Last Reviewed by State Dept of Education: 11/1/2012
Contact us with corrections or additions Colorado Last Updated: 8/4/2014
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Curriculum and Instruction
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Health Education
     Last Updated: 11/9/2010

Mandate: Colorado does not require students to take coursework in health education, nor is it a requirement for graduation.

Curriculum Content: The state does not require schools to follow a specific curriculum framework . The Department of Education provides curriculum guidance in the Comprehensive Health and Physical Education Standards (2009). In the Colorado Comprehensive Health Education Act, Statute 22-25-104 (2000) the legislature declared that comprehensive health education is an essential element of public education in the state of Colorado" and encouraged every school district to voluntarily provide a pre K-12 grade planned, sequential health education program.

State Assessment Requirement: None.

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Physical Education
     Last Updated: 11/9/2010

Mandate: Not specifically required.

Exemptions: None specified.

Curriculum Content: The Comprehensive Health and Physical Education Standards (2009) provides standards and a suggested curriculum framework for physical education. 

Physical Fitness Assessment: None.

Asthma Awareness Education
     Last Updated: 1/2/2006

Not specifically required.

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Emotional, Social, and Mental Health Education
     Last Updated: 10/25/2011

Statute 22-25-104 (2000) encourages districts to voluntarily provide a pre K-12 grade planned, sequential health education program that provides mental, social, and emotional health education. The Comprehensive Health and Physical Education Standards (2009) includes standards for social and emotional wellness.

Character Education: Statute 22-29-103 (2001) recommends school districts adopt character education programs that develop an upright, moral, and desirable citizenry and better prepares students to become positive contributors to society.

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HIV, STD, and Pregnancy Prevention Education
     Last Updated: 11/9/2010

Mandate: Colorado does not require students to receive instruction on HIV, STD, or pregnancy prevention education, although the Colorado Comprehensive Health Education Act (2000) encourages school districts to teach about communicably transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS/STDs and Statute 25-4-1405 (1997) for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment states, school districts are urged to provide every secondary school student, with parental consent, education on HIV infection and AIDS and its prevention."

Curriculum Content: Statute 22-1-110.5 (2007) requires school districts that offer a planned curriculum concerning human sexuality  accurate and based on scientific research.  The curriculum must fulfill the following requirements:  (1) Encourage parental involvement and communication, (2) Emphasize abstinence (as defined in the statute) and teach that it is the only certain way to avoid pregnancy, STDs, (3) Include instruction on the link between HPV and cancer and the availability of the HPV vaccine, (4) Include instruction on making responsible decisions, boundary setting, peer pressure and the influence of alcohol on healthy decision making, and (5) Provide instruction about the benefits, side effects and availability of contraceptives and barrier methods, including instruction regarding emergency contraception.  School districts receiving direct or indirect federal funding for abstinence education are not required to adopt the content standards in any year such funding is received.

Statute 22-25-104 (2000) requires that any curriculum and materials developed and used in teaching sexuality and human reproduction shall include values and responsibility and shall give primary emphasis to abstinence by school aged children."

Parental Approval: Statute 22-25-104 requires that School officials shall receive prior written approval from a parent or guardian before his or her child may participate in any program discussing or teaching sexuality and human reproduction. Parents must receive, with the written permission slip, an overview of the topics and materials to be presented in the curriculum" (an opt-in" policy).  State education agency officials clarify that active parental consent is required only if the school district is using state funds to teach about sexuality (they note that the state is providing $600,000 for the Colorado Comprehensive Health Education Act, which may include communicable diseases). Notification to parents that a program is offered, and that parents have the right to see the curriculum and to request an exemption, is required for all districts regardless of funding (an opt-out" policy).

Statute 22-25-110 (1992) requires schools to establish a procedure to exempt a student, upon request of the parent or guardian of such student, from a specific portion of the health education program on the grounds that it is contrary to the religious beliefs and teachings of the student or the student's parent or guardian" (an opt-out" policy).

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Nutrition Education
     Last Updated: 2/18/2013

Not specifically required.

The Comprehensive Health and Physical Education Academic Standards (2009) include learning objectives around nutrition, a healthy diet and strategies for improving health in the area of nutrition.

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Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drug Use Education
     Last Updated: 5/13/2009

Alcohol: Statute 22-1-110 (1963) mandates instruction in alcohol and controlled substances. Statute 22-25-104 (2000) also encourages a voluntary comprehensive health education program, which may include alcohol use prevention.

