program for every school that is a member of the Hawaii High School Athletic Association on how to develop a school concussion awareness plan. Requirements of the plan are outlined in the policy. Amongst other things, it requires annual concussion awareness education for parents and students who participate in a school’s athletic team or programs. The parents and students must sign a concussion information sheet certifying that they have attended and received concussion awareness education. It also requires immediate removal from a game, practice or other activity for any student who exhibits signs, symptoms, or behaviors consistent with a concussion. To return to play, students must obtain written clearance from a licensed health care provider prior to returning to academics and athletics which may require the student to follow a plan designed to aid them recovery.

Automated External Defibrillator (AED):
No state policy.

Safe and Drug-Free Schools
     Last Updated: 8/25/2009

State Board of Education Policy 4200 (1991) requires, "The Department of Education [to] provide a caring environment conducive to the physical, mental, social, and emotional well-being of students while they are participating in school activities". State Board of Education Policy 2290 (1998) reserves the right for every student to receive an education in a safe and orderly environment.

State Board of Education Policy 4201 (2002) states that it is the belief of the Board that public school staff should maintain an orderly, safe environment conducive to learning. State Board of Education Policy 1110-6 (1995) assigns the provision of a safe and healthy work and learning environment for all public school students, employees, and other persons under its jurisdiction as the Department of Education's fundamental responsibility.

Fighting/Gangs: Education Rule 8-19-6 prohibits assault and disorderly conduct by any student in the public school system during school hours, on school premises, or during department-supervised activities on or off school property. Violation of this policy constitutes a Class A offense in the case of assault and a Class B offense in the case of disorderly conduct. Education Rule 8-19-13 extends the same policy to summer school, violation resulting in dismissal from summer school. State Board of Education Policy 4201 allows school personnel to "quell a disturbance threatening physical injury to self or others.

State Board of Education Policy 4400 (1991) implements a zero-tolerance policy towards youth gangs in schools.

Weapons: HRS 302A-1134.6 (2000) implements a zero-tolerance policy, stating "Any child who possesses, sells, or uses a dangerous weapon or switchblade knife, while attending school or while attending department-supervised activities held on or off school property, may be excluded from attending school for up to ninety-two school days, as determined by the principal and approved by the superintendent or other individuals". HRS 302A-1134 (2003) also states that any child found in possession of a firearm shall be excluded from attending school for not less than one year.

Further, Education Rule 8-19-6 prohibits the possession or use of dangerous weapons or instruments and firearms by any student in the public school system during school hours, on school premises, or during department-supervised activities on or off school property. Violation of this policy constitutes a Class A offense. Violation of the firearm's policy results in the dismissal of the offending student for a period of at least one year. Violation of the dangerous weapons (including switchblade or any improperly used knife) policy results in exclusion from attending school for up to 92 school days. Education Rule 8-19-13 extends the same policy to summer school, violation resulting in dismissal from summer school.

State Board of Education Policy 4201 allows school personnel to "obtain possession of weapons or other dangerous objects which are within the control of a student."

Drugs and Alcohol: State Board of Education Policy 4220 (2005) requires the Department of Education "develop regulations and procedures for public schools in an effort to eliminate alcohol and drug use and distribution on their respective campuses. The regulations, guidelines, and procedures developed shall be scientifically based and within the confines of state statutes and constitutional compliance".

Education Rule 8-19-6 prohibits the possession, use, or sale of drug paraphernalia or illicit drugs by any student in the public school system during school hours, on school premises, or during department-supervised activities on or off school property. Violation of this policy constitutes a Class A offense. Education Rule 8-19-13 extends the same policy to summer school, violation resulting in dismissal from summer school.

Collaboration with Law Enforcement: State Board of Education Policy 1710-8 (1970) states that schools shall cooperate fully with law enforcement.

Bullying, Harassment and Hazing
     Last Updated: 3/30/2012

Bullying/Harassment: Education Rule 8-19-6 (2009) prohibits bullying and harassment by any student in the public school system during school hours, on school premises, or during department-supervised activities on or off school property. Violation of this policy constitutes a Class B offense. Education Rule 8-19-13 (2001) extends the same policy to summer school, violation resulting in dismissal from summer school.

HRS 302A (2011) defines bullying, cyberbullying and harassment.  The definition of bullying includes conduct that is based on a student’s actual or perceived race, color, national origin, sex, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, religion, physical appearance and characteristic, or socio-economic status; or a student’s association with a person or group with one or more of these actual or perceived characteristics.

It requires the Department of education to maintain and monitor anti-bullying and anti-harassment policies for grades K-12 and maintain and enforce anti-bullying, cyberbullying and harassment procedures outlined in the statute. The procedures include(1)  effective publicizing of the policies, (2) annual training on how to intervene in situations of bullying, (3) cyberbullying or harassment, (4) investigation of violations, (5) reporting and response mechanisms, (6) making available statewide statistics concerning bullying, cyberbullying, and harassment, (7) filing of complaints for failure to comply, (8) establishing clear lines of accountability, (9) requirement for immediate reporting of incidents, (10) requirement for prompt investigation of reports or complaints of bullying, cyberbullying, or harassment, (11) range of response to incidents of bullying, (12) provision of appropriate referrals and prohibition of reprisal or retaliation against a person reporting; (13) provisions for anonymous reporting, and (14) annual collection, reporting, and analyzing of incident data.

