check
Emotional, Social, and Mental Health Education

Alaska

Last Updated: 1/5/2009

Not specifically required.

Character Education: Not specifically required. However Statute 14.33.200(b)  requires districts to adopt a policy that prohibits the harassment, intimidation, or bullying of any student. The policy must emphasize positive character traits and values, including the importance of civil and respectful speech and conduct, and the responsibility of students to comply with the district's policy prohibiting harassment, intimidation, or bullying.


Alabama

Last Updated: 12/8/2010

The Alabama Course of Study: Health Education (2009) sets the minimum content standard for teaching students the ability to effectively deal with psychological challenges of life, take responsibility for personal behaviors, and feel comfortable with one's emotions at each grade level. More specifically, students are to receive instruction on how to identify symptoms, methods of treatment, and ways to manage mental illnesses or disorders, such as depression, eating disorders, and suicide in grades 9-12.

Character Education: According to Appendix B of the Alabama Course of Study: Health Education (2009), students in all grades are required to receive not less than 10 minutes of instruction per day focusing on the students' development of character traits, including courage, citizenship, honesty, self-control, etc. Code 16-6B-2 (1975) requires the State Board and all local boards to develop and implement a comprehensive character education program for all grades.


Arkansas

Last Updated: 11/17/2013

The K-8 Physical Education and Health Curriculum Framework and Health and Wellness Curriculum for grades 9-12 (2011) includes requirements for students to develop responsible personal and social behaviors, with skills to enhance relationships and promote wellness, and skills to manage emotional and mental health. Code 6-15-1505 (2003) further requires local districts to align each class and subject area according to the curriculum framework adopted by the state board of education.

Character Education
:
No state policy.


Arizona

Last Updated: 4/28/2012

The Health Education Standards (2009) sets forth required content areas to be taught to students in grades K-12, but the state does not recommend or require any specific curricula.  Students in grades 3-5 are to be taught how to identify indicators of mental, emotional, social, and physical health during childhood. Students in grades 6-12 are to be taught the interrelationship of mental/psychological, emotional, social, and physical health. 

Character Education: ARS 15-719 (no date available) allows each school district to provide instruction in character development in grades K-12. The Statute prescribes a minimum course of study. ARS 15-154.01 (no date available) allows any public school that teaches character education to be eligible for a state matching grant up to $1500 annually. The school is then responsible to match the dollars from any lawful source. The Statute provides a detailed list of curriculum elements.


California

Last Updated: 2/16/2009

Education Code 51890 (2003) strongly endorses students in grades K-12 receiving instruction in mental and emotional health and development.

Character Education: Not specifically required.


Colorado

Last Updated: 10/25/2011

Statute 22-25-104 (2000) encourages districts to voluntarily provide a pre K-12 grade planned, sequential health education program that provides mental, social, and emotional health education. The Comprehensive Health and Physical Education Standards (2009) includes standards for social and emotional wellness.

Character Education: Statute 22-29-103 (2001) recommends school districts adopt character education programs that develop an upright, moral, and desirable citizenry and better prepares students to become positive contributors to society.


Connecticut

Last Updated: 10/25/2011

Statute Chapter 164 Sec. 10-16bHealthy and Balanced Living Curriculum Framework (2006) further recommends that students in grades K-12 learn accurate information about their physical development, including mental and emotional health. In addition, The Connecticut Comprehensive School Counseling Guide (2008) outlines content standards and student competencies in the personal/social domain that promotes psychosocial development that includes evidence-based education, prevention and intervention services designed to address mental health and emotional issues to remove barriers to student success.

Chapter 169 Sec. 10-203a of the Connecticut General Statutes, directed the Connecticut State Department of Education to develop The Guidelines for a Coordinated Approach to School Health. The statute recommends that each local and regional board of education establish a comprehensive and coordinated plan to address the physical health needs of students based on these guidelines. These Guidelines also include information on social, emotional and mental health issues. 

Character Education: No state policy.


District of Columbia

Last Updated: 4/21/2013

Rule 5-E2304 (1994) requires public schools to provide health instruction within a planned, sequential, pre K-12 comprehensive school health education curriculum that includes the physical, mental, emotional and social dimensions of health and well-being.  Comprehensive school health education shall be defined as age appropriate instruction that improves the knowledge, skills, and behaviors of students so they choose a health enhancing lifestyle and avoid behaviors that may jeopardize their immediate long term health status.  Eleven content areas, including “coping with life situations”, are identified.