Tobacco: Colorado does not require students to receive instruction on tobacco use prevention education. However, Statute 22-25-104 encourages a voluntary comprehensive health education program, which may include tobacco use prevention.

Drugs: Statute 22-1-110  mandates instruction in alcohol and controlled substances. Statute 22-25-104 (2000) also encourages a voluntary comprehensive health education program, which may include alcohol use prevention.

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Injury and Violence Prevention Education
     Last Updated: 5/13/2009

Colorado does not require students to receive instruction on violence prevention. However, Statute 22-25-104 (2000) encourages a voluntary comprehensive health education program, which may include violence prevention education.

Bullying/Harassment: Statute 22-32-109.1 (2005) requires district boards of education to adopt a specific policy concerning bullying education. This statute also encourages school districts to develop a comprehensive, age-appropriate curriculum that teaches safety in working and interacting on the internet", which addresses recognition and avoidance of on-line bullying".

Fighting/Gangs: Statute 22-25-104.5 (2000) creates a law-related education program within the Department of Education prevention initiatives unit , aimed at reducing the incidence of gangs in public schools through education. Districts are urged to implement age appropriate law-related educational programs to specifically address antisocial gang behavior. If implemented, such programs must meet certain topic requirements and guidelines stated within this statute. The Statute also urges districts to implement law-related educational programs, which may include instruction in mediation and conflict resolution. 

Suicide and Other Self-Abuse Prevention: Not specifically required.

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Staff
Requirements for All Educators Regarding Health Education
     Last Updated: 10/25/2011

Pre-service Requirement: The minimum requirement for prospective health teachers in elementary and middle grades prior to licensure is a bachelor's degree in the liberal arts, with additional coursework in health (not specified). The specific details of initial licensure are outlined in State Board of Education Regulations 2260.5-R-8.01 and 8.02 (2004). The minimum requirement for prospective health teachers in high school grades prior to licensure is a bachelor's degree in health, as outlined in State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-8.11 (2004).

Professional Development: Statute 22-25-104 (2000) states that the required guidelines for health education programs must include a plan to promote and provide the proper training of teachers and staff in health education. Statute 22-25-104.5 (2000) encourages school districts to provide training for instructors and administrators in gang awareness and substance abuse resistance education.

For an initial license holder, State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-12.01 (2004) requires steps towards completing the requirements for a professional license every 3 years until completed. State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-12.02 (2004) requires six semester hours or 90 clock hours of professional development every five years for professional license renewal.

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Requirements for Health Educators
     Last Updated: 8/31/2009

Pre-service Requirement: The minimum requirement for prospective health teachers in elementary and middle grades prior to licensure is a bachelor's degree in the liberal arts, with additional coursework in health (not specified). The specific details of initial licensure are outlined in State Board of Education Regulations 2260.5-R-8.01 and 8.02 (2004). The minimum requirement for prospective health teachers in high school grades prior to licensure is a bachelor's degree in health, as outlined in State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-8.11 (2004).

Professional Development: Statute 22-25-104 (2000) states that the required guidelines for health education programs must include a plan to promote and provide the proper training of teachers and staff in health education. Statute 22-25-104.5 (2000) encourages school districts to provide training for instructors and administrators in gang awareness and substance abuse resistance education.

For an initial license holder, State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-12.01 (2004) requires steps towards completing the requirements for a professional license every 3 years until completed. State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-12.02 (2004) requires six semester hours or 90 clock hours of professional development every five years for professional license renewal.

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Requirements for Physical Educators
     Last Updated: 8/31/2009

Pre-service Requirement: Prospective elementary and middle school teachers are required to have a minimum of a bachelor's degree in the liberal arts, with additional coursework in physical education. The specific details of initial licensure are outlined in State Board of Education Regulations 2260.5-R-8.01 and 8.02 (2004). High school physical education teachers are required to have a bachelor's degree in physical education, as outlined in State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-8.16 (2004).

Professional Development: For an initial license holder, State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-12.01 (2004) requires steps towards completing the requirements for a professional license every 3 years until completed. State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-12.02 (2004) requires six semester hours of 90 clock hours of professional development every five years for professional license renewal.

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Requirements for School Nurses
     Last Updated: 11/9/2010

Pre-service Requirement: Statute 12-38-111 (2003) requires the completion of an approved nursing education program, a bachelor's degree, and the passing of a board-approved examination for licensure as a professional nurse. For school nurses to obtain a special services license as a school nurse, they must have a valid Colorado RN license and a baccalaureate degree in nursing. If their baccalaureate degree is not in nursing, they must have 3 years school nurse experience and pass the National School Nurse Certification exam.

