Last Reviewed by State Dept of Education: 12/1/2012
Contact us with corrections or additions District of Columbia Last Updated: 8/11/2014
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Curriculum and Instruction
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Health Education
     Last Updated: 4/22/2013
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Mandate: Rule 5-E2304 (1994) requires all schools to provide health instruction within a planned, sequential, pre-K-12 comprehensive school health education curriculum that includes the physical, mental, emotional, and social dimensions of health and well-being. The Rule defines comprehensive school health education and specifies eleven required content areas (specified under Curriculum content).

Section 402 § 38-824.02 requires public schools and public charter schools to provide health education to students in Grades Kindergarten through 8 as follows: (1) School years 2010-2011 to 2013-2014: an average of at least 15 minutes per week or the same level of health education as provided in school year 2009-2010, whichever is greater; and (2) School year 2014-2015 and after: an average of at least 75 minutes per week.

Section 602 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 requires that on or before January 15 of each year, each public school and public charter school must submit information about the average amount of weekly health education that students receive in each grade to the Office of the State Superintendent of Education. This information must be posted online if the school has a website and make the form available to parents in its office. The Office of the State Superintendent of Education is required to post the information on its website within 14 days of receipt.

Curriculum Content:  Rule 5-E2304 (1994) requires instruction in the following content areas of health education: HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases; Human sexuality and family; Prevention and control of disease; Nutrition and dietary patterns that contribute to disease; Tobacco, alcohol, and other drug education; Physical education; Parenting; Coping with life situations; CPR, first aid, safety; injury and violence prevention; Consumer health; and Environmental health.

Section 402 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 states that the health education required by this section shall meet the curricular standards adopted by the State Board of Education. DC State Board of Education adopted Health Education Standards in 2007.
 

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Physical Education
     Last Updated: 4/21/2013

Mandate: Section 402 § 38-824.02 Requires public schools and public charter schools to provide physical education as follows:

  • Grades K-5: School Years 2010-11 to 2013-14: an average of at least 30 minutes per week or the same level of physical education as provided in school year and school year 2014-2014 and after, an average of at least 150 minutes per week.
    Grades 6-8: School years 2010-2011 to 2013-2014: an average of at least 45 minutes per week or the or the same level of physical education as provided in school year 2009-2010, whichever is greater, and school year 2014-2015 and after, an average of at least 225 minutes per week.
  • At least 50% of physical education class time must be devoted to actual physical activity, with as much class time as possible spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.
Additionally, Section 602 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 requires each public and public charter school to submit information about the average amount of weekly physical education that students receive in each grade to the Office of the State Superintendent of Education by January 15th of each year. This information must also be posted online to the school website (if applicable) and make the form available to parents in its office. The Office of the State Superintendent of Education shall post the information on its website within 14 days of receipt.

Exemptions: No state policy.

Curriculum Content: Section 402 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 requires physical education to meet the curricular standards adopted by the State Board of Education. The Physical Education Standards (2007) specify the concepts and skills that students are to know and be able to do in the area of physical education by the time they graduate from high school.

State Assessment Requirement: None. 
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Emotional, Social, and Mental Health Education
     Last Updated: 4/21/2013

Rule 5-E2304 (1994) requires public schools to provide health instruction within a planned, sequential, pre K-12 comprehensive school health education curriculum that includes the physical, mental, emotional and social dimensions of health and well-being.  Comprehensive school health education shall be defined as age appropriate instruction that improves the knowledge, skills, and behaviors of students so they choose a health enhancing lifestyle and avoid behaviors that may jeopardize their immediate long term health status.  Eleven content areas, including “coping with life situations”, are identified.

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HIV, STD, and Pregnancy Prevention Education
     Last Updated: 4/21/2013

Mandate:  Rule 5-E2304 (1994) requires public schools to provide health instruction within a planned, sequential, pre K-12 comprehensive school health education curriculum that includes the physical, mental, emotional and social dimensions of health and well-being. Comprehensive school health education is defined as age appropriate instruction that improves the knowledge, skills, and behaviors of students so they choose a health enhancing lifestyle and avoid behaviors that may jeopardize their immediate long term health status. Eleven content areas, including HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, are identified.

Rule 5-E2305 (1979) requires human sexuality and reproduction course content to be taught sequentially in grade levels pre-K through 12. The content of the courses shall be appropriate to the age group of the students receiving instruction.