Delaware

Last Updated: 1/11/2010

Per Administrative Codes 14:501 (2004)and 14:851 (2009), Delaware requires students in grades K-12 to receive emotional, social, and mental health education as specified in the Delaware Recommended Curriculum for Health Education. The framework requires that elementary students learn the social and mental health benefits of physical activity and emotional health strategies such as self-image, stress management, and the healthy expression of emotions. Middle School students are to learn the social and mental health benefits of physical activity, the emotional and social changes associated with puberty, the effect emotions can have on food choices, and emotional health strategies such as self-image, stress management, healthy expression of emotions, advocating for positive social environments, and how to identify and seek help for mental health problems. High school students are to learn emotional health strategies such as self-image, stress management, healthy expression of emotions, and how to identify and seek help for mental health problems.

Character Education: Not specifically required.


Florida

Last Updated: 12/1/2010

Statute 1003.42 (2010) requires each district school board to provide all courses required for high school graduation and appropriate instruction designed to ensure that students meet the adopted standards. It further requires that instructional staff of the public schools teach comprehensive health education that addresses various concepts including mental health.

Statute 1003.43 (2004) includes health education in the physical education requirement, which states: “One credit in physical education to include integration of health.” The Next Generation Sunshine State Standards for Health Education (2008) focus on the ten components of health education, one being mental and emotional health.

Character Education: Statute 1003.42 (2010) requires each public school to teach “a character-development program in the elementary schools, similar to Character First or Character Counts, which is secular in nature. The character-development program shall be required in kindergarten through grade 12. Each district school board shall develop or adopt a curriculum for the character-development program that shall be submitted to the department for approval. The character-development curriculum shall stress the qualities of patriotism; responsibility; citizenship; kindness; respect for authority, life, liberty, and personal property; honesty; charity; self-control; racial, ethnic, and religious tolerance; and cooperation.”


Georgia

Last Updated: 8/25/2009

State Board of Education Rule 160-4-2-.12 (2000) requires local boards of education to develop and implement a comprehensive health program which includes mental health education in grades K-12. The Quality Core Curriculum Standards and Resources suggest lessons plans and resources to use in the classroom, including stress management, mental health issues, and self-management of actions and emotions.

Character Education: State Board of Education Rule 160-4-2-.33 (1997) requires local boards of education, per Georgia Code 20-2-145 (no date available), to adopt a plan for implementing values and character education, specifying instructional materials and strategies for all grade levels.


Hawaii

Last Updated: 8/25/2009

The Content and Performance Standards for Health (2005), while not requiring specific curricula, does set standards. Standard 3 recommends students in grades K-12 learn health-enhancing personal coping and stress management strategies

Character Education: State Board of Education Policy 2109 (2005) requires character education to be incorporated into the curriculum for all grades modeled by moral leadership from school administrators, teachers, and students.


Iowa

Last Updated: 11/22/2010

Mandate: 281 IAC 12.5 requires students in grades 1-12 be taught, as part of the overall health curriculum, emotional and social health, stress management, interpersonal relationships, and self-esteem. Kindergarten students are to be exposed to experiences that promote the healthy development of emotional and social habits. Code 256.11 (2009) requires every student to complete a course in cardiopulmonary resuscitation by the end of twelfth grade. Students may be exempted from the requirement if a parent or guardian files a written statement stating a conflict with the student's religious beliefs.

Character Education: Code 256.18 (2009) requires schools to make every effort, formally and informally, to promote character qualities that promote a safe and orderly living environment and equip students to become model citizens. The Department of Education is to assist schools in accessing curricula and funds to meet this requirement.


Idaho

Last Updated: 2/25/2013

State Board of Education and the Idaho State Legislature adopted the Idaho Health Education Standards (2010), mental and social wellness are included in the core concepts to be taught to students in grades K-12. Mental, emotional and social well-being are foundations for building good health. These foundations include a sense of security, identity, belonging, purpose and competence in order to strive toward a healthy and productive life. Knowledge and skills may include emotional intelligence, suicide prevention, stress management, communication skills, conflict resolution, and mental illness.

Character Education: Idaho has no specific policy requiring character education; however, Statute 33-1612 requires public schools to instill certain basic values, such as honesty and unselfishness, in students.


Illinois

Last Updated: 9/2/2009

105 ILCS 110/3 (2006) and State Board of Education 23 Illinois Administrative Code Ch. 1, Section 420 requires comprehensive health education programs to include as a basis for curricula in elementary and secondary schools emotional, psychological, physiological, hygienic, and social responsibilities of family life. Grades 6-12 are to receive instruction in mental health and illness.

Goal 23 of the Illinois Learning Standards for Physical Development and Health recommends early high school aged students learn the immediate and long-term effects of health habits on the body system, including stress management and emotional health. Middle and junior high aged student should receive instruction in the relationship among physical, mental, and social health factors.

Per the Illinois Children's Mental Health Act (2003), the State Board of Education has developed Social and Emotional Development Standards as part of the Illinois Learning Standards for the purpose of enhancing and measuring children's school readiness and ability to achieve academic success.