Professional Development: For an initial license holder, State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-12.01 (2004) requires steps towards completing the requirements for a professional license every 3 years until completed. State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-12.02 (2004) requires six semester hours of 90 clock hours of professional development every five years for professional license renewal.

Student-to-Nurse Ratio: None specified.

Requirements for Non-Certified Personnel to Administer Medication
     Last Updated: 4/29/2012

Pre-service Requirement: Statute 12-38-132 (2003) allows any registered nurse to delegate any task included in the practice of professional nursing".

Professional Development: Medication Administration in the Schools (2010) recommends unlicensed personnel complete a state-approved medication-training course.

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Requirements for School Counselors
     Last Updated: 10/25/2011

Pre-service Requirement : Per Statute 22-60.5-201 (2004) and State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-3.02 (2004), at least a initial special services license is required for to be a school counselor. State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-11.09 (2004) requires school counselors for ages 0-21 to have a master's degree in school counseling, completed an approved program in school counseling, passed a state-approved assessment in school counseling, and completed a 600-hour supervised internship in a school setting at the appropriate age level(s). The candidate must also demonstrate knowledge in 10 specified competencies.   

Professional Development: For an initial license holder, State Board of Education 2260.5-R-12.01 (2004) requires steps towards completing the requirements for a professional license every 3 years until completed. State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-12.02 (2004) requires six semester hours of 90 clock hours of professional development every five years for professional license renewal.

Student-to-Counselor Ratio: None specified.

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Requirements for School Psychologists
     Last Updated: 8/31/2009

Pre-service Requirement: Per Statute 22-60.5-201 (2004) and State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-3.02 (2004), at least an initial special services license is required for to be a school psychologist serving ages 0-21. State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-11.06 (2004) requires the completion of a minimum of a six-year 60 graduate credit specialist program, passing the national school psychology examination, completion of supervised practica, completion of a 1200-hour supervised internship with 600 hours in a school setting, and a valid National Certified School Psychologist credential from the National School Psychology Certification Board. Applicants must also demonstrate knowledge and proficiency in eight specified areas.

Professional Development: For an initial license holder, State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-12.01 (2004) requires steps towards completing the requirements for a professional license every 3 years until completed. Regulation 2260.5-R-12.02 (2004) requires six semester hours of 90 clock hours of professional development every five years for professional license renewal.

Student-to-Psychologist Ratio: None specified.

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Requirements for School Social Workers
     Last Updated: 8/31/2009

Pre-service Requirement: Per Statute 22-60.5-201 (2004) and State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-3.02 (2004), at least an initial special services license is required for to be a school social worker. State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-11.07 (2004) requires a minimum of a master's degree in social work from an accepted institution of higher education, coursework in school and special education law. A candidate is also required to have either passed the National School Social Worker examination, passed the Colorado Assessment for Licensed Clinical Social Workers or Colorado State Board of Education-adopted assessment for school social worker, or completed a 900-hour supervised practicum in social work and have at least one field experience with school aged children. A school social worker must also demonstrate knowledge and proficiency in eight specified areas.

Professional Development: For an initial license holder, State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-12.01 (2004) requires steps towards completing the requirements for a professional license every 3 years until completed. State Board of Education Regulation 2260.5-R-12.02 (2004) requires six semester hours of 90 clock hours of professional development every five years for professional license renewal.

Student-to-Social Worker Ratio: None specified.

Requirements for Food Service Personnel
     Last Updated: 7/14/2008

Pre-service Requirement: None specified.

Professional Development: None specified.

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Requirements for Athletic Coaches
     Last Updated: 7/19/2008

Pre-service Requirement: None specified.

Professional Development: None specified.

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Health Promoting Environment
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Wellness Policies
     Last Updated: 4/29/2012

Additional Accountability Requirements: None

Additional Content Requirements: None

Guidance Materials: The state Department of Education produced a policy guide entitled Local School Wellness Policy: A Step By Step Guide to Implementing P.L. 108-265, Section 204 and Colorado Senate Bill 05-081 (2005) that has an accompanying CD-ROM with resources on a variety of pertinent topics including nutrition, physical activity, sample policies from other organizations and states including NASBE's guidance on implementing and assessing wellness policies, and assessment tools including CDC's School Health Index.

The state Department of Education has also created a School Wellness Policy Implementation Assessment Tool, approved by the state Education Data Assessment Committee that measures the level of policy implementation. The results of the implementation assessments inform training and technical assistance for further aiding in the implementation of policies.