Curriculum Content:  Rule 5-E2305 (1979) requires public schools to offer, as part of the regular curriculum, instruction in human sexuality and reproduction which shall include, but not be limited tothe following: information on human anatomy, physical changes during adolescence, menstruation, intercourse, pregnancy, childbirth, lactation, venereal disease, contraception, abortion, homosexuality, reduction of infant mortality, improvement of pregnancy outcomes, and awareness and prevention of rape and other sex offenses; and discussion of the process of making personal decisions in matters involving parenting and sexuality.

Per Rule 5-E2305 (1979) all textbooks used for instruction in the area of human sexuality and reproductionmust be included in the list oftextbooks submitted annually for approval by the Board of Education. All instructional materials, including textbooks, teachers’ manuals, audio-visual aids, and other supplementary materials thatare used for instruction in human sexuality and reproduction shall be available for inspection and review by parents or guardians of students receiving instructionin human sexuality and reproduction.

Parental Approval: Rule 5-E2305 (1979), Prior to offering human sexualityand reproduction courses or programs, the principal shall notify in writing the parents or guardians of minor students. A minor student shall be excused fromparticipating in human sexuality and reproduction instruction upon receiptby the principal of written notification fromthe student’s parent or guardian (opt out).

According to the Department of Health’s Condom Availability Policy (CAP) (2009), School nurses supported by the Department of Health-Community Health Administration can provide sexual health counseling, education and distribution of barrier methods in accordance with the scope of services specified by the Community Health Administration. Students will receive information on barrier methods during HIV and STD risk reduction classes conducted by agencies and organizations that are approved by the Local Education Agency. All students will have the option of receiving individual health education by the school nurse during the school year and they will be notified of this option by flyer. Nurses are required to provide monthly activity reports with non-identifiable student information. 

 Individuals that have received training approved by the Department of Health HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD and Tuberculosis Administration (HAHSTA) may, with the authorization of the Local Education Agency, provide sexual health education, counseling, and condom distribution services to students individually and in groups. These sessions will stress the risks of sexual activity including the potential exposure to sexually transmitted diseases including HIV. Students who are engaging in sexual activity will be instructed on safer sex practices and the proper use of male and female condoms and dental dams. Schools participating in the Supplemental Condom Availability Services shall provide reports to HAHSTA on the services provided to students.

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Nutrition Education
     Last Updated: 4/21/2013

Rule 5-E2304 (1994) requires public schools to provide health instruction with a planned, sequential, pre K-12 comprehensive school health education curriculum that includes the physical, mental, emotional and social dimensions of health and well-being. Comprehensive school health education shall be defined as age appropriate instruction that improves the knowledge, skills, and behaviors of students so they choose a health enhancing lifestyle and avoid behaviors that may jeopardize their immediate long term health status. Eleven content areas, including “nutrition and dietary patterns that contribute to disease”, are identified for which the Superintendent shall ensure that health instruction is taught through the use of appropriate monitoring and establishment of minimum proficiencies or learning outcomes. 

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Injury and Violence Prevention Education
     Last Updated: 4/21/2013

Rule 5-E2304 (1994) states that public schools shall provide health instruction within a planned, sequential, pre K-12 comprehensive school health education curriculum that includes the physical, mental, emotional and social dimensions of health and well-being. Comprehensive school health education shall be defined as age appropriate instruction that improves the knowledge, skills, and behaviors of students so they choose a health enhancing lifestyle and avoid behaviors that may jeopardize their immediate long term health status. Eleven content areas, including injury and violence prevention are identified.

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Staff
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Requirements for School Nurses
     Last Updated: 4/21/2013

Pre-service Requirement:

Professional Development:

Student-to-Nurse Ratio: Section 602 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 states that or before January 15 of each year, each public school and public charter school shall submit the following information to the Office of the State Superintendent of Education regarding each of its campuses: whether the school has full-time, part-time, or no nurse coverage; the name and contact information of the school’s nurse. This information shall also be posted online if the school has a website and make the form available to parents in its office. The Office of the State Superintendent of Education shall post the information on its website within 14 days of receipt.

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Requirements for School Psychologists
     Last Updated: 4/22/2013

Pre-service RequirementRule: 5-E1659 (1993) requires a master’s degree in school, psychology, educational, or clinical psychology from an accredited institution to include forty-two semester hours of graduate level coursework and five hundred clock hours of satisfactory field experience in a school setting under the supervision of a certified school psychologist. It also specifies required coursework.

Professional Development: None specified.

Student-to-Psychologist Ratio: None specified.

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Requirements for School Social Workers
     Last Updated: 4/22/2013

Pre-service Requirement: Rule: 5-E1660 (1993) requires a masters degree in social work, a valid license to practice social work in the District of Columbia, a field practicum and one year of paid professional experience, post master’s degree, in a setting providing direct services to individuals and groups of school age children and their families. It also specifies required program coursework and skills.