 

Character Education: ICLS 105/5 27-12 (2005) requires teachers to teach students "respect, responsibility, fairness, caring, trustworthiness, and citizenship, in order to raise pupils' honesty, kindness, justice, discipline, respect for others, and moral courage" to lessen crimes and raise the standard of good character.


Indiana

Last Updated: 11/30/2010

 The Indiana Academic Standards for Health Education (2007) recommends minimum health curricula standards and benchmarks for mental, social, and emotional education. Standard 1 recommends students in grades K-10 be taught how to identify aspects of emotional, social, and mental health. Standard 1 also recommends teaching students about the effects of, the interrelation between, and how environments affect physical, social, mental, and emotional health in grades K-10. Standard 3 recommends students be taught coping strategies for handling strong emotions like anger, grief, and anxiety and stress management in grades K-10. Standard 5 recommends students in grades K-9 be taught healthy expression of feelings.

Character Education: Code 20-30-5-5 (2005) requires morals instruction for public and non-public students in grades 1-12. Emphasis shall be placed on subjects such as morality, obedience to the law, courtesy, respect, and honesty.


Kansas

Last Updated: 9/14/2010

Kansas does not specifically require emotional, social and mental health education to be taught in schools.  Mental and emotional health" is one of the content areas for the health education standards outlined by the Kansas Model Curricular Standards for Health Education (2007). 

Character Education: No state policy.


Kentucky

Last Updated: 5/19/2013

The Kentucky Core Academic Standards (2010) require that mental wellness and individual well-being be taught in grades K-12 as part of the general health curriculum. Primary students are required to be taught about the various types of emotions and how to express them appropriately. Students in grades 4 and 6-7 are required to learn how to recognize the physical, emotional, and social changes associated with growth and development. Students in grades 4-6 & 8-12 must be taught about stress and stress management skills. Students in grades 6-8 must be taught social coping skills, including how to handle peer pressure. Students in grades 7-12 must be taught the symptoms and nature of mental illness. Students in grades 7 & 9-12 must be taught the causes and effects of emotional disorders. Students in grade 8 must be taught about health habits and behaviors that affect emotional wellness.

Expectation 2.32 of
Kentucky's Learning Goals & Academic Expectations (2004) also requires students in grades K-12 to learn strategies for remaining mentally and emotionally healthy. Sample activities and demonstrators are specified in the goals.

Character Education: KRS 156.095
requires that professional development programs shall be made available to teachers to improve instruction in the public schools, and shall include instruction in incorporating character education throughout the curriculum.


Louisiana

Last Updated: 9/2/2009

The Health Education Content Standards (Louisiana State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education ) (2002) require students to receive instruction in emotional, social, and mental health in grades K-12. Standard 1 specifically requires students to: explain how social and emotional personal environments affect personal health in grades K-4; describe relationships among physical, mental, emotional and social health in grades 5-8; and describe the interrelationships of mental, emotional, social, and physical health throughout the life span in grades 9-12. Standard 2 requires students in grades 9-12 to examine mental, social, and physical conditions requiring professional health services. Standard 3 requires instruction and application in stress management in grades K-4 and 9-12. Standard 5 requires students to learn healthy ways of communicating needs, wants, and feelings in grades K-12. Details of the Content Standards are provided in Bulletin 103 (2003).

Character Education: RS 17:282.2 (1998) states that any city or parish school system may offer character education curriculum that focuses on the development of character-traits such as honesty, fairness, respect for self and others in grades K-12.


Massachusetts

Last Updated: 7/19/2009

General Law 71.1 requires school health instruction to include emotional development. Standard 5 of the Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Curriculum Framework (1999) recommends specific topics to be taught in emotional, social, and mental health education by the end of 5th, 8th, and 12th grade. These include social awareness as it relates to attitudes and behaviors, identifying feelings and emotions and exploring how their effect on others, stress management, and developing a positive sense of self. 

Character Education: The Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Curriculum Framework (1999) recommends students be taught how to identify character traits such as honesty, trustworthiness, self-discipline, respectfulness, and kindness by grade 5.


Maryland

Last Updated: 12/28/2011

State Board of Education Regulation 13A.04.18.01 requires mental and emotional health education as a part of the comprehensive health education.

Character Education: Not specifically required.


Maine

Last Updated: 6/3/2013

Education Rule Chapter 127 (2002) includes in its standards and expectations for students to receive instruction on mental and emotional health at the elementary, middle, and high school levels.

Education Rule Chapter 132 (2007) requires mental, emotional, and social health standards be taught to students through the health education and physical education standards. These content areas are embedded throughout these standards PreK-12.

Education Rule Chapter 125 (2002) requires that school's Comprehensive Guidance Programs include a structured classroom program to meet the required content standards of the system of Learning Results.