Other: Revised Statute 22-32-136 (2005) encourages district boards of education to adopt wellness policies.  HB 1224 (2008) encourages school districts to expand their local wellness policies to adopt goals for emphasizing healthy choices and lifestyles, including physical education (PE), nutrition, and mental health counseling. It also expands the Comprehensive Health Education Act to include local student wellness programs, allowing funding for local student wellness programs only if the school district has adopted an expanded wellness policy, and allowing funding for wellness programs that include PE only if every PE teacher is licensed in that field. HB 1224 (2008) also encourages local school districts to establish a local school wellness program that includes or is otherwise coordinated with health education.

The state Department of Education also collects and reviews local wellness policies for compliance to the basic federal requirements as part of the district Child Nutrition program review and collects information on the level of policy implementation. Districts complete a self-reported School Wellness Policy Implementation Assessment Tool, approved by the state Education Data Assessment Committee that measures the level of policy implementation.

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School Meals Program
     Last Updated: 8/4/2014

Food ServicesSB12-086 (2012) prohibits a public school or institute charter school from making available to a student a food item that contains any amount of industrially produced trans fat. The prohibition applies to all food and beverages made available to a student on school grounds during each school day and extended school day, including but not limited to a food or beverage item made available to a student in a school cafeteria, school
store, vending machine, or other food service entity existing upon school grounds or through any fundraising effort conducted by one or more students, teachers, or parents.

Adequate Time to Eat: Statute 22-32-136 (2005) also encourages local districts to adopt policies ensuring access to healthful food choices in appropriate portion sizes throughout the school day, and compliance with beverage restrictions adopted per SB 08-109 (2008). Statute 22-32-136 (2005) requires that students have "adequate time to eat."

School Breakfast: Statute 22-82.8 (2013) requires  every school with 70% or more students eligible for free or reduced-cost lunch during the prior school year to offer a free breakfast to each student in the school after the first bell. Individual schools may select a method and time to offer the breakfast, so long as it occurs after the first bell of the school day. Schools that do not participate in the national school lunch program are not required to participate. Schools with fewer than 100 students or a school within a district with less than 300 students are exempt.

Food Allergies: Statute 22-2-135 (2009) requires the State Board of Education to promulgate rules for the management of food allergies and anaphylaxis among students enrolled in public schools. The rules must include the following: (1) Reasonable accommodations for communication between schools and emergency medical services, (2)  Reasonable accommodations to reduce the risk of students' explosure to anaphylaxis-causing agents, (3) The provision of emergency anaphylaxis treatment training for appropriate staff, including self-injectable epinephrine, and (4) Procedures to ensure the availability of a student's self-injectable epinephrine to faculty and administrative staff in the event of an emergency. Statute 22-2-139 (2009) requires each school district board of education to adopt and implement a policy for the management of food allergies and anaphylaxis, in accordance with the rules established by the State Board of Education in Statute 22-2-135 (2009). Statute 22-30.5-518 (2009) requires the state charter school institute to adopt and implement a policy for the management of food allergies and anaphylaxis which at a minimum must satisfy the rules in 22-2-135 (2009) . Statute 22-2-135 (2009) requires each school district to provide notice to a parent or legal guardian of the school district's policy, including a form which parents or guardians may provide specific information about the student's history of allergy, symptoms, medication, emergency procedures and contact numbers, along with encouragement to parents to provide the school nurse or other administrator a supply of the prescribed medication.

Farm-to-School: SB81 (2010) creates the Farm-to-School Healthy Kids Act and establishes an interagency task force to develop farm-to-school program policies.

Statutes 22-82.5.101 through 108 (2006) establish a pilot fresh fruit and vegetable farm-to-school grant program for public schools. The program aims to increase the availability of locally grown fresh fruits and vegetables in school breakfast programs and throughout the school day. To the maximum extent possible, not less than seventy-five percent of participating students should be from school districts where not less than fifty percent of the enrolled students are eligible for free or reduced lunches.

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Competitive Foods in School
     Last Updated: 6/6/2014

SB12-086 (2012) prohibits a public school or institute charter school from making available to a student a food item that contains any amount of industrially produced trans fat. The prohibition applies to all food and
beverages made available to a student on school grounds during each school day and extended school day, including but not limited to a food or beverage item made available to a student in a school cafeteria, school
store, vending machine, or other food service entity existing upon school grounds or through any fundraising effort conducted by one or more students, teachers, or parents.