Professional Development: None specified.

Student-to-Social Worker Ratio: None specified.

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Requirements for Athletic Coaches
     Last Updated: 4/22/2013

Pre-service Requirement: Rule: 5-E1643 (1993) requires athletic coaches to have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution. Candidates must also complete the Coaches Education Program in which instructors are trained and certified by the American Coaching Effectiveness Program (ACEP) and the athletic department of the District of Columbia Public Schools. Forty-five clock hours to include the following: Philosophy of Coaching, Sports Psychology, Sports Pedagogy, and Sports Physiology. Thirty clock hours of training in athletic health care (including first aid and CPR) and six clock hours of drug education are also required.

Professional Development: None specified.

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Health Promoting Environment
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Wellness Policies
     Last Updated: 4/22/2013

Section 601 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 states that as required by federal law, each local educational agency is required to collaborate with parents, students, food service providers, and community organizations to develop, adopt, and update a comprehensive local wellness policy. Local wellness policies must be revised at least once every three years.

Additional Accountability Requirements:  Section 601 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 requires that local wellness policies shall be revised at least once every three years.  Public schools and public charter schools are required to promote their local wellness policy to faculty, staff, parents, and students. A copy must be: (1) posted on each school’s website, if it has one; (2) distributed to food service staff members; (3) distributed to the school’s parent/teacher organization, if it has one; and (4) made available in each school’s office. The Office of the State Superintendent of Education shall review each local wellness policy to ensure that it complies with federal requirements and shall examine whether schools comply with their policies. 

Section 602 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 requires each public school and public charter to submit the following information to the Office of the State Superintendent of Education regarding the following information by January 15th of each year: whether the school is in compliance with its local wellness policy; and where a copy of the school’s local wellness policy can be found. This information shall also be posted online if the school has a website and make the form available to parents in its office. The Office of the State Superintendent of Education shall post the information on its website within 14 days of receipt.
 
Additional Content Requirements:  Section 601 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 requires local wellness policies to include the requirements set forth in federal law and goals for: Improving the environmental sustainability of schools; increasing the use of locally grown, locally processed, and unprocessed foods from growers engaged in sustainable agriculture practices; and increasing physical activity.
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School Meals Program
     Last Updated: 8/11/2014

Food Services:  Section 202 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 outlines the nutritional standards for school meals. All breakfast, lunch, and after-school meals served to students in public schools and public charter schools or by organizations participating in the Afterschool Meal Program shall meet or exceed the federal nutritional standards set forth in applicable federal laws. 

Additionally, breakfast and lunch meals served to students in each public school and public charter school shall meet or exceed the following nutritional requirements per serving:
(a) Saturated fat: Fewer than 10% of total calories; and
(b) Trans fat: Zero grams
(c) Sodium requirements for school breakfasts, which shall not apply until August 1, 2020, provided, that public schools and public charter schools shall gradually reduce the amount of sodium served in school meals are the following: less than 430 milligrams for Grades Kindergarten through 5; less than 470 milligrams for Grades 6 through 8; and less than 500 milligrams for Grades 9 through 12. Sodium requirement for school lunches, which shall not apply until August 1, 2020, provided, that public schools and public charter schools shall gradually reduce the amount of sodium served in school meals are the following: less than 640 milligrams for Grades Kindergarten through 5; less than 710 milligrams for Grades 6 through 8; and less than 740 milligrams for Grades 9 through 12.

Section 103 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 authorizes the Healthy Schools Fund to reimburse public schools and public charter schools ten cents for each lunch meal served that meets the requirements of sections 202 and 203. Additionally, to eliminate the reduced-price copayment under section 203(b)(1), the Office of the State Superintendent of Education shall reimburse public schools and public charter schools 40 cents for each lunch meal served to students who qualify for reduced-price meals.

Section 203 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 prohibits public and public charter schools from charging students for meals if they qualify for reduced-price meals. It also requires schools to do the following: (1) provide meals that meet the dietary needs of children with diagnosed medical conditions as required by a physician; (3) solicit input from students, faculty, and parents, through tastes tests, comment boxes, surveys, a student nutrition advisory council, or other means, regarding nutritious meals that appeal to students; (4) promote healthy eating to students, faculty, staff, and parents; (5) provide at least 30 minutes for students to eat lunch; and (6) participate in federal nutritional and commodity food programs whenever possible.

Section 602 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 requires each public school and public charter school to submit the following information to the Office of the State Superintendent of Education: the name of the school’s food service vendor; whether the school’s meals meet the nutritional standards required by federal and District law; where the information required by section 205 can be found; whether the school participates in the farm-to-school program under section 301; and whether the school participates in the School Gardens Program under section 503. This information shall also be posted online if the school has a website and make the form available to parents in its office. The Office of the State Superintendent of Education shall post the information on its website within 14 days of receipt.