Character Education
: Education Rule Chapter 127 requires Instruction in ethical and responsible behavior [to] be part of the educational program of each student.

Michigan

Last Updated: 12/19/2012

The Critical Health Problems Act, MCL 388.382 (1969), requires all schools to implement a systematic and integrated program to educate youth with regard to critical health problems including mental health.

Michigan's Health Education Content Standards and Benchmarks (1998), K-8 Grade Level Content Expectations (GLCE) (2007) and High School Merit Credit Guidelines (2007) recommend minimum content standards for teaching students to identify indicators and know the interrelationship of mental, emotional, social, intellectual, and physical health. It also teaches stress management, effective interpersonal communication, and other social skills that enhance health in grades K-12. The Policy on Comprehensive School Health Education (2004) recommends that each school adopt, implement, and evaluate a research-based, theory driven curriculum focused on helping young people develop and practice personal and social skills in grades preK-12. The Michigan Model for Comprehensive School Health Education includes lessons on emotional and mental health.  The State Board Policy on Integrating Mental Health in Schools (2010) recommends that each school implement a research-based curriculum such as the Michigan Model for Health.

Character Education: The Policy on Quality Character Education (2004) recommends that schools adopt secular character education programs to teach fairness, trustworthiness, citizenship, and self-restraint in order to help students learn and foster the well being of democratic society. The Michigan Model for Comprehensive School Health Education includes lessons on emotional and mental health.


Minnesota

Last Updated: 5/14/2008

Statute 120B.021 (2005) requires health and physical education. In addition, Statute 120B.22 requires violence education be comprehensive, accurate, and age appropriate curriculum and include nonviolent conflict resolution, sexual, racial, and cultural harassment, self-protection, and student hazing that promotes equality, respect, understanding, effective communication, individual responsibility, thoughtful decision making, positive conflict resolution, useful coping skills critical thinking, listening and watching skills, and personal safety. In particular, school districts are to target early adolescents whose personal circumstances may lead to violent or harassing behavior.

Character Education: Statute 120B.232 (2005) encourages districts to make character development education to be offered as a class or integrated into other instruction as a part of establishing a positive school climate that promotes attentiveness, truthfulness, respect for authority, diligence, gratefulness, self-discipline, patience, forgiveness, respect for others, peacemaking, and resourcefulness. Federal funds are to be used first to the extent they are available.


Missouri

Last Updated: 7/20/2009

The Missouri Violence Prevention Curriculum Framework (2008) recommends that anger management be taught in schools.

Character Education: The  Missouri Violence Prevention Curriculum Framework (2008) recommends that character education be taught in schools; especially focusing on responsibility and respect.


Mississippi

Last Updated: 9/9/2009

The Comprehensive Health Framework (2006) provides guidelines for health teachers to include instruction in mental health for grades K-12.

Character Education: Code 37-13-181 (1999) allows school districts to develop and implement a comprehensive character education program in grades K-12. State Board of Education Policy 1800 (1997) encourages each school district to ensure the inclusion of character education in all of the curriculum.


Montana

Last Updated: 12/19/2012

State Board of Public Education Administrative Rule 10.55.1301 (2001) requires schools to adopt a Health Enhancement (HE) Program, which combines the health and physical education disciplines to address the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual dimensions of a healthy lifestyle. State Board of Public Education Administrative Rule 10.55.1302 (1989) requires every student participate in these programs, and State Board of Education Administrative Rule 10.55.1003 (2003) requires HE Programs be provided at every grade level.

Benchmarks for HE Program Content 1 are set forth in State Board of Public Education Administrative Rules 10.54.7011 (1999) for the end of 4th grade, 10.54.7012 (1999) for the end of 8th grade, and 10.54.7013 (1999) upon graduation, which include stress management.

Character Education: Not specifically required.


North Carolina

Last Updated: 9/27/2010

Statute §115C-81 (2003) requires school health education to include mental and emotional health for grades K-9. Mental and Emotional Health is one of the "strands" of North Carolina’s Healthful Living Standard Course of Study (2006).  The course of study includes numerous goals and objectives that relate to the strand.  Topics covered include "anticipating and managing stressors; having positive and healthy self-esteem; controlling behaviors that are unhealthy for self or others; coping with failure or loss in a healthy manner; recognizing mental and emotional health needs; and accessing appropriate resources."

Part I of North Carolina’s Basic Education Plan for Public Schools (1994) requires school guidance programs to focus on a series of general development areas, which includes appropriate group behavior for grades K-3, relationships among people in grades 4-6, and coping and interaction skills in grades 7-12.

Character Education: §115C-81(h) (2003) requires each local board to develop and implement character education instruction that is to be incorporated into the standard curriculum.