SB 08-109 (2008) requires each school district board of education to adopt and implement a policy that prohibits, except as described in the Bill, the sale of beverages to students from any source, including but not limited to school cafeterias, vending machines, school stores, and fund-raising activities conducted on school campuses.  The State Board of Education's Rules for the Administration of the Healthy Beverages Policy (2008) require beginning July 1, 2009, beverages sold to students on school grounds during the regular and extended school day shall, at a minimum, meet the following nutritional standards:

Elementary level:
  *  Bottled Water
  *  Up to 8 oz servings of fat-free or low-fat milk, or USDA approved nutritionall equivalent milk alternatives
  *  Up to 8 oz servings servings of fat-free or low-fat nutritionally equivalent flavored milk up to 150 calories/8 oz
  *  Up to 8 oz servings of 100% juice with no added sweetners and up to 120 calories/8 oz

Middle school level:
  *  Bottled Water
  *  Up to 10 oz servings of fat-free or low-fat milk, or USDA approved nutritionall equivalent milk alternatives
  *  Up to 10 oz servings servings of fat-free or low-fat nutritionally equivalent flavored milk up to 150 calories/8 oz
  *  Up to 10  oz servings of 100% juice with no added sweetners and up to 120 calories/8 oz

High school level:
At least 50% of non-milk beverages must be water and no or low calorie options
*   Bottled water
*  No or low calorie beverages with up to 10 calories/8 oz (i.e., diet sodas, unsweetened diet teas, low calorie 
    sport drinks, fitness waters, flavored waters, seltzers)
*  Up to 12 oz servings of fat free or low fat milk. Milk includes nutritionally equivalent milk alternatives (per USDA)
*  Up to 12 oz servings of fat free or low fat nutritionally equivalent flavored milk up to 150 calories / 8 ounces
*  Up to 12 ounce servings of 100% juice, with no added sweeteners and up to 120 calories / 8 ounces
*  Other drinks, up to 12 ounce servings with no more than 66 calories / 8 ounces

Statute 22-32-136 (2005) also encourages local districts to establish rules for when and where competitive foods may be sold on school property.

SB12-086 (2012) prohibits a public school or institute charter school from making available to a student a food item that contains any amount of industrially produced trans fat. The prohibition applies to all food and
beverages made available to a student on school grounds during each school day and extended school day, including but not limited to a food or beverage item made available to a student in a school cafeteria, school
store, vending machine, or other food service entity existing upon school grounds or through any fundraising effort conducted by one or more students, teachers, or parents.

State Board of Education Regulation 2202-R-203 (1998) prohibits the operation of competitive food or beverage services that is in competition with the district's food service program. Competitive food services must be closed 1/2 hour prior to and remain closed until 1/2 hour after the last regular scheduled school lunch and/or school breakfast period on the campus where school lunches and breakfasts are served. This restriction, however, may be waived for the competitive food service of mechanically-vended beverages offered to senior high school students outside of the meal service area. 

 

Fundraising Exemptions:
A June 5, 2014 memo (link not available) from Jane Brand, Director, Office of School Nutrition to School Nutrition Directors and Main Nutrition Contacts creates a policy, effective July 1, 2014, that will allow up to three exemptions per school building for school year 2014-2015. The duration of the fundraisers will be determined by the Local Educational Agencies. However, the duration must comply with the intent of the legislation to increase the consumption of healthy foods during the school day and create an environment that reinforces the development of healthy eating habits.
 

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Physical Activity Other Than Physical Education
     Last Updated: 10/11/2011

General Physical Activity Requirement: HB 11-1069 (2011) requires each school district board of education to adopt a policy that incorporates a minimum number of minutes of physical activity each month, or each day if the school meets less than 5 days per week, into each elementary school student's schedule. The requirement for students who attend 5 days per week for a full day is 600 minutes per month. The state charter school institute must ensure that each institute charter school, working with its school accountability committee, adopts and implements a physical activity policy that complies with the minimum requirements for a school district policy. If a school currently provides more than the minimum required minutes of physical activity, it cannot reduce the number of minutes except for budgetary reasons. A school cannot substitute noninstructional physical activity for standards-based physical education instruction.

Recess or Physical Activity Breaks: No state policy recommending or requiring recess.

Recess Before Lunch: The School Site Resource Kit: Implementation Guide for the Colorado Physical Activity and Nutrition State Plan (2010) recommends that schools implement recess before lunch.

Walking/Biking to School: Statute 43-1-1601 (2004) requires the Department of Transportation to establish and administer a Safe Routes to School program to distribute federal funds to improve pedestrian and bicyclist safety in school areas. Grants may address various construction issues, installation of crossings and signs, traffic-calming and diversion measures, and educational programs. Criteria for awarding grants includes the potential of the project to encourage walking and bicycling among students and the identification and improvement of existing and potential walking and bicycling routes.