Adequate Time to Eat:  Section 203 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 states that public schools and charter schools shall provide at least 30 minutes for students to eat lunch.

School Breakfast:  Section 102 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 authorizes the Healthy Schools Fund to reimburse public schools and public charter schools ten cents for each breakfast meal served that meets the requirements of sections 202 and 203. Section 103 also states that to provide free breakfast meals in public charter schools under section 203(a), the Office of the State Superintendent of Education shall reimburse public charter schools as follows: (A) thirty cents for each breakfast meal served to students who qualify for reduced-price meals; and (B) the difference between the free and paid rates for breakfasts served in severe-needs schools in the District of Columbia, as determined by the USDA, to students who do not qualify for free or reduced-price meals. 

Section 203 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 requires public schools and public charter schools to offer free breakfast to all students if more than 40% of the students at the school qualify for free or reduced-price lunch. Public and charter elementary schools are required to offer breakfast in the classroom each day. Public and charter middle and high schools are required to offer alternative serving models, such as breakfast in the classroom or grab-and-go carts, each day to increase breakfast participation.
 
Food Allergies: Section 203 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 states that public and public charter schools shall provide meals that meet the dietary needs of children with diagnosed medical conditions as required by a physician.

 

     Last Updated: 8/11/2014
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Farm-to-School: Section 101 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 defines “locally grown” and “locally processed”, and requires public schools and public charter schools to serve locally grown, locally processed, and unprocessed foods from growers engaged in sustainable agriculture practices whenever possible. Preference shall be given to fresh unprocessed agricultural products grown and processed in the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.

Section 103 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 authorizes the Healthy Schools Fund to provide an additional 5 cents per lunch meal reimbursement to public schools and public charter schools when at least one component of a reimbursable lunch meal is comprised entirely of locally grown and unprocessed foods; provided, that the schools report the name and address of the farms where the locally grown foods were grown to the Office of the State Superintendent of Education.

Section 205 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 requires food service providers to provide the following information to public schools and public charter schools: (1) menu for each breakfast and lunch meal served, (2) nutritional content of each menu item, (3) ingredients for each menu item; and (4) location where fruits and vegetables served in school are grown and processed and whether growers are engaged in sustainable agricultural practices.

Public schools and public charter schools are required to post this information in the school’s office, and online if the school has a website. Public schools and public charter schools are required to inform families that vegetarian option and milk alternatives are available upon request.

Section 302 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 requires the Office of the State Superintendent of Education to, in conjunction with other agencies, community organizations, food service providers, public schools, and public charter schools, develop programs to promote the benefits of purchasing and eating locally grown and unprocessed foods that are from growers engaged in sustainable agriculture practices. At minimum, the Office of the State Superintendent of Education is required to conduct at least one program per year, such as an annual local flavor week or a harvest of the month program, in collaboration with other District agencies and nonprofit organizations.

Section 303 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 requires that the Office of the State Superintendent of Education submit an annual comprehensive report on the District’s farm-to-school initiatives and recommendations for improvement to the Mayor, the Council, and the Healthy Schools and Youth Commission. Each public school and public charter school is also required to submit information about whether the school participates in the farm-to-school program. This information must be posted online if the school has a website and make the form available to parents in its office.

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Competitive Foods in School
     Last Updated: 6/2/2014
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Marketing: Section 206 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 prohibits food and beverages that do not meet the USDA’s Healthier US Schools Challenge program at the Gold Level for competitive foods from being advertised or marketed through posters, signs, book covers, scoreboards, supplies, equipment, or other means in public schools or public charter schools. After first issuing a warning, the Office of the State Superintendent of Education may impose a penalty on public schools and public charter schools that violate the requirements, not to exceed $500 per day, paid to the Healthy Schools Fund, subject to the right to a hearing requested within 10 days after notice or imposition of the penalty is sent.
 

Fundraising:

Section 206 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 requires that all beverages and snack foods provided by or sold in public schools and public charter school or provided by organizations participating in the Afterschool Meal Program, whether through vending machines, fundraisers, snacks, after-school meals, school stores, or other means, meet the requirements of the USDA’s Healthier US Schools Challenge program at the Gold Level for competitive foods. Exceptions to this include: food and drinks available only to faculty and staff members, provided that school employees shall be encouraged to model healthy eating, food provided at no cost by parents, food sold or provided at official after-school events and adult education programs. The Office of the State Superintendent of Education may adopt standards that exceed these requirements.