Cyberbullying: Education Rule 8-19-6 (2009) defines cyberbullying and prohibits it by any student in the public school system during school hours, on school premises, or during department-supervised activities on or off school properties.

HRS 302A (2011) cyberbullying is defined as an act or acts exhibited by one student or group of students to another student or group of students that (1) are conveyed by electronic transmission via the Internet, a cell phone, a PDA or a wireless hand-held device, (2) cause mental or physical harm to the student or group of students that receives the electronic transmission; and (3) are sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive to create an intimidating, threatening, or abusive educational environment. The cyberbullying policy HRS 302A applies to electronic technology usage and electronic communications that occur on all public elementary and secondary school premises, at any school-sponsored functions or activities, on school-sponsored functions or activities, on school-sponsored transportation, and on school computers, networks, forums and mailing lists.

Hazing: State Board of Education Policy 4210 (1997) states that the practice of hazing as a part of athletics or other co-curricular and social activities is prohibited. Staff is required to inform students of this policy.

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Crisis Management/Emergency Response
     Last Updated: 8/25/2009

HRS 707-716 (1992) considers a terrorist threat against a public servant, including an educational worker, a first degree offense, class C felony.

Response and Management Plans: No state policy.

Reporting Incidents of Violence: HRS 302A-1002 (1996) requires the board to adopt rules requiring teachers, officials, and other department employees to report to the appropriate authorities any knowledge of crimes committed or planning to be committed on school property during school hours or during activities supervised by the school. Specifically, crimes related to arson, assault, disorderly conduct, dangerous weapons, firearms, and harassment amongst others.

Education Rule 8-19-19 (2001) further requires teachers, officials, or other employees of the department to report to the principal or their designee any Class A or B offense which has or may be committed against a student, teacher, official, or other department employee. The principal or their designee must then, after investigation, report the offense to the district superintendent within five days of determination. State Board of Education Policy 4201 (2002) requires school personnel to report incidences of use of force or physical intervention to the principal. Education Rule 8-19-21 (2001) states that any teacher, official, or other district employee who fails to report Class A or B offenses may be disciplined by oral warning, written warning, suspension without pay, demotion, or dismissal. The superintendent of education shall furnish an annual written notice to all schools and districts of this policy.

Tobacco Use
     Last Updated: 1/9/2006

Rule §8-31-3 (1993) prohibits smoking and use of other tobacco products at all times in all school buildings, facilities, and school vehicles. Education Rule §8-31-4 (1993) requires the principal to give written notice by letter to all students enrolled in community schools and to school employees and to post written signs for all visitors and guests stating that the school is a tobacco-free school. HRS §302A-102 (2004) also prohibits the use of tobacco at all public schools or at public functions. However, the department is also to provide breaks throughout the work day for public employees during which they may smoke at off-campus locations.

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Air Quality
     Last Updated: 1/9/2011

HB 1295 (2005) requires the department of education to ensure that paint and buildings of school facilities must be tested for asbestos prior to any renovations or painting.

Green Cleaning: Statute 302A-1509 (2010) requires the department of education to require that all public school facilities give first preference, when feasible, to the purchase and use of environmentally-sensitive cleaning and maintenance products that have been approved by the Green Seal program pursuant to section 321-26.5, for use in public school facilities. The categories of cleaning are outlined in the statute. Statute 321-26.5 (2010) requires the Department of Health to maintain a list of products that have been approved by the EPA's Design for the Environment program or the Green Seal program for public school facilities for use as a first preference guideline when purchasing and using environmentally-sensitive cleaning and maintenance products.

Pesticide Use
     Last Updated: 1/2/2006

No state policy.

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Playground/Facility Safety
     Last Updated: 1/2/2006

No state policy.

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Student Services
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Screening for Health Conditions
     Last Updated: 7/1/2010

Vision and Hearing: No state policy.

Chronic Health Conditions: No state policy.

Body Mass Index (BMI) Screening: No state policy.

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Administration of Medications
     Last Updated: 6/11/2009

Staff Administration: Pre-service Requirement: HRS 320A-253 (2007) allows health aides to assist students in administering oral and topical medication, and in emergency situations, other premeasured medication. The following provisions must be met: (1) Parental authorization, (2) Medication has been prescribed by a licensed physician or other authorized practitioner, (3) Approval of the department of health, and (4) The administration of medication is necessary for the student's health and his or her attendance at school.