North Dakota

Last Updated: 12/13/2008

The North Dakota Health Content Standards (2008) recommends content standards and gives examples of specific knowledge and activities for teaching students emotional, social, and mental health. In grades K-4, Standard 1 recommends that the importance of emotional and social health be taught. For grades 5-8, Standards 2 and 5 recommend that stress management, characteristics and conditions for positive self-esteem, and emotional and social changes associated with puberty and adolescence be taught. Lastly, in grades 9-12, Standards 1 and 2 recommend that emotional and social changes that occur throughout life and how they differ among individuals, how emotional and social factors influence attitudes and behaviors regarding sexuality, and the interrelationships of intellectual, emotional, social, spiritual, and physical health be taught.

Character Education: Not specifically required.


Nebraska

Last Updated: 11/30/2011

The Nebraska Health Education Frameworks (1998) recommends targets and activities for health education curricula. Principle 1 recommends students in grades K-12 be taught indicators, the interrelationships, and positive factors of emotional, social, and mental health and how emotional and social environments influence personal health. Principle 3 recommends students in grades 3-12 be taught stress management skills. Principle 5 recommends students in grades K-12 be taught healthy expression and handling of feelings. Principle 7 recommends students in grades 6-12 be taught how to identify and strategies to overcome barriers to the communication of feelings. The Nebraska Comprehensive School Counseling Model (2003) also suggests minimum standards for personal and social development for grades K-12.

Character Education: Statute 79-725 (no date available) requires all teachers to give special emphasis in their instruction to positive character traits of citizenship such as common honesty, morality, courtesy, and obedience to the law, among other items. Statute 79-726 (no date available) requires the Commissioner of Education to prepare an outline with suggestions to accomplish the purpose set forth in Statute 79-725 and to incorporate the same in the regular course of study for grades K-12 in all schools. Statute 79-727 (no date available) makes any violation of the previous two statutes a class III misdemeanor offense. The Nebraska Character Education Guidelines (2002) provide direction for administrator and educators when developing their character education programs.


New Hampshire

Last Updated: 12/22/2011

The K-12 Career Development Framework (2000) establishes education standards for career development, including emotional and social education. Standard 4 requires students learn healthy way of dealing with conflict and stress and about having a positive self-image by the end of grade 4. By the end of grade 8, students are required to have learned the importance of maintaining emotional health. By the end of grade 12, students are required to have learned behaviors that maintain emotional health. Standard 5 requires students learn how to appropriately express feelings by the end of grade 4.

The Health Education Curriculum Guidelines (2003) recommend mental, emotional, and social health education be taught progressively based on age appropriateness. The mental health component stresses positive self-image, appropriate and positive expression of feelings, stress and anger management, indicators of depression and other mental illness, and how, where, and when to get help in grades K-12. The physical activity component stresses the mental and social benefits of exercise in grades K-8. The nutrition component stresses how moods and emotions influence food choices in middle school and high school. The family life and sexuality component stresses the learning of the emotional and social changes associated with one's growth and development in grades K-8.

Character Education: No state policy.


New Jersey

Last Updated: 12/26/2011

The CCCS for Comprehensive Health and Physical Education (2009) outline required standards to be met by the end of grades 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12. Standard 2.1 requires that students learn social and emotional health skills. Standard 2.4 requires students learn about emotional and social changes associated with growing up and how to make and maintain healthy relationships. Standard 2.6 requires students learn the social and emotional benefits of regular physical activity by the end of grade 8.

Character Education: Standard 2.2 of the CCCS for Comprehensive Health and Physical Education (2009) requires that all students receive instruction in character development by the end of grades 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12.


New Mexico

Last Updated: 12/27/2011

6.12.6 NMAC (2006) requires each school district and charter school to adopt wellness policies that address student and school employee wellness through a coordinated school health approach which shall include a planned, sequential K-12 Health Education curriculum that addresses the physical, mental, emotional and social dimensions of health and is aligned to the NMPED K-12 Health Education Standards (1997, revised 2006) standards with benchmarks and performance standards as set forth in 6.29.2 NMAC, that includes emotional, social and mental health education.


Nevada

Last Updated: 9/9/2009

State Board of Education Administrative Code 389.2423, 389.281, 389.2944, 389.281, and 389.455 (2000) require students to meet certain standards for emotional, social, and mental health education by the end of grades 2, 3, 5, 8, d 12. These standards are expounded upon in the Health Content Standards (2000).  Standard 1 requires students by the end of grades 2 and 3 to be able to identify indicators of and personal health practices that promote physical, mental, and social health. Standard 3 requires students by the end of grades 3, 5, 8, and 12 to learn about stress and various stress management skills.

Character Education: Not specifically required.