 

Fundraising Exemptions:

As of July 1, 2014, all fundraisers will meet the standards outlined above, with no exemptions allowed.

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Physical Activity Other Than Physical Education
     Last Updated: 4/28/2013

Recess or Physical Activity Breaks: Section 401 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 states that schools shall have the goal for children to engage in physical activity for 60 minutes each day. Schools shall promote this goal and seek to maximize physical activity, including promoting active recess.

Recess Before Lunch: No policy

Walking/Biking to School:  No policy.

Interscholastic Athletics:  Section 401 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 states that schools shall have the goal for children to engage in physical activity for 60 minutes each day. Schools shall promote this goal and seek to maximize physical activity, including supporting athletic programs.

Organized Sports
     Last Updated: 8/11/2014

Interscholastic Athletics:  Section 401 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 states that schools shall have the goal for children to engage in physical activity for 60 minutes each day. Schools shall promote this goal and seek to maximize physical activity, including supporting athletic programs.

 

Concussion and Sports-Related Head Injury: The Athletic Concussion Protection Act of 2011 requires that an athlete suspected of sustaining a concussion during an athletic activity be removed from play and prohibited from returning until the athlete has received written clearance from a licensed health-care provider. It also requires the Department of Health to develop a training program and educational materials about the nature and risks of concussions that must be distributed to athletes and the parent or guardian of the athlete prior to their participation in athletic activity.  The athlete and the parent or guardian of the athlete shall sign a statement acknowledging receipt of the materials and return it to the organizing entity before the athlete shall be allowed to participate in the athletic activity. The policy requires the mayor to establish a training program that addresses: the nature and risk of a concussion, the criteria for removing athletes and allowing them to return, and the risks for not removing athletes from athletic activity. The Mayor is also able to expand the authority of the act to include athletic activities that are non-interscholastic school-sponsored or organized by a nongovernmental organization.

Automated External Defibrillator (AED):No policy.

Safe and Drug-Free Schools
     Last Updated: 4/28/2013

Fighting/Gangs: Section B2502.3 of Chapter B25 of Title 5 in the D.C. Municipal Regulations (DCMR) (2009) specifies that “engaging in behavior that demonstrates Gang/neighborhood crew affiliation (displaying clothing or gestures associated with Gangs) and fighting where there is no injury and no weapon” as a Tier III behaviors that, in addition to lesser consequences, may result in either on-site or off-site Suspension.

Section B2502.4 of Chapter B25 of Title 5 in the D.C. Municipal Regulations (DCMR) (2009) specifies that “fighting which creates substantial risk of or results in minor injury; and inciting others to violence or disruption” as a Tier IV that will result in off-site Suspension.  

Section B2502.5 of Chapter B25 of Title 5 in the D.C. Municipal Regulations (DCMR) (2009) specifies “assault or physical attack on student or staff; fighting which results in a serious physical injury; participating in a group fight which has been planned, causing major disruption to school day or results in substantial bodily injury; and deliberate acts that cause severe physical injury to another person(s)” as Tier V behaviors that will result in off-site Suspension or Expulsion.

Weapons: Section B2502.3 of Chapter B25 of Title 5 in the D.C. Municipal Regulations (DCMR) (2009) specifies “possession of tools or instruments which school administrators deem could be used as weapons; and fighting where there is no injury and no weapon” as a Tier III behaviors that, in addition to lesser consequences, may result in either on-site or off-site Suspension.

Section B2502.4 of Chapter B25 of Title 5 in the D.C. Municipal Regulations (DCMR) (2009) specifies “possession of a weapon or replica or imitation of a weapon (including water guns), other than weapons subject to the requirements of the Gun-Free Schools Act; and using an article that is not normally considered a weapon to intimidate or threaten another individual” as a Tier IV that will result in off-site Suspension.  

Section B2502.5 of Chapter B25 of Title 5 in the D.C. Municipal Regulations (DCMR) (2009) specifies “using an article that is not normally considered a weapon to injure another individual; threatened use, or transfer of any weapon; Use, Possession, or bringing to school a loaded or unloaded firearm, as defined in 18 U.S.C. § 921 (2000), including but not limited to pistols, blank pistols, starter pistols, revolvers, rifles, and shotguns; any behavior that violates the Gun-Free Schools Act; and assault with a weapon” as Tier V behaviors that will result in off-site Suspension or Expulsion. It also provides a specific list of items that are considered weapons.