Organized Sports
     Last Updated: 5/12/2011

Interscholastic Athletics: No state policy.

Concussion and Sports-Related Head Injury: Code 25-43-103 requires each public and private middle and high school to require each coach of a youth athletic activity that involves interscholastic play to complete an annual concussion recognition education course. It also requires each private club or public recreation facility and athletic league that sponsors youth athletic activities to require each volunteer coach to complete an annual concussion recognition course. The requirements of the course are outlined in the statute. If a coach who is required to complete concussion recognition education suspects that a youth athlete has sustained a concussion following an observed or suspected blow to the head or body in a game, competition or practice, the coach must immediately remove the athlete from the game. Once removed from play, a parent or guardian must be notified and the athlete may not return to play or participate in any supervised team activities until they are evaluated by a health care provider and receives written clearance.

Automated External Defibrillator (AED): Code 22-2-125 (2005) encourages each school district to acquire an AED for placement in each public school and each athletic facility maintained by a school district at a location separate from the public school. It also provides for immunity from liability for any civil damages in relation to an act or failure to act in relation to the AED, unless the acts are grossly negligent or willful and wanton.

Safe and Drug-Free Schools
     Last Updated: 10/25/2011

Statute 22-32-109.1 (2006)requires district boards to adopt and implement a safe school plan. It also requires the principal of each public school to provide a written report to the board of education specifying the number of conduct and code violations. The categories of violations are outlined in the statute.

Fighting/Gangs: Statute 22-32-109.1 (2006) requires district boards of education to adopt policies concerning gang-related activities in the school, on school property, in school vehicles, and at school activities or sanctioned events. This statute also requires district boards of education to adopt policies and procedures for dealing with students who cause disruption in the classroom, on school grounds, in school vehicles, or at school activities or sanctioned events. These policies must also allow teacher to remove such students from their classroom. A third offense results in removal from the class for the remainder of the term of the class. Policies and procedures for use of reasonable and appropriate acts of physical intervention for dealing with disruptive students are also required.

Weapons: Statute 22-32-109.1 requires district boards of education to adopt policies prohibiting students from bringing dangerous weapons to school, on school grounds, in school vehicles, or to school activities or sponsored events.

Drugs and Alcohol: Statute 22-32-109.1 requires district boards of education to adopt policies prohibiting students from brining drugs or other controlled substances to school, on school grounds, in school vehicles, or to school activities or sanctioned events and from using drugs and other controlled substances on school grounds, in school vehicles, or at school activities or sanctioned events.

Collaboration with Law Enforcement: Statute 22-32-109.1 requires district boards of education to cooperate and develop written agreements with law enforcement officials, the juvenile justice system, and social services. This statute also recommends school districts work with local law enforcement in developing internet safety curriculum.

Bullying, Harassment and Hazing
     Last Updated: 3/28/2012

Bullying/Harassment: Code 22-32-109.1 (2011) defines and prohibits bullying and requires district boards of education to adopt and implement a safe school plan. The plan must include a conduct and discipline code, which must include a dress code and a policy concerning bullying prevention and education. The policy must incorporate the biennial survey of students’ impressions of the severity of bullying in their school, character building, and the identification of a team at the school to advise the administration on the severity and frequency of bullying. Each policy must establish disciplinary consequences for those students who bully others and those who take retaliatory actions against a student who reports an incident. The statute also requires each public school to annually submit a written report concerning the learning environment in the school. A compilation of the report must be submitted to the department of education. Requirements of the report are outlined in the statute.

Code 22-93-102 through 22-93-105 (2011) creates a school bullying prevention and education grant program in the Department of Education. Schools may apply for grants to reduce the frequency of bullying incidents. The Department must report to the State Board of Education on the process and outcomes of the grant program. The awarded schools may use the grant monies for bullying prevention, awareness and policymaking activities that are outlined in the statute. It establishes funding for the program and requires the State Board of Education to promulgate rules for the grant program. Guidance for these rules is outlined in the statute. It also requires the Department of Education to biennially administer a survey of students regarding the severity of bullying in their schools. Requirements for the survey are outlined in the statute. As a part of this survey, each school must designate a team of persons to advise the school administration concerning the severity and frequency of bullying incidents that occur in the school.

Code 22-93-106 requires the Department of Education to create a page on its public website where it makes available evidence-based best practices and other resources for educators and professionals engaged in bullying prevention and education.