New York

Last Updated: 7/15/2010

Per the Commissioner's Regulation 135.1 (2004), the Learning Standards for Health, Physical Education, and Family and Consumer Sciences (1996) require students in grades K-12 be taught various aspects of social, mental, and emotional health. Standard 1 Intermediate requires students be taught how to recognize the mental, social, and emotional aspects of good health and stress management and stress management. Standard 2 Intermediate requires students learn the emotional conditions necessary for safety. Standard 2 Commencement requires students be taught stress management, the mental and emotional benefits of exercise, and to understand the stages of child development and apply this knowledge to activities designed to enrich the physical, social, mental, and emotional development of a young child. Standard 3 Intermediate requires students be taught to understand how the family can provide for the economic, physical, and emotional needs of its members.

Character Education: Education Law 801-a (2010) requires instruction in civility, citizenship and character education" during the course of instruction in grades kindergarten through twelve. The instruction should address the principles of honesty, tolerance, personal responsibility,  respect  for  others,  observance  of  laws  and rules, courtesy, dignity and other traits which will  enhance the quality of their  experiences  in, and contributions to, the community. Tolerance, respect for others and "dignity" must include awareness and sensitivity to discrimination or harassment and civility in the relations of people of different races, weights, national origins, ethnic groups, religions, religious practices, mental or physical abilities, sexual orientations, genders and sexes.


Ohio

Last Updated: 5/14/2008

Not specifically required.

Character Education: Not specifically required.


Oklahoma

Last Updated: 2/18/2013

The PASS Integrated Curriculum: Health, Safety and Physical Education (2002) recommends emotional, social, and mental health skills be taught to grades 1-12. Standard 1 suggests students be taught the relationship between physical and emotional health in grades 1-4. Standard 3 suggests students be taught anger management, stress management, and the mental consequences of a poor diet in grades 1-8. Standard 5 suggests students in grades 1-8 be taught healthy expression of feelings and emotions and anger management.

Character Education: Not specifically required for all schools. The state has received a one million dollar grant from the U.S. Department of Education to implement the Character Education Pilot Projects Program in 8 school districts. The result has been the implementation of character education programs in 57 school districts, with 52,688 students participating.


Oregon

Last Updated: 11/9/2010

The Health Education Standards (2005) recommend that the mental, social, and emotional health education be taught in grades K-12. These standards provide benchmarks for the acquisition of knowledge and skills related to mental, social, and emotional health such as stress and stress management, healthy expression of emotions, emotional changes in adolescence, positive self-image, pre-social behaviors, and the causes and effects of, and coping with, depression.

Character Education: OAR 581-022-1020 (1997) requires that students in grades K-12 be instilled with the core ethical values that our diverse society shares and holds important, including but not limited to, respect, responsibility, caring, trustworthiness, justice and fairness, and civic virtue and citizenship".


Pennsylvania

Last Updated: 9/28/2010

Standard 10.4 of the Academic Standards for Health, Safety, and Physical Education (2003) requires that students be taught physical activity's social and psychological benefits, such as stress management, and the social factors that influence preferences concerning physical activity by grades 9 & 12. Standard 10.1 requires that students be taught the growth and developmental changes that occur between childhood and adolescence and the factors that can influence these changes by the end of grade 6. Standard 10.1 also requires that students analyze factors that impact growth and development between adolescence and adulthood by the end of grade 9 and that students evaluate factors that impact growth and development during adulthood and into late adulthood by the end of grade 12.

Character Education: Not specifically required.


Rhode Island

Last Updated: 1/30/2013

Section 5.1.10 of the Rules and Regulations for School Health Programs (2009) stresses that mandated health instructional outcomes must include the emotional, behavioral, and social factors that influence both mental and physical health.  Rhode Island's Early Learning Standards framework for early childhood programs also includes standards for Social and Emotional Development.

Rhode Island's Health Education Framework (2010) establishes required health education guidelines for grades K-12. Standard 1 requires all students to learn the indicators and interrelationships of mental, emotional, and social health; Standard 3 requires students in grades K-4 and 9-10 to learn how to identify mental health habits and stress management techniques; and Standard 5 requires students in grades K-10 to learn healthy ways to express feelings.

Character Education: Not specifically required


South Carolina

Last Updated: 4/8/2012

The Health and Safety Education Standards  (2009) requires specific mental, emotional, and social knowledge and skills be imparted by certain grades; however, no specific curriculum is recommended or required. Standard 1.4 requires students to be taught the effects of physical, social, and emotional environments on personal health by the end of grade 5. Standard 2.1 requires students by the end of grade 12 to know the effects of nutrition on physical and mental performance. Standards 3.1 3.7 require students in grades K-12 receive mental health education. Standard 5.1 requires students by the end of grade 8 to know the psychological, physical, and emotional changes that occur during puberty. Standard 6.3 requires students be taught stress management skills by the end of grade 12. Standard 6.5 requires students by the end of grade 8 to know how to express feelings and relieve stress in a healthy manner. Standards 2.1 and 2.3 requires students by the end of grades 5 and 8 respectively to be taught the adverse effects of eating disorders and how to avoid them through modification of personal nutrition practices.