Drugs and Alcohol: Section B2502.3 of Chapter B25 of Title 5 in the D.C. Municipal Regulations (DCMR) (2009) specifies “possession or use of tobacco; use of alcohol; use of marijuana, controlled dangerous substances, imitation controlled substances, inhalants, other intoxicants, or drug paraphernalia; and unauthorized Possession, Use, or Distribution of over-the-counter medication” as a Tier III behaviors that, in addition to lesser consequences, may result in either on-site or off-site Suspension.

Section B2502.5 of Chapter B25 of Title 5 in the D.C. Municipal Regulations (DCMR) (2009) specifies “selling or distribution of marijuana, prescription drugs, controlled dangerous substances, imitation controlled substances, inhalants, other intoxicants, controlled or drug paraphernalia; the possession or distribution of alcohol; the possession of drug paraphernalia or controlled substance, irrespective of the amount or type, pursuant to the criminal statutes of the District of Columbia, codified at D.C. Official Code § 48-1101 et seq. (2001)” as Tier V behaviors that will result in off-site Suspension or Expulsion.

Bullying, Harassment and Hazing
     Last Updated: 4/28/2013

Sec. 4 of the Youth Bullying Prevention Act of 2010 requires the creation of bullying prevention policies by educational institutions that are enforced: on property (including electronic communication), at sponsored functions, on sponsored transportation, and through electronic communication to the extent that it is directed at a youth and is substantially interferes with the youth’s ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, or privileges provided by the educational institution. Each policy must contain: the definition of bullying provided in the Act, a statement prohibiting bullying, a statement that the policy applies to functions sponsored by the educational institution, the expected code of conduct, and a list of consequences for violating the policy (possible actions are identified), a procedure for reporting bullying or an act of retaliation for reporting bullying, a procedure for prompt investigation, an appeal process, and a statement that prohibits retaliation against any person that reports bullying. These policies must be submitted to the task force for review. Additionally, information on the bullying prevention policy must be incorporated into new employee training and each educational institution shall develop a plan for publicizing the policy.  

Sec. 8 of the Youth Bullying Prevention Act of 2010 requires educational institutions to provide annual reports regarding the aggregate incidents of bullying to the Mayor.

Sec. 7 of the Youth Bullying Prevention Act of 2010 allows for the establishment of an annual bullying prevention program for youth, which shall align with established health education standards.

Section B2502.3 of Chapter B25 of Title 5 in the D.C. Municipal Regulations (DCMR) (2009) lists “Bullying, or using humiliating, or intimidating language or behavior, including Internet Bullying” as a Tier III behavior that, in addition to lesser consequences, may result in either on-site or off-site Suspension.

Cyberbullying:  Sec. 4 of the Youth Bullying Prevention Act of 2010 includes cyberbullying as an activity that must be included in bullying prevention policies and programs. It is defined as electronic communications on the property of educational institutions, and through electronic communication to the extent that it is directed at a youth and is substantially interferes with the youth’s ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, or privileges provided by the educational institution. 

Section B2502.3 of Chapter B25 of Title 5 in the D.C. Municipal Regulations (DCMR) (2009) lists “Bullying, or using humiliating, or intimidating language or behavior, including Internet Bullying” as a Tier III behavior that, in addition to lesser consequences, may result in either on-site or off-site Suspension.

Hazing:  Section B2502.3 of Chapter B25 of Title 5 in the D.C. Municipal Regulations (DCMR) (2009) lists “hazing” as a Tier III behavior that, in addition to lesser consequences, may result in either on-site or off-site Suspension.

Tobacco Use
     Last Updated: 4/28/2013

Section B2502.3 of Chapter B25 of Title 5 in the D.C. Municipal Regulations (DCMR) (2009) lists “possession or use of tobacco” as a Tier III behaviors that, in addition to lesser consequences, may result in either on-site or off-site suspension.

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Air Quality
     Last Updated: 4/28/2013

Section 501 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 establishes an environmental programs office in the Office of Public Education Facilities Modernization that shall promote the Environmental Protection Agency’s Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools Program to reduce exposure to environmental factors that impact asthma among children and adults in public schools.

Sections 18-2148.3 and 20-900.1 of the District of Columbia Municipal Regulations (18 DCMR § 2148.3 and 20 DCMR § 900.1) includes limits for idling of gasoline or diesel powered motor vehicles on public or private space, including public vehicles for hire, buses with a seating capacity of 12 or more, and school buses. Specific limitations are outlined in the statute.

Pesticide Use
     Last Updated: 5/30/2013

Section 501 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 establishes an environmental programs office in the Office of Public Education Facilities Modernization that shall establish an integrated pest management program. 