Self-Administration of Asthma Medication: HRS 302A-1164 (2004) requires the department of education to permit the self-administration of medication by a student for asthma or other potentially life-threatening illnesses. The law also allows students to carry an inhaler and requires the student's parent or guardian to sign a statement acknowledging that the district and its employees are not liable for any injury arising from the self-administration of medication. HB 1550 (2005) permits students to self-administer medication for asthma provided written authorization has been given by the student's physician and a signed statement by the parents/guardians that the department and its employees are not to incur any liability for any injury resulting from the self-administration of medication. The student is also permitted to carry an inhaler if does not endanger him/herself or others from the misuse of the inhaler.

Self-Administration of Anaphylaxis Medication:  HRS 302A-1164 (2004) requires the department of education to permit the self-administration of medication by a student for a potentially life-threatening illnesses. The law also allows students to carry an auto-injector epinephrine and requires the student's parent or guardian to sign a statement acknowledging that the district and its employees are not liable for any injury arising from the self-administration of medication. HB 1550 (2005) permits students to self-administer medication for anaphylaxis or other potentially life-threatening illnesses provided written authorization has been given by the student's physician and a signed statement by the parents/guardians that the department and its employees are not to incur any liability for any injury resulting from the self-administration of medication. The student is also permitted to carry an auto-injectable epinephrine if does not endanger him/herself or others from misuse.

Psychotropic Medications: No state policy.

Storage and Record-keeping: Health Administrative Rule 11-146-3 (1983) (no link available) requires the school health aide to maintain a confidential school record of each student.

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Counseling and Mental Health Services
     Last Updated: 8/25/2009

Requirement to Provide Services: State Board of Education Policy 2130 (1999) requires all department of education schools to provide guidance, counseling, and related services for the academic, personal, social, and career development of each student.

HRS 302A-442 (2000) states, "The department of health, within the funds available, shall be responsible for the related services of school health, mental health, psychological, and medical services for evaluation or diagnostic purposes, and, within the funds available, shall provide for those exceptional children who need these services and who attend public school in the State".

Identification of Students with Mental or Emotional Disorders: No state policy.

Substance Abuse: No state policy.

Suicide Prevention: No state policy.

HIV, STD, and Pregnancy Testing and Counseling: No state policy.

Immunity of Liability: No state policy.

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Immunization
     Last Updated: 5/18/2011

Detailed, current information about immunization requirements by state is maintained by the National Network for Immunization Information.  Select your state from the drop down box under Search for State Vaccine Requirements for School Entry."

ExemptionsHRS 302A-1156 (1996) allows exemption from immunization requirements under the following circumstances: (1) A licensed physician certifies that the physical condition of the child is such that immunizations would endanger the child's life or health, or (2) A parent, custodian, guardian or any other person in loco parentis to a child objects to immunization in writing on the grounds that the immunization conflicts with that person's bonafide religious tenets and practices.  If at any time there is danger of an epidemic from any of the communicable diseases for which immunization is required under sections 302A-1154 (1996) to 302A-1163 (1996), no exemption from immunization against the disease will be recognized. Quarantine is considered be a legal alternative to immunization.

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Accommodation
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Staff with HIV
     Last Updated: 1/2/2006

No state policy.

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Students with HIV
     Last Updated: 11/6/2006

Administrative Rule §11-156-6b (2001) states "HIV-infected students do not pose a transmission risk to others in the school setting and therefore shall not be excluded from the school setting based on their HIV status."

Pregnant or Parenting Students
     Last Updated: 8/25/2009

State Board of Education Policy 2140 (2002) states, The Department of Education shall encourage and facilitate pregnant and parenting students to graduate from high school and shall offer a variety of pregnant/parenting student programs to meet the diverse needs of these students."

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Individual Health Plan for Students
     Last Updated: 1/9/2006

Education Rules §8-56-38 (2000) and §8-56-2 (2000) require that school health services must be provided to students and included in an individualized education plan.

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Coordination/ Implementation
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Coordinating or Advisory Councils
     Last Updated: 8/14/2008

State-level: No state policy.

Local-level: No state policy.

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School Health Program Coordinators
     Last Updated: 8/18/2008

State-level: No state policy.

Local-level: No state policy.

Confidentiality
     Last Updated: 8/25/2009

Student Health-Related Records: State Board of Education Policy 4610 (2004) addresses Student Information and Confidential Records. Health Rule 11-146-3 requires school health aides to maintain a confidential school record of each student. Education Rule 8-6-6 (1983) prohibits the department from disclosing or authorizing disclosure of personal records to any person other than employee, student, parent, or library patron to whom the record pertains except for reasons listed in the Rule.

Student Health-Related Services: State Board of Education Policy 4610 (2004) states, "Information relating to individual students or former students in the public schools shall not be divulged or released by Department of Education (Department) personnel, except as authorized by the individual student, parent, or guardian, permitted by the Department, or specified by law". Although the statute does not specifically mention student services, HRS 453D-13 (2005) does not require a mental health counselor from disclosing any information that may have been acquired during mental health counseling services.

Limitations on Student Surveys
     Last Updated: 8/25/2009

State Board of Education Policy 4610 (2004) states, No questionnaire or other device for securing any kind of information, opinions, or statistical data from students shall be permitted in the public schools, except where the request is approved by the Department".

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