Code 22-30.5-116 requires charter schools to adopt and implement a policy regarding bullying prevention and education. The requirements of the policy are outlined in the statute. Code 20-30.5-505 requires the charter school institute to adopt and implement a policy regarding bullying prevention and education. Code 22-30.5-521 requires each charter school to implement the policy of the institute.  

Cyberbullying: Code 22-32-109.1 (2011) defines and prohibits bullying and requires district boards of education to adopt and implement a safe school plan. The definition of bullying includes an electronic act, or a pattern thereof, that is intended to coerce, intimidate or cause any physical, mental or emotional harm to any student

Hazing: Statute 18-9-124 makes it unlawful for any person to engage in hazing."Hazing" means any activity by which a person recklessly endangers the health or safety of or causes a risk of bodily injury to an individual for purposes of initiation or admission into or affiliation with any student organization.

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Crisis Management/Emergency Response
     Last Updated: 11/9/2010

Response and Management Plans: Statute 22-32-109.1 (2008) requires district boards of education to adopt the national response framework released by the federal department of homeland security and NIMS formally through orders or resolutions.  This includes incorporating the Incident Command System into school response plans and working closely with community first responders in ongoing training and exercising of written response plans.

Reporting Incidents of Violence: Statute 22-32-109.1 (2008) requires district boards of education to adopt policies whereby the principal of each public school must annually report to the district board of education information pertaining to the learning environment in the school for that year, including the number of violations of the conduct and discipline code.

Tobacco Use
     Last Updated: 8/11/2008
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Statute 25-14-103.5 (1998) mandates each school district to adopt policies and rules prohibiting the use of all tobacco products by students, teachers, staff, and visitors on all school property which includes school grounds and school transportation vehicles. Signs are to be prominently posted on all school property.

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Air Quality
     Last Updated: 1/2/2006
No state policy.
Pesticide Use
     Last Updated: 1/2/2006
No state policy.
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Playground/Facility Safety
     Last Updated: 1/2/2006

No state policy.

Shared Use Agreements
     Last Updated: 4/14/2013

Statute 22-32-118 (2012) authorizes local boards of education to establish and maintain programs, including recreational services like playgrounds, paid for by school district moneys or charged through a fee or tuition. Local boards of education may cooperate with any unit of local government, quasi-governmental agency, institution of higher education, or civic organization in offering year-round use of facilities and school personnel for off-hours recreational activities for children, youth, and adults.

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Student Services
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Screening for Health Conditions
     Last Updated: 6/25/2010

Vision and Hearing: Statute 22-1-116 (1981) requires all children in grades K-3, 5, 7, and 9 grades be referred for vision and hearing testing.

Chronic Health Conditions: No state policy.

Body Mass Index (BMI) Screening: No state policy.

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Administration of Medications
     Last Updated: 4/29/2012

Staff Administration: Colorado provides guidelines for administration of medication for school districts to follow.

Statute 22-2-135 (2009) requires the State Board of Education to promulgate rules for the management of food allergies and anaphylaxis among students enrolled in public schools. The rules must include the provision of emergency anaphylaxis treatment training for appropriate staff, including self-injectable epinephrine. Statute 22-2-139 (2009) requires each school district board of education to adopt and implement a policy for the management of food allergies and anaphylaxis, in accordance with the rules established by the State Board of Education in Statute 22-2-135 (2009). Statute 22-30.5-518 (2009) requires the state charter school institute to adopt and implement a policy for the management of food allergies and anaphylaxis which at a minimum must satisfy the rules in 22-2-135 (2009) . 

Self-Administration of Asthma Medication:  Statute 22-1-119.5 (2005) allows for a student with asthma to possess and administer medication if the student has a treatment plan approved.This statute requires a prescription from health care practitioner for use during school hours, school-sponsored activities, and while in transit to or from school or school sponsored activities, and that the student have the necessary skill level and be instructed in the proper use of the medication. The school nurse and health care practitioner are required to collaborate to formulate a written treatment plan, renewed annually in the case of a public school, and the student's parent or legal guardian must complete and submit to the public or nonpublic school the required documentation, including written medical authorization, a waiver of liability, and a written contract between the school nurse, the student, and the parent or guardian assigning level of responsibility to the parent or guardian, student, and school employees.

Self-Administration of Anaphylaxis Medication: Statute 22-1-119.5 (2005) allows a student with severe allergies to possess and self-administer medication to treat anaphylaxis if the student has a treatment plan approved. This statute requires that the medication be prescribed by a health care practitioner for use during school hours, school-sponsored activities, and while in transit to or from school or school sponsored activities, and that the student have the necessary skill level and be instructed in the proper use of the medication.