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Student Services
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Administration of Medications
     Last Updated: 10/15/2013

 Staff Administration: Code 38-651.05 (2008) allows an employee or agent trained and certified according to Code 38-651.04 (2008) to administer medication to a student with a valid medication action plan, provided that the responsible person has delivered the medication to the school, the employee or agent is under the general supervision of a licensed health practitioner, and, except in emergency circumstances, the responsible person has administered the initial dose of a new medication. Responsible person is defined as a parent, legal guardian, legal custodian, foster parent, or other adult charged with the supervision of the student, and in the case of a student 18 years  or older, the student him or herself.

Code 38-651.06 (2008)states that no employee or agent of a school shall administer medication in emergency circumstances to any student unless they have been trained  and certified under the medication administration training program described in Code 38-651.04 (2008). Code 38-651.04 (2008) outlines the certification requirements. Code 38-651.06 (2008) states that a student does not need to have a known diagnosis or a medication action plan to receive treatment in emergency circumstances from a trained employee or agent of the school. The Code also provides for a procedure in which a responsibly person may request that a minor not receive treatment in an emergency.

Code 38-651.06 (2008) requires the Mayor to obtain a standing order by at least one physician licensed in DC that identifies the specific medications that may be administered in emergency circumstances and provides appropriate administration instructions.

Self-Administration of Asthma Medication:  Code 38-651.02 (2008) allows students to carry and self-administer medication at the school where they are enrolled, at school-sponsored activities and while on school-sponsored transportation, in order to treat asthma, anaphylaxis or other illness.  In order to do so, the responsible person must submit a valid medication action plan to the school, as described in Code 38-651.03.

Self-Administration of Anaphylaxis Medication: Code 38-651.02 (2008) allows students to carry and self-administer medication at the school where they are enrolled, at school-sponsored activities and while on school-sponsored transportation, in order to treat asthma, anaphylaxis or other illness.  In order to do so, the responsible person must submit a valid medication action plan to the school, as described in Code 38-651.03 (2008).

Psychotropic Medications: No policy.

Storage and Record Keeping: Code 38-651.08 (2008) outlines the requirements of maintaining records of administration of medication, medication action plans, and of employees and agents who are certified to administer medication. Code 38-651.09 (2008) allows a school to procure medication for the treatment of asthma, anaphylaxis or other illness for use in emergency circumstances. Requirements about storage are outlined in the policy.

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Counseling and Mental Health Services
     Last Updated: 5/30/2013

Requirement to Provide Services: Section 203 of the South Capitol Street Memorial Amendment Act of 2012 requires the Mayor to submit a comprehensive plan to the City Council by March 30, 2103 for the expansion of school-based behavioral health programs and services by the 2016-2017 school year. 

Identification of Students with Mental or Emotional Disorders: Section 115b of the South Capitol Street Memorial Amendment Act of 2012 establishes a program for all public, private and charter schools that provides participants with the tools needed to identify students with unmet behavioral health needs. This program also refers identified students to appropriate services for behavioral health screenings and assessments. Starting October 1, 2014, the program is mandatory for all teachers and principals in public, private and charter schools and others that are interested or that the Mayor may identify.

Section 115c of the South Capitol Street Memorial Amendment Act of 2012 requires the creation of a behavioral health resource guide for parents and legal guardians that includes information on: common signs of behavioral health issues facing youth, the roles and responsibilities of city government agencies in promoting and protecting the behavioral health of youth, how a parent or legal guardian can obtain a behavioral health screening or assessment for youth, and resources for youth behavioral health programs and services. A similar guide must also be created for youth. 

Substance Abuse
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Section 701 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010 establishes the Healthy Youth and Schools Commission with the purpose of advising the Mayor and the Council on health, wellness, and nutritional issues concerning youth and schools in the District, including substance abuse.

Suicide Prevention
: No policy.

HIV, STD, and Pregnancy Testing and Counseling
:
 According to the Department of Health’s Condom Availability Policy (CAP)  (2009), School nurses supported by the Department of Health-Community Health Administration will provide sexual health counseling, education and distribution of barrier methods in accordance with the scope of services specified by the Community Health Administration. All students shall have the option to receive private, confidential counseling upon request to the school nurse to obtain barrier methods. School nurses shall, upon request of the student, or if medically warranted, provide students with referrals for further medical services, and, or counseling. Students will be referred to their medical home, other primary care providers, free clinics, or local hospitals.

Individuals that have received training approved by the Department of Health HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD and Tuberculosis Administration (HAHSTA) may, with the authorization of the Local Education Agency, provide sexual health education, counseling, and condom distribution services to students individually and in groups. These sessions will stress the risks of sexual activity including the potential exposure to sexually transmitted diseases including HIV. Students who are engaging in sexual activity will be instructed on safer sex practices and the proper use of male and female condoms and dental dams. Schools participating in the Supplemental Condom Availability Services shall provide reports to HAHSTA on the services provided to students.
 