Character Education: Code 59-17-135 (2000) requires each local board to adopt a policy addressing character education. Character education programs must incorporate character traits including respect for others, honest, self-control, etc.

 


South Dakota

Last Updated: 1/8/2013

The state does not require students to receive instruction on emotional, social, or mental health. However, the South Dakota Health Education Standards (2010) broadly and collectively articulate what students should know and be able to do to adopt or maintain health-enhancing behaviors. Knowledge of core health concepts and underlying principles of health promotion and disease prevention are included in Standard 1. Standards 2 through 8 identify key processes and skills that are applicable to healthy living. Each of the 8 health education standards include performance indicators that are specific to what students should know or be able to do in support of each standard by the conclusion of each of the four grade spans. (Pre-K-Grade 2, Grade 3-5, Grades 6-8 and Grade 9-12.) 

There are nine health education content areas which are organized around a combination of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Adolescent Risk Behaviors and traditional health education content areas. The content areas include: Alcohol and Other Drugs, Injury Prevention, Nutrition, Physical Activity, Family Life and Sexuality, Tobacco, Mental Health, Personal and Consumer Health and Community and Environmental Health. 

The state does not require or recommend a specific curriculum framework or curriculum materials.

Character Education: Statute 13-33-6.1 (1997) requires all schools to provide character development instruction, unless the governing body elects, by resolution, effective for not less than one or more than four school terms, to do otherwise.


Tennessee

Last Updated: 9/26/2011

Health Education Standards Grades: pre K – 8 (2008) and Lifetime Wellness: Grades: 9 – 12 (2007) set standards for emotional, social and mental health education curricula, including teaching the characteristics of good mental health, coping skills, stress management, and how to develop and maintain a positive self-esteem. The Tennessee Model for Comprehensive School Counseling (2005) recommends standards and performance indicators for personal and social development education. Standard 7 recommends students in grades K-12 learn how to identify and express feelings and develop a positive self-attitude. Standard 8 recommends students in grades 6-12 learn problem-solving skills for anger and stress management and how to appraise personal skills that contribute to mental and physical health. Standard 9 recommends students in grades K-12 learn about stress and its effect on health and wellness, stress management and coping skills, and proper means of expressing anger. Students in grades 9-12 should also learn about the physical, emotional and psychological risks involved with sexual activity.

Character Education: Code Ann. § 49-6-1007 (2008) requires public school instruction to include character education to “help each student develop positive values and improve student conduct.” The department of education is required to provide the appropriate method of instruction for grades K-12, and LEAs may implement additional courses as they see fit.  This section is amended by 2008 Tenn. Pub. Acts 865 to urge public schools to include the use of nonviolence as a means of conflict resolution.


Texas

Last Updated: 9/24/2009

The Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Health Education (1997) recommends personal and interpersonal skills be taught, including healthy expression of emotions and self-control in grades 1-12. Stress management skills and the various aspects of mental and social health are recommended for grades 3-10.

Character Education: Education Code §29.906 (2003) allows school districts to provide character education programs, stressing positive character traits, using integrated teaching strategies. Teaching specific religious or political beliefs are not authorized.


Utah

Last Updated: 2/8/2012

The Health Education Core - Secondary (2009) and Health Education Core - Elementary (1997) set standards for students in grades K-12 to be taught a basic set of health curriculum. In general, students in grades K-2 are to be taught how to develop social skills and responsible emotional and cognitive behaviors. Students in grades 3-6 are to be taught aspects of and how to improve mental and social health, healthy expression of emotions, the effects of diet and exercise on mental wellness, and stress management. Students in grades 7-8 are to be taught skills and processes for managing stress, the social, emotional, and physical changes of adolescence, and factors that impact mental and emotional health. Students in grades 9-12 are to be taught how choices influence mental, social, emotional, physical, and spiritual health, stress management strategies, and the grieving process.

Character Education: Code 53A-1a-107 (2003) requires the State Board to develop and disseminate a state model curriculum on character development. Code 53A-13-109  (2004) states that the legislature acknowledges civic and character education as fundamental components of public education and requires character education be integrated into the curriculum of all public schools.


Virginia

Last Updated: 11/15/2010

SB640 (2008) requires mental health education and awareness as a part of the sequential family life curriculum for grades K-12. 8VAC20-320-10 (1980) requires elementary and secondary schools to provide a comprehensive health education program which includes a focus on mental health. The Health Education Standards of Learning (2008) requires students to be taught emotional, social, and mental health skills in grades K-2 and 6-10. Health Smart Virginia recommends specific curricula for meeting these standards.