The school nurse and health care practitioner must also collaborate to formulate a written treatment plan, renewed annually in the case of a public school, and the student's parent or legal guardian must complete and submit to the public or nonpublic school the required documentation, including written medical authorization, a waiver of liability, and a written contract between the school nurse, the student, and the parent or guardian assigning level of responsibility to the parent or guardian, student, and school employees.

Psychotropic Medications: Statute 22-32-109 (2003) requires the board of education to adopt a policy to prohibit school personnel from recommending or requiring the use of a psychotropic drug for any student".

Storage and Record-keeping: Medication Administration in the Schools states that "school health personnel should maintain accurate individualized daily records of medications administered, any special circumstances related to the procedure, and the student's unusual reactions or responses. A separate medication log must be kept for each student. This log becomes a permanent record and provides legal protection to those who administer medications in schools". All medications should be locked and stored in drawers, refrigerators, or cabinets for that purpose. Emergency medications should be stored in a secure area inaccessible to children. The medication must be immediately available to personnel at all times students are present.

Statute 22-1-119.5 (2005) allows schools, with the approval of a parent or legal guardian with a student an approved treatment plan, to maintain additional asthma or anaphylaxis medications in a location where the student must have immediate access in the event of an asthma or anaphylaxis emergency.

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Counseling and Mental Health Services
     Last Updated: 5/13/2009

Requirement to Provide Services: No state policy: Only required for an IEP.

Identification of Students with Mental or Emotional Disorders: Statute 22-32-110 (2003) allows the local board of education to require teachers to report to the principal any observed mental, moral, or physical defectiveness of a student under their care.

Substance Abuse: No state policy: Only required for an IEP.

Suicide Prevention: No state policy: Only required for an IEP.

HIV, STD, and Pregnancy Testing and Counseling: No state policy: Only required for an IEP.

Immunity of Liability: No state policy.

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Immunization
     Last Updated: 8/19/2010

Detailed, current information about immunization requirements by state is maintained by the National Network for Immunization Information.  Select your state from the drop down box under Search for State Vaccine Requirements for School Entry."

ExemptionsStatute 25-4-903 (1977) allows exemption from immunization requirements under the following circumstances: (1) Submission of certification from a licensed physician that the physical condition of the student is such that one or more immunizations would be life-endangering or medically contraindicated, or (2) Submission of a statement of exemption signed by one parent, an emancipated student or a student 18 years or older that the parent, guardian or student is an adherent to a religious belief whose teachings are opposed to immunizations or that they hold a belief that is opposed to immunizations.  In addition, the state board of health may provide, by regulation, further exemptions to immunization based upon sound medical practice.

Statute 25-4-908 (1977) states that in the case of danger of epidemic from any of the communicable diseases for which an immunization is required, no exemption or exception from immunization against such disease shall be recognized.  In this case, quarantine is authorized as a legal alternative to immunization.

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Accommodation
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Staff with HIV
     Last Updated: 1/2/2006
No state policy.
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Students with HIV
     Last Updated: 1/2/2006
No state policy.
Pregnant or Parenting Students
     Last Updated: 1/2/2006
No state policy.
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Individual Health Plan for Students
     Last Updated: 1/2/2006
No state policy.
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Coordination/ Implementation
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Coordinating or Advisory Councils
     Last Updated: 8/14/2008

State-level: No state policy.

Local-level: The state does not mandate the formation of a school health coordinating or advisory council, nor does it require schools or districts to do so. However, the Colorado Comprehensive Health Education Act encourages school districts to establish a local health advisory council that is representative of the community's norms and values.

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School Health Program Coordinators
     Last Updated: 8/18/2008

State-level: No state policy.

Local-level: No state policy.

Confidentiality
     Last Updated: 8/18/2008

Student Health-Related Records: No state policy.

Student Health-Related Services: No state policy.

Limitations on Student Surveys
     Last Updated: 5/13/2009

Statute 22-1-123 (2000) states that, A school or school district employee who requires participation in a survey, analysis, or evaluation in  a public school's curriculum or other official school activity shall obtain the written consent of a student's parent or legal guardian prior to the student being given any survey, analysis, or evaluation intended to reveal information, whether the information is personally identifiable or not, concerning the student or the student's parent's or legal guardian's". Such subjects include, but are not limited to, political affiliations, potentially embarrassing mental and psychological conditions, sexual behavior and attitudes, and illegal, anti-social, self-incriminating, or demeaning behavior.

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