Immunity of Liability:
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Immunization
     Last Updated: 5/30/2013

Rule 5-E5300 (2008) requires each student to present valid written immunization certification documenting that the student has been successfully immunized in accordance with current Department of Health immunization requirements. All immunization requirements shall be established by the Department of Health, and distributed by the Public Schools, including as appropriate, advice published by public health officials and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice (ACIP). 

School officials shall maintain documentary proof of each student’s immunization certification, recorded in the student’s permanent school record. Schools must verify compliance with the immunization requirements at the following times: entry into Kindergarten, first grade, sixth grade, ninth grade; initial enrollment; and re-enrollment after more than one year’s absence from that school. 

The rule includes specific requirements schools must follow upon discovering that a student has not been properly immunized, along with guidelines for attendance for those who do not obtain the required immunizations.

The immunization requirements shall not apply to any student whose parent or guardian objects in writing to the immunization on grounds that the medical treatment or medical test is forbidden by their religion or religious beliefs and practices.
 
Exemptions: The immunization requirements of Rule 5-E5300 (2008) do not apply to any student whose parent or guardian objects in writing to the immunization on grounds that the medical treatment or medical test is forbidden by their religion or religious beliefs and practices.
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Accommodation
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Students with HIV
     Last Updated: 5/30/2013

Rule 5-E2414 (1988) states that decisions regarding the educational placement of students with AIDS, ARC and asymptomatic infection with the HIV virus shall be made on a case-by-case basis, based on the recommendation of the DC Commissioner of Public Health, taking into account both the neurological development and physical condition of the infected student and the general characteristics of the students in each education setting considered, as well as the degree of student interaction in each possible placement. If a subsequent change in condition indicated a need to reevaluate a placement decision, the reevaluation shall also be made pursuant to these same procedures. When the decision about placement has been made, the Superintendent, the school principal, the school nurse, and other personnel with a need to know shall be informed of the student’s infection and provided with guidance in regard to the students’ condition. 

Pregnant or Parenting Students
     Last Updated: 5/30/2013

Rule 5-E5800 (2001) states that pregnant or parenting TANF recipients under the age of 20 who have not completed high school shall attend high school or an approved alternate education or training program. School attendance or participation in an alternative education or training program shall be verified. If a teen fails without good cause to complete this requirement, the teen’s needs shall be excluded from the TANF benefit after adequate and timely notice has been provided and not restored until he or she complies with the school attendance requirement. Teens may not be sanctioned if they have good cause, which includes: excused absences, having a child under the age of six and no reasonable access to affordable child care resources, having special health care needs that prevent attendance, are less than 12 years old, or an extraordinary and unforeseen circumstance determined to be beyond the control of the teen. Students have the right to appeal through a fair hearing process.

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Coordination/ Implementation
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Coordinating or Advisory Councils
     Last Updated: 5/30/2013

Section 701 of the Healthy Students Act of 2010establishes the Healthy Youth and Schools Commission with the purpose of advising the Mayor and the Council on health, wellness, and nutritional issues concerning youth and schools in the District, including: (1) School meals; (2) Farm-to-school programs; (3) Physical activity and physical education; (4) Health education; (5) Environmental programs; (6) School gardens; (7) Sexual health programming; (8) Chronic disease prevention; (9) Emotional, social, and mental health services; (10) Substance abuse; and (11) Violence prevention. Specific functions of the Commission are outlined in the Act. The Commission shall be composed of 13 members who are experts in health, wellness, or nutrition; parents; teachers; or students. Requirements for appointees, Chairpersons, meetings and reports are outlined in the statute.

Confidentiality
     Last Updated: 5/30/2013

Rule 5-E2414 (1988) states that any information or record regarding a student with a communicable disease is confidential, and access to such information is to be limited to personnel with a need to know. Disclosure of any information to individuals outside of the School System, except the school nurse of school physician, shall not be made without the express written consent of the parent or guardian of the infected minor or of the adult student himself, except when it is necessary to inform the DC Commissioner of Public Health.

Student Related Health RecordsRule 5-E2603 (1996) states that personally identifiable records and records that contain personal information shall not be released by the school system or any employee of DC Public Schools without the prior written, informed consent of the students or student’s parent or guardian. Specific exceptions to this policy are listed in the Rule. All employees collecting or using personally identifiable information must receive training or instruction regarding DC Public Schools policies and procedures on the protection of the confidentiality of any personally identifiably student information collection, used or manipulated.

 

 

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