Character Education: Code 22.1-208.01 (2005) requires local school boards to establish a character education program including basic components reflecting civic virtues, promoting student achievement, and reducing disciplinary problems in its schools. The components of each program shall be developed with students, their parents, and the community at large. Specific character traits to be taught are outlined in the statute. The Board of Education must establish criteria for the program.


Vermont

Last Updated: 3/26/2013

The Health Education Grade Expectations (2008) sets health knowledge and skills standards for students in grades PreK-12 via Grade Cluster Expectations (GEs). Standard 1 requires students be taught effective ways to cope with and positively handle emotions in grades 1-2, 5-6, and 9-12. Students in grades 3-4 and 7-12 are to be taught how to identify, positively manage, and design plans for managing stress. Standard 2 requires students in grades 3-6 and 9-12 to learn the indicators of, aspects of, and interrelationships of physical, mental, emotional, and social health. Standard 5 requires students in grades 5-6 to be taught effective ways to express feelings.

Health content to be integrated into these GEs are to include the ways family and friends help meet physical, emotional, and social health needs and strategies to promote emotional and social growth in grades PreK-4. Students in grades 5-8 should also receive education in the components of wellness (social, mental, physical), factors effecting intellectual, physical, social, and emotional health, and factors that contribute to a positive self-image. Students in grades 9-12 should further receive education in physical, emotional, mental, and social health indicators at the various stages of life, signs, behaviors, and symptoms of mental illness, and the interrelationships among mental, physical, social, and emotional health.

Character Education: Not specifically required.


Washington

Last Updated: 3/6/2012

The Health and Fitness Essential Academic Learning Requirements (2002), Benchmark 1, require students to learn how express emotions constructively. Benchmark 2 requires students be taught about the physical, emotional, intellectual, and social changes associated with puberty, the adverse physical, emotional, and economic consequences of being sexually active, and how emotions may influence decision-making and how to develop action strategies for emotional situations. Benchmark 3 requires students be taught how to identify and plan for coping with situations related to the physical, social, and emotional transition from adolescence to adulthood and how to anticipate emotional situations and to develop action strategies that are safe to self and others.

Character Education: RCW 28A.405.030 (1969) states, It shall be the duty of all teachers to endeavor to impress on the minds of their pupils the principles of morality, truth, justice, temperance, humanity and patriotism; to teach them to avoid idleness, profanity and falsehood; to instruct them in the principles of free government, and to train them up to the true comprehension of the rights, duty and dignity of American citizenship".


Wisconsin

Last Updated: 12/13/2012

Statute 115.35 (1997) requires mental health education be taught at the primary and secondary levels. Statute 118.01 (1997) requires school boards to provide instructional programs promoting positive emotional development. Wisconsin's Model Academic Standards for Health Education (2011) recommend certain emotional, social, and mental health education standards be taught in grades K-12. Standard A recommends students by the end of grades 4, 8, and 12 be able to identify and describe positive mental, emotional, social, and physical factors that influence health and their interrelationship with one another. Standard F recommends students by the end of grades 4, 8, and 12 be able to express their feelings in healthy ways.

Wisconsin Model Academic Standards For School Counseling (2007) include three standards in the personal and social domain and support the delivery of social and emotional learning curriculum in the comprehensive school counseling program.

Character Education: Not specifically required.


West Virginia

Last Updated: 3/18/2012

Board Policy 2510 (2008) requires that the Health Content Standards be taught, as defined in Board Policy 2520.5, (2012) in grades Pre-K-12. Standard 1 requires student to learn emotional and social wellness in grades 5 and 9-12. Standard 5 requires students to learn respect for self and others in grades K-1 and 7-8 and healthy expression and recognition of feelings in grades K-12. Standard 3 and 7 require students learn how to manage stress in grades 1, 3-5 and 7-12. Standard 3 also requires students to learn how to recognize, reduce, and report depression and anxiety in grades 7-8 and self-esteem improvement in grades 9-12.

Board Policy 2315 (2002) recommends curriculum for school guidance and counseling programs to impart personal/social development skills such as the emotional dangers of substance abuse, coping with peer pressure, and stress management.

Character Education: Code 18-2-13 (2001) requires character education be taught in grades preschool-12. Board Policy 2520.5 requires students to receive instruction in good character development in high school.


Wyoming

Last Updated: 3/22/2012

The Wyoming Health Content and Performance Standards (2008) mandates health content standards for grades K-12. Standard 3 recommends students in grades 5-12 learn self-management skills such as stress management. Standard 5 recommends students in grades K-12 be taught how to express feelings in a healthy manner.

Character Education: Not specifically required.


Print Page

Click the Print button to print only the content portion of the page. The left menu area and top header will not be printed